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March 02, 1978 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-03-02

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Page 2-Thursday, March 2, 1978-The Michigan Daily
'U' representatives and nurses
near settlement on new contract

By SUE WARNER
Negotiators for the University and
the Professional Nurse Council met
yesterday in continuing contract
negotiations and are apparently
near agreement on a new contract.
The Council represents over 800
non-supervisory nurses at the
University. The nurses are working
under their previous contract
originally set to expire last Dec. 31.
The contract had been extended to
Tuesday but in negotiations that
night both sides agreed to another
seven-day extension.
UNIVERSITY negoitiator John
Forsyth said yesterday there is a

"high probablility" the two sides
will reach a settlement next week.
"There have been definite signs of
progress in the last few days," For-
syth said.
The two sides are scheduled to
meet again next Tuesday.
Margo Barron, the nurses' chief
bargainer, said a membership
meeting held Sunday night helped
narrow down the Council's position
on some of the unresolved issues.
"IT ALWAYS helps to go back -to
the membership," said Barron. "We
had a good turnout and people were
really interested in the issues.'
Forsyth said he could not tell if the

meeting had had a direct effect on
bargaining. However, he and Barron
agreed a state-appointed mediator
present at Tuesday's session aided
negotiators in reaching agreement
on several issues.
Both sides agreed to seek a
mediator's help two weeks ago and
the mediator will also be present at
Tuesday's bargaining session.
Neither side would comment on
specificunresolved issues for fear of
hindering the negotiating process.
"We're moving very cautiously
ahead, hammering things out," said
Barron.

Partyers
warned to
heed laws
(Continued from Page 1)
"They take the risk and get caught."
The law prohibiting alcohol has been
in effect since 1965. "We had to learn
the hard way many years ago," sighed
Jenkins. "Students get rowdy, line up
on the balconies of the motels and
create unsafe business with their
drunken behavior.
DAYTONA BEACH residents
tolerate the extra traffice and added
problems which occur every March
because they bring tourist dollars into
the city.
The memo outlines local traffic and
beach safety regulations, including a
rule that no balls or frisbees can be
thrown across traffic lanes-a law
aimed primarily at students.
Motor cycle safety rules and local or-
dinances concerning hitchhiking, lit-
tering, pets, camping, soliciting or
trespassing on private motel beaches
were also included in the memo.

V -M

Court nixes appeal
by expelled student

WASHINGTON (AP) - Students ex-
pelled from school for academic rather
than disciplinary reasons have no con-
stitutional right to defend themselves in
a pre-dismissal hearing, the Supreme
Court ruled yesterday.
The court's decision overturned an
order by the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court
of Appeals that Charlotte Horowitz be
reinstated as a student in the Univer-
sity of Missouri's Medical School at
Kansas City.
HOROWITZ was expelled from the
school in 1973 just five days before she
was to graduate because of complaints
about her "clinical competence, peer
and patient relations, personal hygiene
and the ability to accept criticism."
She had been on probation for all of
her senior year, even though she en-
tered the year as the top-ranked student
in class studies.
In her lawsuit against the school,
Horowitz charged her due-process
rights were denied when she was not
given a full-blown hearing before her
dismissal.

A trial court ruled in favor of the
universitycbutthe appeals court said
Horowitz was right. That order was
held in abeyance while the nation's
highest court reviewed the case.
Robotics:
Shape of
the future w
(Continued from Page 1)

I U

the ann arbor film coo e tive presents:
THURSDAY, ARCH 2
PROVIDENCE
(A lain Resnais, 1977) 7 & 9:30-AUD. A
Resnais' latest, made in England, offers a dazzling probe into the creative imagina-
tion of a dying writer. Extraordinary performances given by John Gielgud and
Dirk Bogarde. The film that Milos Forman calls "touching, beautiful and surpris-
ing," that Anthony Burgess calls "a great masterpiece," and that Susan Sontag
calls "brilliant and unforgettable." With ELAINE STRITCH, ELLEN BURSTYN,
and DAVID WARNER. In French, with subtitles. ANN ARBOR PREMIERE.
Plus Short: GUERNICA (A lain Resnais, 1950)
A study of Picasso's painting of the Spanish Civil War, with Paul Eluard's poetry
as narration. "GUERNICA represents for the director the first totally successful
fusion of all the elements on which his mature style is based."-Roy Armes.
Friday: Ken Russell's WOMEN IN LOVE

COUPON

3. 754

Dissertation
and
Theses
Special

said. "Robots have created much more
work than they have displaced," he
said. "It is rather difficult for a robot to
find work in (our) robot manufacturing
plant."
ENGELBERGER said researchers
are focusing on the development of bet-
ter visual and tactile senses in robots,
in addition to the man-robot communi-
cation and safety problems. As robots
get sophisticated they would work more
closely with humans, he said, and
people would want to be safe from a
"slave uprising."
"We've never harmed a human
being," he insists. "Robots always obey
Isaac Asimov's first law of robotics
(that a robot shall not hurt a human
being, either directly or through inac-
tion), because they don't have any
choice."
Engelberger says he forsees a time
when robots would be doing the garden-
ing, baby-sitting and household chores.
"But," shrugged the roboticist, "it'll be
a long, cold day before we'll see that
happen."

4.

