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February 21, 1978 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1978-02-21

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The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, February 21, 1978-Page 3

UNIONS WITHOUT CONTRACT SINCE 1976;

*1
4

1F'tJUSEE NS ,S PEN CL."ADNA

Oakla
By SUE HOLLMAN

Monetary incentive
The Michigan Student Assembly is apparently very serious about
moving a large turnout for tomorrow's 9 a.m. start of the MSA special
election. The special election director Tim O'Neill has an added incen-
tive to get the vote out. O'Neill's contract calls for a basic salary off
$125, but if more than 1350 people vote in the election he will be paid an
additional $50. The MSA hopes this bonus provision will encourage
O'Neill to work extra hard in publicity and visibility on election day.
The MSA may have some trouble drawing a large electorate because
there are no candidates to publicize the election. The ballot consists
solely of two important referendum questions. Total budget for the
election is $800. Support your campus government and Mr. O'Neill by
voting tomorrow. The polling places are as follows: the Fishbowl in
Angell Hall, the Geddes bus stop, on North University across from Hill
Auditorium, on State Street across from the Union, just south of the
Engineering Arch on the corner of East and South University, and on
the corner of Monroe and Tappan. Later in the evening poll sites will
open at Markley, Bursley and South and East Quads as well as the.
Graduate and Undergraduate Libraries.
A decade ago.. ..
February 21, 1968: The Graduate Assembly (made up of Graduate
Student Assistants) passed a resolution calling for a "Day of
Deliberation" in March during which all students would boycott
classes for 24 hours to protest the war and the draft. The resolution
calls for thetime to be used for letures, workshops and study groups to
discuss the war.
0.
Happenings ..
if you wake up late for class and have to skip breakfast, take ad-
vantage of the Project Community Bake Sale that will be held in the
Fishbowl from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. . . the Sociocinema will show
"sharing the Land" and "No Hiding Place" in MLB Aud. 3 at noon and
4 p.m... . the Great Lakes Marine Environment Seminar will feature
Robert Thomann of Manhattan College speaking on the "Need for New
Directions in Water Quality Modelling" at 4 p.m..in 165 Chrysler Cen-
ter . .. Lemuel Johnson will present a poetry reading at 4:10 p.m. in
the Pendleton Room of the Union. . . the Ann Arbor National
Organization for Women will celebrate the 158th birthday of a great
feminist and leader of women's rights on February 21 with a presen-
tation of their annual Susan B. Anthony Awards at a pot luck dinner
which will be held from 6 until 9 p.m. at the First Unitarian Church,
1917 Washtenaw . .. Angus Archer, a non-governmental liasion of-
ficer at the United Nations will be speaking on international hunger at
Calvary United Methodist church at 7:30 p.m. .. . Jesse Bernstein,
chairperson of the Michigan Chapter of the National Association of
Social Workers Huron Valley Unit, will moderate a brief debate of the
issues surrounding the regulation of the social work profession at 7:30
in the Social Hall of St. Clair's Temple Beth Emeth on Packard Road
at Eastover-Jewett. . . Project Community is sponsoring a speech by
Doctor Ray Helfner on child abuse in room 435 Mason Hall at 7:30 p.m.
participants in the Ann Arbor Sierra -Club's Winter camping
Weekend, February 25-26, will meet at the home of Norman Roller,
1128 Miller Avenue, at 8p.m.... the University Varsity Band will per-
form in concert with conductor George Cavender and student conduc-
tor Marc Diekesy *at'8p.m. in Hill Auditorium free of charge . .. an
evening of South American music sponsored by the Ann Arbor Com-
mittee for Human Rights in Latin America will take place at the Ark
tonight at 9 p.m., a $2 donation to the committee is required.
Losing is winning
While many northern promotional contests feature trips to the sunny
Souther'n regions as grand prizes, one Floride radio station decided to
turn that line of thinking upside down. First, they decided not to have a
grand prize winner, but to have a loser instead. Second, because they
are already in the sunny southern regions, they decided to send one of
their sun-loving natives north. The great loss, they decided, was to
send a beach lover to snow country. So what better place could be
chosen than Buffalo, New York? Not so long famed for mammoth ac-
cumulations of snow, Buffalo rivals Oswego, New York, for the
greatest annual snowfall. Although the radio station was in a negative
train of thought with its prize, the winners, er, uh, losers, loved it. Jan
and Paul Marks of Lutz, Floida, were the grand losers inthe radio
stations "I Don't Want To Go To Buffalo Because. . ." contest. What
they met in Buffalo was no blizzard, but sunshine, gifts and attention.
The radio station declined to say why the Marks' didn't want to go to
Buffalo, but it did concede the Marks were "ecstatic" about their win,
er, uh, loss.
On the outside .. .
Although spring is officially 28 days away there is still a lot of winter
weather in store. A large upper air ridge of high pressure is stationary
over California and will continue to funnel down polar air. This ridge is
not expected to move much in the next six to ten days. Today will be a
continuation of frigid temperatures with some sunshine throughout
the day. High 21. Tonight partly cloudy with a low of 5. Temperatures
will be about the same the rest of the week. B-r-r-r-r-r

