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March 22, 1978 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-22

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'CLOAK AND DAGGER' AGENTS ENTER MORO SE

The Michigan Daily-
ARCH:

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>W USEE NEWCAPEN CALL W'O4Jr
The ex-prez cometh
What do you do when you're no longer President? Well, first you visit
all the large, well-known universities you can find and present won-
derfully informative lectures to all the information hungry students.
This can only last so long, however. There are a limited number of
universities who want ex-Presidents to visit them. What do you do
then? The golf links get a little boring after awhile. Never fear, Gerald
Ford has the answer. After two stints as visiting lecturer here, the 'U'
alumnus has moved on to other things - the University's Dearborn
campus. Ford will visit several classes at the suburban Detroit cam-
pus March 31, to give students there a taste of what we already know.
Today UM-Dearborn, tomorrow Cleary College?
Union president
Applicatioris are now available for the position of President of the
Michigan Union Bdard of Directors. Applicants must be enrolled in the
University during the forthcoming academic year. The president's
term of office begins May 1 and continues for a twelve month period.
An honorarium eqhal to in-state tuition is awarded at the completion of
the term of office. Applications are available at the General
Manager's Officeon the main floor of the Union, Monday-Friday, 8-5.
Deadline for returning applications is March 31, 5 p.m.
Happenngs .
are popIng up all over the place. At noon, Okete Shiroya will
speak on "Devlopment of Modern Education in Africa: Problems and
Prospects" at1100 S. University ... the Commission for Women meets
at noon in 259 LSA . . . attend the International Center's weekly
European Trvel Series brown bag, this week's feature is a discussion
of meeting pople, coping with language barriers and other problems
abroad, noo. . . Committee for Human Rights in South American
brown bag,ioon, Suite 1 of the Michigan League ... at 1 p.m., John
Pollack, prfessor of Political Science at Rutgers University, will
speak on "''ie U.S. Media and the Coup in Chile," in 231 Angell Hall. .
Greek Weecontinues with Panhellenic Earth Day and a city clean-up
project, mt at 3 at The Rock. Also at 3, an informational meeting
about the Dace Corps in the International Center Lounge.. . at 3:30,
Richard Ainson lectures on "Rights and Responsibilities in Scien-
tific Resirch" in 100 Hutchings Hall . . . a political science
student/faulty tea brightens up the afternoon, 3:30 Kendell Room of
the Unioi. . . the Vietnam War teach-in continues at 4, with a
workshopn rebuilding Vietnam, featuring Barbara Fuller of Frien-
dshipme.. . take a break until 7, when INFACT holds a meeting in
Guild He. . . the Union Program Committee holds formal instruc-
tion in biroom dancing at 7 in the Union Ballroom.. . at 7:30 in the
School (Education, the Vietnam War teach-in presents "Veterans
and Oth Victims," another in its series of talks ... R.A. Vning, Vice
Preside of Engineering Product Development and.Purchasing for
Chrysleiorporation, speaks on "Birth of a Car," 7:30, Chrysler Cen-
ter Aud~rium, N. Campus.. . also at 7:30, Rev. Anne Broysel, speaks
on "TI-Nature of Oppression" at the Wesley Foundation, 602 E.
Huron. the Intercooperative Council Affirmative Action Committee
will orate an information booth concerning fall housing in South
Quad'sfro Lounge, 7:30 ... at 8, Andrew Watson, psychiatrist and
lawye speaks on "Professional Stress," Rackham Amphitheatre,
sponsed by Interflex student council. . . the movie "Biberpel'z" will
be shi at 8 in Max Kade Gernam House, Oxford Housing . . . the
Centeor Western European Studies presents the introduction to its
mini-arse, "The Scandinavian Experience," 8 p.m., MLB Lecture
Root. . . end the evening at a Purim party, sponsored by Hillel, 1429
Hill, :30. . . Have a nice (but busy) day!
O the outside ...
E streak of dull weather will continue with partly cloudy skies and
ligwinds, high today-45-47. Tonight some clouds will roll in bringing
rashowers to relieve the boredom. Lows will be between 31 and 34.
Tprrow calls for a repeat performance, with temperatures in the
mito-upper 40s.

