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March 19, 1978 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-19

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'f I U SEE * 1S hAkPP'( C1Ot DA y
Attention, 1979 grads
It's never too early to start thinking about getting your lovely mug
recorded for posterity, according to the folks at the Michiganensian. If you
are expecting to graduate in 1979, the yearbook people want you to know
that pictures are being taken starting March 20 for next year's 'Ensian. For
an appointment, stop by the Student Publictions Building, 420
Maynard, during business hours, or call 764-0561 between 7 and 9 p.m.,
Monday through Friday.
Happenings.. ..
.. begin today at 10 a.m. when the Ann Arbor Art Association holds
its annual Palm Sunday Pottery Sale at the Art Association building,
117 W. Liberty. The sale ends at 5,.,. . A representative from the
Michigan office of the American Agricultural Movement will speak on
Farmers' Strike at 11 a.m. in the Wesley Lounge, 602 E. Huron. A
discussion will follow the talk, which is sponsored by the Wesley
Dfoundation. . . the Percussion Music Show with Kenny Attie and
Steve Poceta will be presented at 1 p.m. on WCBN, 88.3 FM.. . Siddha
Yoga Dham sponsors an introductory program on Yoga and
Meditation at 2:30 at 1520 Hill. Refreshments will be served.. . An
art exhibit opens at 3 with a reception at the Trotter House. Included is
a special presentation on American/Third World posters ... the
Teach-In on the Vietnam War begins at 4 with a workshop on teaching
about the war at 2224 School of Education Building. . . The Gilbert
and Sullivan Society sings excerpts from Gondolas at 5 in the
League. . Forget the table manners at a spaghetti eating contest
beginning at 5:30. You'll be served all the spaghetti you can eat with
your hands tied behind your bac. Proceeds from the Alpha Tau
Omega (1405 Hill) event will go to the Epilepsy Foundation. . . Clean
up and attend the Sigma Chi Swimathon at Matt Mann pool. Proceeds
go to the American Cancer Society and the Women's Crisis Center.
For information about sponsoring a swimmer, call Tom Slickers at
668-9336...
MONDAY bring your lunch to a noon speech by Notre Dame Law
Professor Rudy Sandoval on LSAT and minority admissions to law
school. LaRaza Law Student Association sponsors the talk in the
Lawyer's Lounge in the Law School.. . films will be shown in the a
Angela Davis lounge of Markley hall beginning at 3:30: Chile With
Poems and Guns and Bay of Pigs... Also in the Davis Lounge, Jose
Garcia speaks on Chicano migration in the United States at 7. . . Part
II of the Sigma Chi Swimathon will be held at Matt Mann pool starting
at 7. . . at 7:30, Terry Jacobs and Tamara Voget speak on Energy: A
concept in wholistic health in the Green Lounge of East Quad . . . also
at 7:30, Students for Open Discussion sponsor a forum on the miner's
strike in room 124, East Quad. . . also at East Quad at 7:30, see the
film Black Girl in room 126. . . The Vietnam War teach-in continues
at 7:30 in Schorling Auditorium with a panel discussion on Vietnam
and the United States .. . 7:30 again: The International Center Rec.
Room is the site for Ken Feit's talk on Verbal Communication for
Overseas Travellers. . . That's it 'till Tuesday.
On the outside . . .
The winds will be a bloin' today as temperatures stay in the 30s.
High should be about 380 and the low in the low 3s. The skies will allow
some sunshine through as well as a small consolation to eager Spring
hopefuls.
Daily Official Bulletin
SUNDAY, MARCH 19; 1978
Day Calendar:
Res. Coll./E. Quad: "Prostitution Education Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri., 7 9
Project," 11:30a.m.; "Panel on MinorityWomen,"3 Sot., Sun., Wed.,1-3-5-7-0
p.m., E. Quad.
Outing Club: Hiking, meet Huron St. entrance,
Rackham, 1:30p.m.
Kelsey useum: Gallery talk, Tony Hirshel,
"slamic Art in the U-M Collections", Kelsey, 2 p.m.
Pendleton Arts Info Ctr.: "The Gemini," 2nd floor,
Union, 2 p.m.
Musket: "West Side Story," Power, 2, 8 p.m.92TCT F
Yeats Festivasl: "Words for Music, Perhaps".,© 9 20 CON
Mendelssohn, 3 p.m.; "The Cuchelain Saga," Art
Museum, 8 p.m.
Music School: Black Amer. Composers (vocal).
Rackhaih Aus., 4 p.m.
Greek Week: Benefit spaghetti dinner, 1415 Cam-
bridge, 5:30-8 p.m.; benefit, "Swimathon,"Matt
Mann Pool, 7-11 p.m.
16th Annual Ann Arbor Film Festival: "Winnerrs' Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri., 7-9
Night," Old Arch. Aud., & Aud. A. Angell 7, 9, 11 p.m.
Musical Society: Baltimore Symphony, Hill Aud., Sat., Sun., Wed., 1-3-5-7-9
8:30p.m.
Ark: Traditional Amer Choral music, 1421 Hill, 9
p.m.
MONDAY, MARCHl 0, 1978
Journalism: S. Friedman, Washington Bureau,
Knight-Ridder newspapers, "How Can Journalism A N
Stop Super-marketing the News and Get Down to

