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February 21, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-21

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Page 2-Tuesday, February 21, 1978-The Michigan Daily

Final decision expected
on Samoff tenure denial

By MITCH CANTOR
Assistant Political Science Professor
Joel Samoff's future at the University
may finally be settled when the
Political Science Department's tenured
faculty members meet today to review
their decision to deny Samoff tenure.
The Political Science Executive
Committee met yesterday to hear
Samoff defend the appeal he had
previously submitted to the committee,
but the group decided instead that the
controversy must be reviewed by the
tenured faculty on the basis of an offer
made by the Center for Afro-American
and African Studies (CAAS).
ACCORDING TO COMMITTEE
MEMBER Oscar Morales, the Center
offered to pay half of Samoff's salary
for the next year if he stays at the
University, whether he's granted
tenure or not.
Morales emphasized that the offer,
made in January of this year, was not a
ploy by the Center to try to get tenure
for Samoff.
"This was offered as a proposal to

show that he (Samoff) is very import-
ant to the Center. It was not in the light
that he wouldn't get the tenure, but that
he would."
BOB GURSS, the undergraduate rep-
resentative on the committee, said,
"The tenured faculty will be asked to
take another look at consideration
based on that information."
Committee members said they met
with Samoff for 90 minutes.
"It was an informal discussion strict-
ly concerning the matter of his
(Samoff's) appeal," said one commit-
tee-member.
GURSS SAID that Samoff would not
have been granted the review had it not
been for the CAAS offer. However, he
was quick to add that the re-recommen-
dation by the executive committee
wasn't to pressure the tenured faculty.
"It wasn't a last gasp to force
something down the department's
HOW SWEET IT WAS
LOS ANGELES (AP) - No offensive
lineman ever forgets scoring a touch-
down, not even a star in the pro game.
Tom Mack, the crack Los Angeles
Ram guard, still savors the eight points
he put on the scoreboard while playing
for Cleveland Heights High in a game
against Euclid. Mack was an end in
those days.
"Somebody blocked a punt," Tom
recalled, "and I fell on it for a touch-
down. That was six points and then I
added two more by catching a pass on
the conversion. We won that game, 8-
0."

throat. I undoubtedly would like to see
Samoff approved, and hopefully, it will
happen tomorrow," he said last night.
Gurss also said that the presence of
Political Science Professor Ali Mazrui
at the meeting today may sway some
votes for Samoff. Mazrui was only
present for approximately half the
debates during the initial Samoff tenure
hearing.
SAMOFF, WHO has been at the
University since fall, 1970, will have to
leave within a year if he is ultimately
rejected tenure.
Known for his expertise in South
African affairs and political economy,
Samoff has long been controversial,
causing him to be labelled by some as a
"Marxist Political Economist." Yet he
has drawn praise from many for his
teaching ability.
"LAST YEAR Samoff was nominated
for the campus-wide teaching award,"
Gurss said. "This year no such nomina-
tion was made (for Samoff) even
though it was suggested at times."1/2
Though Samoff was recommended
for tenure by the committee in Novem-
ber, he was rejected on the grounds that
his research was not up to Michigan
standards.
Literary College Dean Billy Frye,
who said he was concerned over the
controversy in the Samoff case, invited
the committee and the tenured faculty
to review all tenure decisions, which
prompted yesterday's and today's
meetings.
Several members of the executive
committee, including Chairman Sam
Barnes, could not be reached for com-
ment. Samoff was also unavailable for
comment.

INSTANT
CASHI'
WE'RE PAYING
$1 -$2 PER DISC
FOR YOUR ALBUMS,
IN GOOD SHAPE.
RECORDS
OPEN MON.-SAT. 10-6
209 S. STATE
769-7075

AP Photo
Beautiful, but deadly
This beautiful but deadly cavern was formed by ice when water levels dropped at Winton Woods lake in suburban
Cincinnati. Three youths were killed Saturday while playing in one of the caverns. The icy overhang, which rose
three feet above the water, broke off over the boys, crushing them.

Laurence Oliver in 1940's
PRIDE AND
PREJUDICE
The most urbane of novels trans-
lated into the most elegant of
films. Flawless acting by GREER
GARSON, MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN and
OLIVER before he became a Sir.
WED.: HOLLYWOOD ON TRIAL
* THURS.: COVER GIRL &
BROADWAY MELODY OF 1940
Old Arch. Aud.
Tonight at 7:00 & 9:05
$1.50
_.

JOURNEY BECOMES NIGHTMARE:

MSU student

jailed in Israel

.S

C

By DAN OBERDORFER
Last December 21, a Michigan State
University graduate student named
Sami Esmail set out to visit his dying
father in Israel. But his journey was in-
terrupted when he was arrested soon
after stepping off the plane at Lod air-
port outside Tel Aviv.
Esmail - an American citizen - is
still in the custody of Israeli authorities.
He has been charged with "member-
ship in an illegal organization, (the
Popular Front for the Liberation of
Palestine)," and with having "contact
with an enemy agent," according to
Dan Kyram, a spokesman for the Con-
sulate of the Israeli embassy in
Chicago.
ESMAIL pleaded innocent to the
charges at a preliminary hearing last
Monday. Under Israeli law, the MSU.
electrical engineering student can be
sentenced for a maximum of ten years
behind bars, if convicted by a three-
judge Israeli court, according to
PA.