Nations join to end terr

ROME (AP) - A new breed of
European cloak-and-dagger agent has
emerged in the hunt for Aldo Moro's
kidnappers, underlining a commitment
to international cooperation in the war
against terrorism.
The possibility of a foreign connec-
tion in former Premier Moro's abduc-
tion has brought in foreign anti-
terrorist experts schooled in computers
as well as sophisticated weaponry.
BRITAIN dispatched two officers to
Italy from the counter-insurgency ar-

my unit, the Special Air Services, which
has battled terrorism and guerrillas in
Europe, Africa and the Far East in
recent years.
In October these SAS mem, requested
by West German Chancellor Helmut
Schmidt, accompanied the German
team that stormed the hijacked Luf-
thansa airliner in Mogadishu, Somalia,
and supplied special stun grenades
used to immobilize the gunmen before
they could shoot their hostages. Last
summer SAS officers helped Dutch
authorities plan an assault by marines

Nutritionists discuss
'well-balanced' diet

By CONSUELO ANCOG
"If we all went on a diabetic diet
tomorrow, we'd all be better off," said
Marion Prince, president of the Ann
Arbor Dietetic Association (AADA).
"The diabetic diet doesn't contain
sugar, and you don't get empty
calories."
Prince was one of four registered
dieticians at a nutrition forum Wed-
nesday night at Stockwell Hall. The
forum was one of many activities spon-
sored by the AADA for National
Nutrition Week, March 5-11.
LYNN GLAZEWSKI, who spoke
about weight reduction at the forum,
estimated that 40 million Americans
are obese because of lack of exercise,
step-saving evices, the availability of
foods and poor eating habits.
"Eating is a response, a habit that
you develop over the years," Glazewski
said. "Things you associate with eating
cause you to overeat."
Glazewski said the Weight Watcher's
diet is the most effective of all diets
because it is a ridig program which
doesn't use calorie counting, and
because it involves a group approach to
dietigg.
VEGETARIANS DON'T have to
worry about becoming overweight
because their diets are low in fat and
calories, said Susan Raatz, an instruc-
tor at Eastern Michigan University.
But vegetarians do have to be concer-
ned with getting enough protein in their

diet.
"Egg and milk products provide the
right essential amino acids that you
need in your diet," said Raaatz.
"Luckily, in this part of the country
there's not too much of a problem
because people are mostly lacto-ovo
vegetarians, they consume milk and
eggs in their diet."
Total vegetarians also don't have to
worry about cholesterol, since it is only
found in animal products, Marci
Bosscher, who has worked at the Hypo-
Lipidemia Clinic at University
Hospital, said that cholesterol has
become a popular topic because it has
been found to be related to the
development of arteriosclerosis, a
heart disease.
"IF YOU HAVE a family history of
heart disease, it is important to watch
your cholesterol level," said Bosscher.
The dieticians also discussed the
question of breakfast and agreed it is
better to have an instant breakfast food
than nothing at all.
"You need that 'gas' in the morning
because your body's blood sugar level
is very low," said Prince.
Lucita Alcantaa, Food Service
Manager at Stockwell, explained,
however, that the University doesn't of-
fer breakfast in the dorms because very
few people ate the meal.
"It's politics," Alcantara said. "It is
up to the students to select a well-
trained diet providing all the necessary
nutrients to keep a normal nutrition
status."

to free hostages held by Moluccan
terrorists.
Moro's kidnap was staged by the Red
Brigades, a Marxist urban guerrilla
group blamed for industrial sabotage,
abductions and murders over the past
eight years. While no clear-cut link
between the Red Brigades and foreign
groups has been established, police are
investigating a number of possible con-
nections.
IN THE MORO hunt, Germany has
sent agents of the federal criminal of-
fice which has been seeking the
terrorists involved in last year's
slaying of industrialist Hanns-Martin
Schleyer.
The kidnapping of Moro in a street
ambush last Thursday by gunmen who
killed his five bodyguards was nearly
identical in execution to Schleyer's ab-
duction by members of the Baader-
Meinhof group.
Bildzeitung, West Germany's largest
newspaper, reported Tuesday that a
German doctor convicted of helping
criminals may be using drugs to keep
Moro under sedation in a "peoples
prison" in Italy. The newspaper quoted
officials in Rome as saying Dr.
Ekkehard von Seckendorff, 37, had
been seen in the capital.
VON SECKVNDORFF was convicted
in '1974 of supporting a criminal
organization and received a one-year
suspended sentence. Soom afterward,
he disappeared and was believed to
have joined the underground, the paper
said.
Practical cooperation between Italy
and West Germany was worked out
during a visit to Bonn in January by
Italian Defense Minister Francesco
Cossiga.
Reporting to Parliament several
weeks before the visit, Cossiga said
"the international ties ... of terrorism
are clear" and therefore the battle
could not be handled as one state's af-
fair. He. said Italy was collaborating
with member countries of the European
Common Market and with "other frien-
dly allied countries."
THE FULL EXTENT of West Ger-
man cooperation has not been
disclosed, but Italian officials said a
computer hookup with the federal
criminal office in Wiesbaden has been