Reporting?" W. Conf. Rm., 4th fir., Rackham, 3 p.m.
Particle Physics Seminar: L. Schachinger,
Rutgers, "Precision Measurement of the Magnetic
Moment", 2038 Randall Lab, 4 p.m.
Special Statistics Seminar: R. Bradley, U.C. San
Diego, "On the Uniform Mixing Coefficients of
Stationary Sequences," 451 Mason, 4 p.m.
Vietnam. Anti-War Movement Teach-in:
,Workshop-"Teaching about the Vietnam War,' Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.. 7-
2225 SEB, 4 p.m.; M. Young, "On Forgetting about Sat., Sun.. Wed., 1-3-5-7-9
the War": Eqbal Ahmad, "On Continuing the War":
D. Dellinger, "On Continuing the Resistance"
Schorling Aud.. SEB, 7:30 p.m.
SUMMER PI.A('EMENT
3200SAR 763-4117 -
Veterans Admin., Fort Lyon, Co: Summer -
program for student nurses: must have completed7A TC E
Fundamentals I & II: also openings for graduating ©1978PARAMOUNTPICTURESCORP'
srs. & RtNs; details available.

The Michigan Daily-Sunday, March 19, 14978-Pa~e 3'
091
Oilspilspo~ls French shoreline ,

BREST, France (AP)-Millions of
gallons of oil from a wrecked super-
tanker, potentially the biggest spill on
record, swept down the picturesque
Brittany coast yesterday, blackening
beaches and fouling harbors along 60
miles of shoreline,
Fisherman in a score of villages wat-
ched helplessly as the giant slick
smothered their livelihoods, possibly
for years to come.
But as critical hours ticked by,
nothing was being done to stem the
flow, and on the eve of today's national
parliamentary elections in France, the
spill became a campaign issue.
AN ESTIMATED 24 million gallons
had flowed from three punctured tanks
by yesterday afternoon, and twice that
much oil remained in 12 other intact
tanks of the American-owned ship, the
Amoco Cadiz.
The ship, owned by a subsidiary 'of
the American Oil Co., hit a reef a mile
offshore Thursday night. The crew of 41
was rescued.
The ship carries pollution insurance.
mostly through Lloyds of London, but the
amount was not immediately known.
BRITISH POLLUTION control ex-
perts were keepin a nervous eye on the
new slick, 25 miles long and five miles
wide. But they said it poses no im-
mediate danger to English beaches.
It's a tragedy. This was a prosperous
little town with the fishing and the
tourists. Now God knows what will hap-
pen," said a woman in a cafe in Por-
tsall, the largest of about 20 fishing
villages in the polluted area.
A harborside fish shop in Portsall
stood empty. A sign read: "No fish. Oil
for sale here. Direct from the well."
THE SOCIALIST mayor of Brest
blames the center-right coalition that
governs France, saying nothing had
been learned from the previous spills.
Some analysts predicted the spill
could push ecology-minded voters, a

AP Photo
The French city of Ader Benoist erected this barrier yesterday to protect the harbor from the millions of gallons of4
leaking from the ship Amoco Cadiz. The tanker ran aground Friday and broke in two off the Brittany coast.

potent force in French politics, toward
the left in Sunday's election.
AN AIRPLANE with high-volume
pumps and technicians from Detroit
was en route to the. scene to help with
the clean-up. French authorities hoped
to lace the pumps on the tanker by
helicopter and pump the remaining oil
to smaller tankers before the ship
breaks up.
"That's useless. They should bomb the
ship immediately to set it afire. Pum-
ping will take at least two weeks and by
then I guarantee nothing will be left of

the ship," said Jules Legendre,
assistant mayor of Portsall and a for-
mer tanker officer.
He said high tides and bad weather
are predicted, and "we'll have
another 150,000 tons of oil on our coast."
The five-year-old vessel, flying the
Liberian flag, was en route to the nor-
thern French port of Le Havre from the
Persian Gulf when its steering malfun-
ctioned. Attempts to tow it to safety
failed when tug cables snapped and the
ship drifted onto the rocks.
BITTER FISHERMEN gathered in a
harborfront cafe, ironically named "Le

Recife" The Reef, and stared at th@
harbor, covered in inches of black oil.
"We were going to protest by taking
our ship's papers to the authorities;
symbolically laying up our boats, but
we can't even get out to them through
this oil," said Auguste Noac'h, a Pot-
tsall fisherman for most of his 60 yearst
One local official said at least 2VO6L
persons in the port and the surrounding.
villages stood to lose their livelihoods'
because of the disaster.
'The government is going to have to
help us. The fishermen don't normally
even get relief," he said.

CINEMA I ,
Sunday, March 19
FILM FESTIVAL WINNERS

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Highlights from the 16th Annual Ann Arbor 16mm Film Fes-
tivsl. Three completely different shows. Program notes will

be available.
7,9 & 11 p.m..

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ANGELL HALL- AUD A

$1.50

L.Tuesday: Eustache's THE MOTHER AND THE WHORE .

Hey! UAC needs
new Program Directors

ARTCARVED's new fashion rings are very different from traditional college rings. Each is a
unique, contemporary design, and very much your college. Whichever style you choose in our
large collection can be personalized by the custom features you select.
THE ARTQIRVED REPRESENTATIVE
will be here to help you select your ring.

. f ' A II! / ' '1

The University Activties Center
MAC; is the larges t 'student un
or ganizactonon0 cornIpT(sWe pro.
vide U M students with hundreds, of
culuIralor am~O0s (and enrtertainingT

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