Kyram.
"This is a political trial and I believe
the Israelis want to make an example of
him (Esmail) to members of other
Palestinian organizations," said
Esmail's lawyer in the U.S., Abdeen
Jabara.
According to Felicia Langer, his at-
torney in Israel, Esmail has been tor-
tured while awaiting trial.
"They said that they will arrest the
rest of his family and beat them in front
of him. . . He was compelled to carry a
chair in his hands, and the in-
terrogators were spitting in his face,"
she wrote the American Embassy in
Tel Aviv.
"IT IS important to reveal to public
opinion what Israeli police do and their
repeated violations of rights as can be
confirmed by thousands of prisoners in
Israeli jails," Esmail said in an "open
letter to all my friends."
Kyran said that Esmail has "abso-
lutely not" been tortured, but "he may
have been questioned extensively
though."
The U.S. State Department, which
has followed the case closely, has asked
the Israeli government to conduct an
investigation to determine if Esmail
has indeed been tortured, according to
a spokesman in Washington. However,
he said that embassy officials who have
visited Esmail in prison report that his
health appears "all right."
In the U.S., Sami Esmail has begun to

receive national attention. Last week, a
committee from the National Lawyers
Guild recommended that Ernest Good-
man, a civil rights lawyer from Detroit,
be dispatched to keep an eye on the
trial. Goodwnln said he is concerned the
trial "appears to be a political trial."
IN EAST LANSING, where "Sami
Esmail" has developed into the hottest
political issue on campus, the
headquarters for the National Commit-
tee to Defend the Human Rights (NC-
DHR) of Sami Esmail has staged
several rallies attracting as many as
500 people.
"It was very hard for us to learn of
Sami's ordeal. He was very well-liked
by his fellow students and teachers ...
the Israeli actions are a basic infringe-
ment on his constitutional rights as an
American citizen," said Rick Greene,
co-chairman of the Committee.
An Ann Arbor chapter of the NCDHR
- one of eleven scattered throughout
the nation - recently opened and now
boasts of six to eight members, accor-

ding to chairwoman Lisa Katz. The
group is planning to bring Esmail's at-
torney in the U.S., Jabara and Basim
Esmail, to Ann Arbor Thursday night to
explain the case at the Wesley Founda-
tion on Huron Street.
Esmail

Work With Kids at

CAMP TAMARACK
Brighton and Ortonville, Michigan
Jobs for counselors, specialists, supervisors,
staff, nurses, caseworkers and long trip bus

Faculty senate finds
Baker inconclusive

kitchen
drivers.

INTERVIEWING FEBRUARY 27
SUMMER PLACEMENT OFFICE
Call 763-4117 for an appointment. Camp Tamarack is the
Jewish tresidential camp sponsored by the Fresh Air Society,
6600 W. Maple Rd., W. Bloomfield, MI 48033-661-0600.
Please call or write us for an application or additional infor-
mation.

the tnn arbor film co-operative
presents at ANGELL HALL
Tuesday, February 21
ENTER THE DRAGON
(Robert Clouse, 1974) 7, 8:40, 10:20
This THE finest of all Bruce Lee epics. John Saxon, Fred Williamson, and the
greatest Zen martyr to Killer Karate, Bruce Lee. Follow Adventure's Trail to
the veiled Orient-and to the ultimate contest with consummate players.
America invented violence in the movies; Bruce Lee makes it balletic. Cinema-
scope.
Tomorrow: Bruno Der Schwartze at 7 only
Cria at 9 only

(Continued from Page 1)
campus-wide effort is much too com-
plicated to come up with an Accurate
estimate.
Baker also mentioned at the meeting
that women or minorities who had been
turned down for tenure or promotion
would have their cases investigated to
determine whether discrimination had
played a role in the personnel decision.
Baker said after the meeting that
there had not been enough time to gt in-
to some of the more involved un-
derlying issues of .affirmative action,
but added that she would be willing to,
meet with interested members of the
Senate some time in the future to
discuss these aspects.
SHE ADDED that the University
"will act affirmatively to recruit more
women and minorities for staff
positions. She said that there would be
analyses of the salaries and departure
rates of these groups.

APRIL
GRADS!
Commencement
will be held on
April 28, 1978
ALL CAP & GOWN orders MUST
BE PLACED BY MARCH 29
LATE ORDERS$are subject to
availability and $2 late fee.

In other Assembly action, chairman
of the civil liberties committee Bruce
Friedman opened a discussion of
proposed guidelines for studnt
evaluations of courses and faculty
members, SACUA turned down an MSA
member's request for support for a
proposal for a non-voting student mem-
ber of the Board of Regents. One of the
main disagreements SACUA members
had with the plan was that it could set
precedents for other groups concerned
with the University to seek seats on the
Board.
WILD HORSES
CAUGHT
LITCHFIELD, Calif. (AP) - Fifty
wild horses and a yourn mule that had
once roamed the high desert country
near here were recently captured in a
helicopter-aided roundup.
They will be placed in new homes un-
der the U.S. Bureau of Land Manage-
ment's "Adopt A Horse" program.
The roundup was held to reduce the
numbers of wild horses and burros
which officials said were over-
populating the two million acres of
range in the BLM's Susanville District.
Under the adoption program, the ani-
inals will remain the property of the
federal government, which will be
responsible for their treatment and
care.

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