Wednesday, March 22, 1978-Page8:'
"*
orism
set up enabling Italy to make use of
German files on known terrorists, their
methods of operation and to help trace
weapons.
Italian newspapers report that the
Red Army faction of the Baader-
Meinhof group may have bought arms
in Aosta, in northern Italy near the
French border, while the Red Brigades
are believed to have offered passports
and other documents and "safe houses" a
to the German terrorists.
a
4

The foreign agents are working out of
the Viminale Palace, the headquarters
of Italy's Interior Ministry in downtown
Rome.
U.S. officials said American agents
haven't entered the case because no
request has been made.
Several newspapers here reported a
possible "Libyan connection" and that
Israel's crack secret service has joined
in the manhunt, but the Israel Embassy
denied any of its agents are involved.
TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII, No. 135
Wednesday. March 22. 1978
is edited and managed by students at theUniversity
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postage is paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

The Ann Arbor Film Co-operative
presents at AUD A OF ANGELL HALL

Wednesday, March 2

12

ADMISSION FREE

CAMPTAMARCK-SUMMER JOBS
COUNSELORS. SUPERVISORS,
SPECIALISTS, NURSES,
BUS DRIVERS, KITCHEN STAFF
INTERVIEWING: MARCH 29
SUMMER PLACEMENT
Call1763.4117

WIM WENDERS FESTIVAL
ALICE IN THE CITIES

(Wim Wenders, 1975) 7 & 9 AUDA
Alice is a nine-year-old girl whose mother abandons her in New York with Phillip (Rudiger Volger). a
footloose German journalist traveling the roads of America. Feeling old and unable to write, he feels
his creativity is exhausted and gets by snapping Polaroid pictures. Getting Alice back to her family
in Europe becomes his new goal. Wenders has a lot to say about language and the similarities
and differences between cultures. "A fine, tightly controlled, intelligent and ultimately touching film."
-N.Y. Times. In German. with subtitles.
Friday: MONTY PYTHON i
"THE BIRTH OF A CAR"
PLYMOUTH HORIZON/DODGE OMNI
NEW EFFICIENCY SIZED, FRONT-WHEEL-DRIVE, AMERICAN CARS
A Presentation By

r. ::. .,..
r'
Dai Official Bulletin
JNESDAY, MARCH 22, 1978
;Daily Calew
Ctr. Russ'E. European Studies: Svat Soucek,
"Rubbian-kic Bilingualism in Soviet Central
Asia: The e of Chinghiz Aitmatov," Commons
=Rm., Lane1, noon.
Ctr. Afinerican/African Studies: Okete J.
-Shiroya, "'Development of Modern Education in
Africa: Ppms and Prospects," 1100 S. Univ.,
noon.
Sea GrJJrban Planning: Richard Gardner,
"Costal z, Planning: Status and Future," 151
Chrysler 01:30 p.m.
Nuclearg.: Kent Kamischke, "Environmental
Chemistryd the Management of Radioactive
Wastes," 'ito Lab., 3:30 p.m.
Ctr. Ea Childhood Educ/Psychology: Ellen
Markmaiatanford Univ., "Concepts and
Numericaasoning," Schorling Aud., 4 p.m.
Physics. Gridley, "The Positronium Decay
Rate Stor'he Problem is Still Unresolved," 296
Dennison,m.

HI/FR STUDIO
Stereo A T . Service
Fast-Competent
RENTALS AT STUDENT RATES
215 S. Ashley 769-0342
Downtown, I block west of Main,
between Washington and Liberty

R.A. VINING
Executive Vice President - Engineering, Product Development,
Sponsored By
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
STUDENT CHAPTER
SOCIETY OF AUTOMOTIVE ENGINEERS

Purchasing

Date: March 22,1978
Thme: 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Place: Chrysler Center (North Campus)
Parking Provided Behind Chrysler Center
All Interested Faculty and Students Invited

f---

m a~a

Study--%
in Itay
Jext Fal
BarbTi Center/Rome Campus
Sponsored By
TR4ITY COLLEGE
Offikof Educational Services

There's No Business Like...
the exciting world of Show Business in our Theme Parks:
KINGS ISLAND - Cincinnati, Ohio
KINGS DOMINION - Richmond, Va.
CAROWINDS - Charlotte, N.C.
Shows are presented with complete scenery,
costumes, staging and choreography in fully
equipped theatres and on modern outdoor stages
for the summer. There are openings for:
SINGER/DANCERS AND MUSICIANS
$155 to $200 a week (Plus round trip airfare to the park)

p

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