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POETRY READING
with
CARRY GOLDSTEIN and JED COHEN

readings from their works
Thursday, March 2-7:30
at GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE (corner of Oakland)

Refreshments

J

Paid Adver

L

I

hb.-

'OOD

FOk THOUGHT
eibet1erg
RESTAURANT

0

featurin~

t

Dine, drink, dance and be merry;
that is owner Fritz Kochendorfer's
motto for the Heidelberg. A master
butcher by trade, Fritz has recreated
the warm, friendly atmosphere of a
German family restaurant, here in Ann
Arbor. For almost 17 years the
Heidelberg has offered good food and
lots of it.
Something is always happening at
215 N. Main St. The Heidelberg
Rathskeller is the perfect place for an
after dinner drink, or intimate conver-
sation. Every Tuesday thru Friday
from 4-6 pm you can enjoy their two-
for-one cocktail hour. For music and
entertainment an easy listening folk
band plays Friday and Saturday
evenings from 9 pm-2 am. On Satur-
day eves a rousing German band has'
everyone from 18 to 80 joining in the
fun upstairs in the Heidelberg's Wine
Room.
If you enjoy eating and can op-
preciate a finely cooked meal then the
Heidelberg s the place to go. Each
selection is prepared with the same
fine attention to seasoning and attrac-
tive presentation. The cheerful
waitresses, costumed in native Ger-
man attire, add to the convivial at-
mosphere of hospitality.
Each day's menu presents a dif-
ferent list of German specialties along
with the already extensive Ger-
man/American selections. A complete
dinner is not only reasonably priced,
but offers generous servings. Start
your meal off with a traditional Ger-
man appetizer of assorted sausages,
or soup. The Goulash Soup, crowded
with chunks of ground beef, and the
Jaeger Soup, a mildly seasoned brown
mushroom stock, are both excellent.
Entrees range from the hearty German
Sauerbraten marinated in wine vinegar

and spices, the rouladen, a superb
combination of roast beef, bacon,
Swiss cheese and spices, the delec-
tably spiced Wiener Schnitzel a la
Hollstein to such specialties as Jumbo
Shrimp in Beer batter, London Broil,
fried chicken, frog legs, or roast
duckling with orange sauce. All are
gastronomic experiences!
Dinners include a choice of potatoes
or spatzele, which are small German
dumplings, tossed salad, fresh onion
and pumpernickel rolls and coffee.
Their sausages are imported from a
traditional German-style sausage fac-
tory.
After, sampling the Heidelberg's
desserts it is not an overstatement to
say that no meal is complete without
Apple Strudel a la mode or their ex-
pecially creamy cheesecake. The
strudel is in itself a delight. Imported
frozen from Hungary, it is baked on
the premises to create one of the
crutiest, most delicious strudels I
have ever eaten; and I have sampled
many!
For luncheon or anytime, the menu
also offers a wide variety of omelet-
tes as well as hot and cold san-
dwiches, including the sumptuous
German Reuben. Tuesday-Friday a
luncheon buffet is offered downstairs
for only $1.85 per person. Salads,
German and American cold cuts,
cheeses and two different hot entrees
form this afternoon buffet.
For lunchtime, dinner, cocktails or
anytime the wine list has a respec-
table selection of vintages to com-
plement any meal. Special German
cocktails and hot spiced port are also
highly recommended. Irish coffee or
the German cordial Joegermeister are
both delicious to relax with after din-
ner.

The Heidelberg embodies traditional
German hospitality in Old World
surroundings. The beamed ceilings and
hand-painted murals of Germany help
create an atmosphere of the German
countryside while miscellaneous beer
steins, cuckoo clocks, hand carved
wooden heads and on authentic
cowbell accent the Alpine dining room.
The bar resembles a chalet-like struc-
ture complete with carved wood
cutouts and shingled roof. Team
trophies crowd one end of the bar,
festimonies of baseball victories and
the successful mayor's cup soccer
teams sponsored by the Heidelberg. A
simulated waterfall gently trickles
over stones in another secluded corner
of the dining room.
For fine dining, hearty luncheons,
pleasant evening entertainment or
just casual conversation, the
Heidelberg has a place for you. Almost
everyone can find a niche for them-
selves in either the Wine Room, Alpine
Room or Rathskeller. Open Tuesday
through Saturday from 11 am to 11
pm and Monday from 5 pm to 10 pm,
the Heidelberg is an experience
waiting for you nearby in downtown
Ann Arbor. There's plenty of parking
in back and lots of room inside so try
the Heidelberg soon and bring your
friends.

THE LORD FOX
Dinner Hours 4-10 p.m. 668-9387
Featuring Ann Arbor's largest selection of fresh seafoods,
steaks, and wines. Special flambeed desserts. Old-fashioned
hospitality striving for a balance of American and Continental
dishes.
NO RESERVATIONS REQUIRED
1 ' miles east of US 23 on Plymouth Rd.
Allyoicaneat...45_
Full dinner... including
Bar-B-Que Beef Ribs, Pan-
Fried Fresh Perch, Pineapple
Baked Ham, Broiled Sea
Scallops, Southern Fried Chick-
en, Fresh Great Lakes Smelt, Gathering Place
Veal Parmesan, Home-made
Lasagna, and Pan-Fried Frog Legs.
Plus, a great salad bar and fries S. University
or corn on the cob. near Washenaw
Saturday thru Thursday. Sun. 1-8pm. Sat. & Mon. -Thurs. 5-8:30 pm.

I.

I

PRETZEL BELL RESTAURANT
Corner of LIBERTY & FOURTH 1gII"''' . 761-1470
RFD Boys & "Footloose"
every Friday & _ Thursday
Saturday night 9-12
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT Specials
Sunday through Thursday
$4.40-includes Salad Bar
Delicious, Quality Food & Cocktails
Elegantly Prepared
Graciously Served

al

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Homemade S
Deli Sandwich
Unlimited Sal

'CCoD CHANCE
RESTAURANT.
Great Food at Righteous Prices
FEATURING:
oup * Steak8
hes " Compl
ad Ba . Cockta
1-9 S16 E.
~994-

Burgers
lte Dinners
ails
Liberty
5360

Mon.-Sat. I1
Sun. 4-9

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momamommm

Complete Italian-American Menu

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All You Can Eat Specials

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