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March 18, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-18

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Page 2-Saturday, March 18, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Church Worship Services

BACKS 'U' UNIONS:
Pro-labor group formed
By MITCH CNO

AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER AND
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
501 E. Huron-663-9376
0. Carroll Arnold, Minister
Papl Davis, Interim Campus Minister
Worship-10 a.m.; Bible Study-1i
a.m.
Fellowship Meeting-Wednesday at
7:45 p.m.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
State at Huron and Washington
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
The Rev. Fred B. Maitland
The Rev. E. Jack Lemon
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00.
Church School at 9:00 and 11:00.
Adult Enrichment at 10:00.
WESLEY FOUNDATION
UNITED METHODIST
CAMPUS MINISTRY
W. Thomas Shomaker,
Chaplain/Director
Extensive programming for under-
grads and grad students.
THE GAMES GO
TO 1 A.M. TONIGHT!
Pinball
Bowling and
Billiards
aThe UNION
4p

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-11:00 a.m.
at Howard Jonhson's
2380 Carpenter Rd.
Dial-a-Thought: 971-5230
Where people of all ages learn to ex-
press their inner potentials. For more
information call 971-5262.
* * *
ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekend Masses:
Saturday-10 p.m.
Sunday-7':45 a.m., 9 a.m., 10:30
a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at the Ann Arbor Y,
530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
Students Welcome.
For information or transportation:
663-3233 or 426-3808.
10:00 a.m.-Sunday Worship.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
Steve Bringardner, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-6:00 p.m.
* * *
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Minister
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service
6:30 p.m.-Informal Worship

- ip

s

-CINEMA II-
Saturday, March 18
THE LION IN WINTER
Director-ANTHONY HARVEY (1968)
With KATHARINE HEPBURN as Eleanor of Aquitane and PETER O'TOOLE as
Henry 11, this contest of will makes for another marvelous and witty pro-
duction by the ever popular Joseph E. Levine. The movie is outdoorsy and
fun, full of the kind of comic plotting and dramatic action people used to
go to just plain movies for; the acting is joyful and solid. Ergo . .. 1968
Academy Award for Best Motion Picture! Plus Hepburn in an astounding
display of her own brand of fireworks.
7 & 915 p.m. ANGELL HALL -AUD. A $1.50

CANTERBURY HOUSE
(Episcopal Student Foundation)
218 N. Division
665-0606
Chaplain: Rev. Andrew Foster
Choral Evensong Sunday evenings at
7:00 p.m. at St. Andrew Episcopal
Church, 306 N. Division.
* * *
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
608 E. William, corner of State
Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Morning Worship-10 a.m.
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL-A Campus
Ministry of the Christian
Reformed Church
1236 Washtenaw Ct.-668-7421
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
Sunday Services at 10 a.m., 6 p.m.
Coffee hour-11:15 a.m.
* * *
ANN ARBOR CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadiui Blvd.
(one block west of U of M Stadium)
Bible Study-Sunday, 9:30 a.m.;
Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m. and
6:00 p.m.
Need transportation? Call 662-9928.
* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Services and Sunday School
-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meeting-8:00
p.m.
Child Care Sunday-under 2 years.
Christian Science Reading Room-
206 E. Liberty, 10-5 Monday-Saturday;
closed Sundays.
* ** *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.-663-5560
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and 10:30
a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
Midweek Lenten Service Wednesday,
7:30 p.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
662-4466
Sunday:
9:30 and 11:00 t.m.-Worship.
12:00-Coffee Hour.
Fellowship and dinner Sunday, 4:00.
Francis Poulance's "Gloria" and "Or-
gan Concerto in G-Minor."
7:30 p.m.-Tuesday-Worship at The
Ark Coffee House.
LORD OF LIGHT
LUTHERAN CHURCH
(the campus ministry of the ALC-LCA)
Gordon Ward, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St.
Sunday Worship at 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study: Historical Je-
sus/Risen Lord-9:30 am.
Tuesday Bible Study: History of the
Bible-7:30 pm.
Thursday evening Bible Study on
North Campus-8:00 p.m.
Holy Week Services:
Wednesday-Agape Meal 6:00 p.m.
Maundy Thursday-Communion
Service 7:30 p.m.
Good Friday-Trenebrae Service
7:30 p.m.
Easter Vigil-
Saturday 11:30p.m.
Easter Service-11:00 a.m.