CINEMA I1 MLB3
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21
DONKEY SKIN
Director-JACQUES DEMY (1971)
CATHERINE DENEUVE stars in the role of a beautiful princess who is pursued
by her father-a man convinced that she is the only woman alive as beautiful
as his late wife. Enchantment and fantasy at its best. "A beginning jewel of
a movie."-Susan Stark.
78 9p.m. .$1.50
FRIDAY: Wilder's WITNESS FOR THE PROSECUTION

The emotion-charged strike at the
Oakland Press began its eighth week
yesterday amidst numerous reports of
slashed tires broken windows and
harassing phone calls.
Such incidents have resulted in the
installation of a 10-foot high barbed
wire fence around the building, surveil-
lance cameras on the picketers and the
hiring of at least 60 out-of-state "rent-a-
cdps" to patrol the area along with
Pontiac Police.
SEVERAL PICKETERS have been
arrested, on charges ranging from ag-
gravated assault to wearing a ski mask
on the streets, in violation of a state law
originally passed in response to activi-
ties of the Ku Klux Klan.
The strike, which began Dec. 29 and
involves 40 members of two unions, has
become almost a "class struggle"
against big business, according to one
striker.
The unions, Newspaper Guild Local
22 and Pressmen's Union Local 13, have
been picketing and conducting a sub-
scription cancellation campaign again-
st the Oakland Press, which is under
the management of Capitol Cities Com-
munications, Inc.
CAPITAL CITIES is a large, New
York based conglomerate which con-
Daily Official Bulletin
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 21
Day Calendar: e
Electrical, Computer Eng.: J. Cassidy, General
Motors Research Lab., "Recent Advances in Elec-
tronic Automotive Control: Overview, Computerized
Testing Facilities, Microcomputer Applications,"
2080 E. Eng., 9 a.m.
Project Community: Bake sale - Fish Bowl, 8
a.m.-2 p.m.
Ecumenical Campus Ctr./Int'l Ctr.: "Prostitution
Issue in Ann Arbor." Int'l Ctr.. 603 E. Madison. noon.
Bioengineering: S. Ford, Sarns Inc.. lAstruments
for Extracorpeal Bypass during Open Heart
Surgery," 1042 E.E., 4 p.m.
Great Lakes, Marine Environment Seminar: Robt.
V. Thomann, Manhattan College, "Need for New
Directions in Water Quality Modelling," 165 Crysler,
4 p.m.
English: Lemual Johnson, poetry reading, Pen-
dleton Rm., 4:10 p.m.
Music School: Varsity Band, Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
Musical Society: Eliot Feld Ballet, Power Ctr., 8
p.m.
UAC Viewpoint: Barry Commoner, environmen-
talist, "Carter's Crisis: Eneergy of Economics?"
RackhamAud.,8p.m.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVII, No. 1I8
Tuesday, February 21, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. Second class
postageaisapaid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. Subscription rates:
$12 September through April(2 semesters); $13 by
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

