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February 19, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-19

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Page 2-Sunday, February 19, 1978-The Michigan Daily
MSA constitutional amendments
slated for student ratification

(Continued from Page 1)
ts approve it. One MSA official said if
CSJ turns down this plan if it is passed
by students, MSA may take measures
against CSJ. MSA has the power to
remove CSJ members, although this
power has only been exercised once. In
that instance, CSJ threw off school and
college representatives after declaring
their proportioning unequal. MSA then
removed CSJ and the new CSJ mem-
bers agreed to let the school and college
reps remain in MSA until the next elec-
tion.
THE OTHER PROPOSED amen=
dment calls for the direct election of the
MSA president and vice-president by
students. They are presently elected by
MSA members. Supporters of the plan

say a directly elected president ana
vice-president would generate more
student interest in MSA elections,
which have reached alarming lows in
student turnout. In the last election less
than five per cent of eligible students
voted.
"Hopefully, the election would
feature things like debates," said
DiGiuseppe, sponsor of the proposed
amendment.
"It (direct election) helps to
eliminate needless factionalism," said
Gibson, referring to the intensive effor-
ts by presidential aspirants to obtain
support from members of the Assem-
bly.
THE RESPONSIBILITY for electing
the president was transferred from the
students to MSA when MSA was estab-
lished from the now-defunct Student

Government Council several years ago.
It was hoped the move would make the
president more responsive to the As-
sembly.
Polling sites will open at about 9 a.m.
Wednesday, according to election
director Tim O'Neill.
Students may vote at the following
locations:
* The fishbowl in Angell Hall
" Geddes bus stop
" Across from Huron Valley National
Bank on N. University
" Across from the Union on State
Street.
* Just south of the Engin. Arch (cor-
ner of E. and S. University)
" Corner of Monroe and Tappan
At about noon, the above balloting
station with the fewest votes cast will
be moved to E. University St. near the
Physics and Astronomy Building.
At 4:00, O'Neill will begin moving bal-
Swim.
Just for the
health of it.
Physical Education Public Information
American Alliance fr Health
Physical Education and Recreation
1201 161h St N W Washington. D C 20036

Take me
to your party.
Free.
I'm the new Bose Model 360 Direct/Reflecting
Component Music System, and I'm available. For
your party. Free.
Call your Bose Campus Manager (you'll find the
number below), and make the arrangements. You'll
find you get the most powerful sound you've ever
heard out of my bookshelf-size speakers. Clear, clean,
extraordinarily life-like sound. Now, I don'twantyouto
think I'i n i cheap, but for your party, I'm absolutely free.
Direct/Reflecting* speakers shape the sound to fht your room,
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I@

loting equipment to the following loca-
tions:
* South and East Quads, Markley
and Bursley residence halls
" Graduate and undergraduate
libraries
THE VOTING procedure will be dif-
ferent for this election than in previous
elections.
O'Neill said voters will be required to
complete two sheets. On one, the
student's ID number and academic unit
will be recorded. This computer sheet
will be run through a computer to
detect students who voted twice or who
are not actually enrolled in the Univer-
sity~-
Only in this case will the iden-
tification sheet and the actual ballot be
matched. Names of such illegal voters
will be turned over to CSJ, said O'Neill.
"You want to know who it was, who
committed the crime," said O'Neill.
Student government at Michigan has
a history of ballot fraud.'
Uncertified election results should be
available by Thursday evening, said
O'Neill. CSJ must certify the results
before they become official.
Carter ai*
to lend sui
been acting director of the Office of
Management and Budget (OMB) since
Lance resigned under fire in Septem-
ber. As acting OMB head, McIntyre
was responsible for packaging the 1979
budget, Carter's first full budget since
taking office.
THE CONTROVERSIAL budget has
been rapped even by members of his
own party. Private business does not
think the program offers sufficient incen-
tives, and the National Urban League
has complained the budget ignores
public works.
"Ours is a budget that addresses the
nation's most critical needs," McIntyre
said. "This is not a stand-pat budget. It
is anything but. It not only addresses
our human and social needs, it does
plenty about them."
McIntyre said the Carter budget
would increase spending for social ser-
vices by $24 billion.
McINTYRE ALSO gave the Michigan