CITIZENS TO WITHHOLD HALF OF INCOME TAX:

A2 group
By LEONARD BERNSTEIN
Until now non-payment of federal in-
come taxes was an individual's decision
of conscience. But on April 15, the
deadline for filing tax returns, at'least
one small group of Ann Arbor citizens
plans to publicly announce its refusal to
pay taxes which support war efforts.
About 30 persons will take their
returns to the Federal Building, an-
nounce their objections and file their
returns. The group also plans to adver-
tise their names and decisions in area
newspapers.
MOST MEMBERS will deduct half of
the federally requested amount -
reflecting their estimates of the tax
dollars which go to the Defense budget,
veterans' benefits, interest on the
national debt and research for nuclear
weaponry.
But the amount is "largely sym-

won (pay I
bolic," according to the group's
spokesman, Bill Van Wycke.
The group protests nuclear
proliferation in particular and war
preparations in general. ' Protest
organizer Wladyslaw Narowski said the
spread of nuclear weapons creates
paranoia.
AMERICANS "feel the bomb con-
trols us. It has a power over us we can't
do anything about," he said.
"The very insecurity we've tried to
avoid, we've created," added Van
Wycke.
According to Narowski, the United
States now possesses 30,000 nuclear
bombs and produces three more daily.
Continuous tax resistance "becomes
a way of life," said Narowski. He cited
the example of one school teacher who
lived on a yearly salary one cent below
the $3200 minimum on which taxes

tax to war
must be paid, rather than pay war
taxes.
ONCE A CITIZEN refuses to pay
taxes, the IRS must take action. Initial-
ly, notices are sent requesting the taxes
be paid. The resistor also could be
taken to court or visited by IRS agents
requesting financial information, such
as bank account records, Narowski
said.
Further measures could be more
severe. Seizure of property and court
orders requesting banks to turn over
funds are two alternatives. The govern-
ment could also garnish the resistors'
wages directly from employers.
If all else fails, tax resistors may be
arrested and jailed. But according to
Narowski, the bad publicity resulting
from this has kept arrests down to a
very small number.

When American Federation of State,
Municipal and County Employees
(AFSCME) struck the University last
year, they called for student support.
The Graduate Employes Organiza-
tion (GEO) always seeks student sup-
port for its actions.
NOW, THE Campus Labor Support
Group (CLSG) is trying to cull and
coordinate support from the com-
munity for all labor organizations at the
University.
"We support the tuition bodies," said
David Kelley, a founder of the new
organization. "We can become the
vital element in the decisions that are
made" regarding University policy on
labor unions here.
Promoting awareness of labor-
University conflicts is one of the
organization's major goals.

"IT IS a very young organization,"
said Bruce Richard, another founder of
the group. "It is very much in a fluid
state. We re simply responding to a
crying need for this type of
organization."
The group's leaders attack Univer-
sity management for trying to put what
they call a hammerlock on union ac-
tivity.
"There is an anti-union, antilabor,
keep-them-in-their-place attitude at
this university," Richard said.
KELLEY stressed the potential
power of students to help labor's side.
"I think if there's a student presence
which can help break down the division
between the workers and the Universty,
I think that would be helpful," he said.
He said he is confident students could

change the system, despite University
efforts to keep them uninformed. "With
information, an informed student popu-
lation at this University would be able
to stand behind a union," he said.
At a recent meeting, the organization
outlined other plans. These include:
" promotion of the organization of
unorganized campus labor, par-
ticularly the campaign of the
Organizing Committee for Clericals
(OCC) for a union
" mass involvement in educational
and activist aspects of that
organizational drive.
* development of longer-range
strategies.
The group also decided to support all
efforts to drive the Nazis from their
Detroit bookstore, and to give full sup-
port to the United Mine Workers strike.

Hanna admits
WASHINGTON (AP)-Richard Han- nment.
na, a white-haired former Hanna, who s
congressman, confessed yesterday that 1936 to 1974, wan
he received more than $200,000 for Judge William
using his office to assist Tongsun Park,
who allegedly schemed to buy support
for south Korea on Capitol Hill.'
In a plea bargaining deal with the D ai
government, in which 39 of 40 counts
were dropped, Hanna became the first s.
present or former congressman convic-
ted in the Korean influence-buying sATURDA
scandal that has shaken the capital. Day calendar:
BUT HANNA, a California Women's CareerF
Democrat, denied through his lawyer (registration, 8:30-9 a
yknowledge of the alleged connec- Res. Coll./E. Wa
any kworkshop, 9:30 a.m.;
tion of Park, a rice dealer, to the South Inc., wash. D.C.,
Korean Central Intelligence Agency Process," i1 a.m.;
KCIA. Music," 8:30 p.m.; all
Yats F tial" 1

se
an

to taking pay-off
position of what happened to me, where
erved in congress from I went wrong," but the judge, following
ted to give U.S. District normal legal procedure, refused to
Bryant "a simple ex- listen to his explanation.