i

nd Press
trols fourteen radio stations including
WJR-Detroit, Women's Wear Daily,
The Kansas City Star and Times and
several other newspapers and publica-
tions nationwide.
The Pressmen first went on strike
when the paper suddenly brought in
people from the Kansas City Star to be
trained who did not have to join the
Union, Foley said. The Pressmen had
been bargaining for a new contract sin-
ce Jan. 1976.
The Newspaper Guild, who had been
bargaining for a new contract since
May 1976, officially went on strike soon
after the Pressmen.
STRIKERS CLAIM that since Capitol
Cities took over the Oakland Press in
1969, the company has insisted on elim-
inating cost of living provisions, cutting
sick leave and no job security for Guild
members in the new contracts.
According to Foley, Guild members
have gone without a wage increase sin-
ce 1975.
OAKLAND PRESS strikers claim
Capitol Cities has built a reputation for
breaking up unions at their other news-
papers and is attempting to do so at this
one.
DENIS FOLEY, unit chairman of the
Newspaper Guild, claims Capitol Cities
"made a mistake taking on a union in a
union town."
Soon after the strike began, Bruce
McIntyre, the paper's publisher, in a
comment to the Detroit Free Press said
that the company was "prepared for a
Long strike" and that they had a "law
enforcement problem" instead of a
"manpower problem."
When contacted yesterday, McIntyre
refused to respond to inquiries about
.the charges made by the unions and ef-
fects of the strike. According to McIn-
tyre, the unions were "repeating the
same lies they said two months ago and
it's really not in my interest to com-
ment on them."
OTHER REPRESENTATIVES of the
Oakland Press and Capitol Cities also
refused any comment.
A week after the strike began, the
strikers each received a letter from
McIntyre informing them that they had
been "permanently replaced." The
company then proceeded to hire new
workers, mainly from other Capitol
Cities papers, to fill vacant positions.
According to .Foley, the unions of-
fered binding arbitration right after the
strike began but the company refused.
BOTH THE UNITED Auto Workers
(UAW) and the AFL-CIO have pledged
their full support of the strike and four
THE HIGHANDS
1 and 2 bedroom apartments
includes security lock system, drapes,
dishwasher, lighted tennis courts, and
pool
Buses to and from campus daily
1693 Broadway, Apt. 302
769-3672
Reaume and Doddes Management Co.

strike drags on
UAW members are being paid by the says Foley, although the strike has
Union to work full-time on the effort. been "a constant emotional surge up
Despite growing support, Foley says and down."
the styike has been "no picnic." However, Foley comments, "it's
Strikers receive between $50-$70 per nothing but cold reality when you see a
week for support from Union funds. new by-line covering the beats you used
They remain "determined to win," to do."

SEVERAL MEMBERS OF the Newspaper Guild Local 22 and Pressman's Local 13
picket outside offices of the OAKLAND PRESS in Pontiac, Michigan. The -m-
ployes claim that the newspaper and Capitol Cities Communications, Inc., who
manages the OAKLAND PRESS, are trying to break up the unions.

r

The Office of
Major Events Presents

ICONCERT
JIMMY
BUFFETI
And

- ,
. . ..
.

i
i

The CORAL REEFER BAND
FRIDAY, MARCH 24TH - 8:00 PM
HILL AUDITORIUM (Ann Arbor)
RESERVED TICKETS $7.50 - $6.50 & $5.50
TICKETS ON SALE TOMORROW!
(No Personal Checks Please!)
AUTHORIZED TICKET OUTLETS:
MICHIGAN UNION BOX OFFICE (Ann Arbor) ALL HUDSON'S
HUCKLEBERRY'S PARTY STORE (YPSILANTI)
FO R IN FO. CA L L 763-2071
MAIL ORDER INFORMATION: Send self-addressed, stamped
envelope along with certified check or money order only, to:
JIMMY BUFFETT, MICHIGAN UNION BOX OFFICE, ANN
ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48109
Smoking & Beverages Strictly Prohibited in Hill Auditorium

i
.

F

F

FM kIVFNSITY C MUSICAL 8OCIETY presen t,s

..

A leksander
S lobodyanik

., The No. 1 Rock-n-Roll Disco
737 N. Huron
(at Lowell, just east of the E.M.U. Campus)
1. . __ . ,u

I

Saturday's recital marks the Ann Arbor debut
of this outstanding young Soviet pianist,
who is on his seventh U.S. tour. Praised
by the N.Y. Times as a "virtuoso" with a
+./A41/ i , A-7I \/ 'G L.... A tLI. t

Saturday,

February 25

at 8:30
Rrirkhnm Auitnriiim

I

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