ily Official Bulletin

AY, MARCH 18, 1978

Fair: Aud. 3, MLB, 8:30-4:30
.m.)
aud: Women's Self Defense
Carolyn Bode, Women's Lobby
"Abortion in the Legislative
"An Evening of Woman's
l at E.Quad.
Rla T CT nnLIc M i'Mall,

Hanna pleaded guilty in U.S. District
Court to a single count of conspiracy to
defraud the U.S. government, thereby
avoiding a trial that was scheduled to
begin next week. He could be sentenced
to a maximum of five years in prison
and a $10,000 fine. No sentencing date
was set pending a probation report, and
Hanna remains free.
As he was led from the courtroom for
fingerprinting and processing Hanna
brushed past reporters and refused to
talk.
MEANWHILE, in another cour-
troom, a jury heard opening arguments
in the trial of Hancho Kim, also charged
in the Korean influence buying scandal.
Kim, a Korea-born cosmetics salesman
and Washington businessman, is
charged with defrauding the gover-

Yea s esi val:1 :t. iau, 1. uonnors, m. vmany,
"Ensemble Theatre," 10 a.m.; J. De Puit, composer,
pianist; V. Embree, assoc. prof, Dance; B.Manley,
actress; J. Martin, TA, Theatre; G. Meier, dir, U.
Orchestra, "Reflections on Performing Poetry,
Drama, Music and Dance," I p.m.; "The Uncon-
trollable Mystery," 2:30 p.m.; all at Pendleton Rm.,
Union; "Words for Music Perhaps," Mendlessohn, 8
p.m.; "The Cuchulain Saga," Art Museum, 8 p.m.;
"Evening at the Pub," U. Club, Union, 10:30 p.m.
Eclipse Jazz: Archie Shepp, "Revolutionary Con-
cepts in African-American Music," Trotter House, 2
p.m.; Shepp & Barry Harris, Rackham Aud., 7:30,
10:30 p.m.
Musket: "West Side Story," Power, 8 p.m.
Men's Glee Club: Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Greek Week: All Greek party, 1405 Hill, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Ark: Hedy West, 1421 Hill, 9 p.m.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200 SAB 763-4117
Veterans Admin., Fort Lyon, Co: Summer
program for student nurses; must have completed
Fundamentals I & 11; also openings for graduating
srs. & RNs; details available.

Menomonie Public Schools, WI: Opening for
Driver Ed. Inst., WI. certfication required; details
available.
Cushing Acad., Ashburnham, MA: Opening for
English teacher as 2pd language; MA required; fur-
ther details available.
Kostecks & Associates, Wixom, MI: Opening for
Civil Serv. Engr. completing jr. year; also part-time
opening for graduating sr., details available.
Time, Inc. New York: Summer program open to
students who have completed Jr. year; details
available.
INTERVIEWS:
Register in person or by phone (763-4117)
Printco, Inc. Greenville, MI (northeast of Grand
Rapids): Interview Fri., Mar. 24, 9-5; opening for In-
dus. Engr. Students who have completed Jr. year.
Camp Sea Gull, Coed, MI: Interview Mon., Mar.
20, openings include arts/crafts, gymnastics, cooks,
dance, drama, tennis:.
Camp Ai-gon-quin, Ann Arbors Y': Openings for
waterfront (WSI), sports, water skiing, tripping, ar-
ts/crafts, maintenance; contact Tom Sawyer, Ann
Arbor 'Y' by phone 663-0536 or in person.
Camp Oakland, MI. Handi: Interview Monday,
Mar, 27, 1-5. Openings include camp counselors,
waterfront (W'SI-20), Health Dir., (20); under-
privileged children.
Camp Maplehurst, MI. Coed: Interview Wed.,
Mar. 29, 1-5. Openings include waterfront (WSI),
riding, (Eng.-Western), sports, nurse.
Pretty Lake Vacation Camp, MI: Interview
Thurs., Mar. 30, openings include cabin counselors,
waterfront (WSI), cook.

.

A summer of intellectual stimulation

This June, you can go to
one of the world's top

in a Mediterranean

u
c
s(
e

fi
m
a
h
c
c

universities and take(
:ourses in such fields as
history, literature, lan-
Duages,=sciences, mathe- s a 11P'llbro
matics, technology, the
ocial sciences,.and
education. MUIR WOODS
Between classes you'll s, '"" d
ind yourself in one of the 76
worlds top recreation M.Dibl
areas - near hills for ┬░ANGEL IS.
hiking, ocean beaches, A(A Anz KI.KLtrY
San Francisco Bay, and,
San Francisco itself - in OAKLAND
some of the world's top SAN
weather. FRANCISCO
Send for your copy of
>ur 1978 Summer Session
Bulletin and an applica-
:ion for admission by
nailing the coupon
below.

11

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