AP Photo
Not sold on Carter
This demonstrator was but one of several anti-Panama Canal treaty protestors
Carter met during his two day trip through northern New England. Carter had
organized some "Town Meetings" at which he hoped to be able to sell the treaties
to the people. The trip ended yesterday.
de rallies Democrats
)Port for 1979 budget

Our
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Democrats a glimpse at the Carter
"Urban Plan" to be unveiled sometime
next month. The plan will probably-give
the central cities some flexibility as to
how to spend federal dollars, as McIn-
tyre emphasized "problems which your
own city faces aren't necessarily those
which other big cities face."
"We have come to an understanding
that there is no single set of urban
problems relevant to all cities," McIn-
tyre said.
The budget director hinted the "Ur-
ban Plan" may entail a "partners in
development" approach. "This ap-
proach would encourage the in-
volvement of community groups and
volunteer organizations and put
significant pressure on the private sec-
tor," he said.
McINTYRE COUPLED his defense
of the new budget with a ringing endor-
sement of his boss, praising the
president's "bold initiatives."
"The president isn't one to forget his
campaign promises and isn't a man who
evades the hard, tough issues and
problems facing the country," McIn-
tyre said. "He has not been timid or
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXVIII, No. 117
Sunday, February 19, 1978
is edited and managed by students at the University
of Michigan. News phone 764-0562. second class
postage isapaid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.
Published daily Tuesday through Sunday morning
during the University year at 420 Maynard Street,
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109. subscription rates:
$12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by g
mail outside Ann Arbor.
Summer session published Tuesday through Satur-
day morning. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor;
$7.50 by mail outside Ann Arbor.

reticent about seeking solutions for;
those problems. The president's bold-'
ness is justified by the magnitude of the
problems this country faces. Boldness
has been in the service of prudence."
McIntyre reiterated an old Carter'
theme, saying "lessons of the past tell:
us that massive amounts of money do
not necessarily solve the problems that
our cities face."
The economic advisory council to the
Michigan Democratic Party gives ad
vice to Democratic elected officials
about which course of action would im-
prove the state's economic climate.:
Members of the advisory council'-in-
lude University Regents Paul BrownRda
Robert Nederlander, and Thomas
Roach, who is also on the executive
committee. Other members of the
council include education school Dean
Wilburn . Cohen and economics
professor William Haber.

Center for Afr Ameriden A African Studies
presents a
FLACK HISTORY WEEK CELERATION
Featuring the
INDIANA UNIVERSITY
SOUL REVUE
The Indiana University Soul Revue is a musical group consisting of 45
university students who play contemporary Afro-American Music
SUNDAY, 7:00 P.M. FEBRUARY 19, 1978
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE ADMISSION FREE

-_----__
" ." r
e

HE HIT RIGHT KEY
WASHINGTON (AP) - Christoa
pher Sholes, the inventor whose type
writer helped win women millions of
jobs along with economic self-suffi-
ciency, was born in February, mar;
ried in February and died, on Feb. 19,
1890.
Attempts to invent writing, mat
chines were many and unsuccessful
-until Sholes and his two associated
patented the first commercially
practical "type-writer" in 1868, ac
cording to Intellectual Property
Owners, Inc., the non-profit group
dedica ted to preserving the Ameri-
pan patent system.
Five years later, after making over
50 different models and obtaining
numerous other patents on them,
Sholes sold his rights to the Reming-
ton Arms Co., which further im-
proved the machine and introduced it
on the market. Continuing to perfect
the machine for Remington, Shole$
wrote that "he was gratified to havq
done something for women, who have
always had to work so hard," IPC
reports.
Mark Twain was an early purchas"
er of a Sholes-Remington Typea
Writer, as it was called.
Nil Rai{

Campus Manager:

PHIL MERDINGER
Tel. No. 994-5883

IU

",4ii.

DONT GET CAUGHT UNDER A RAIN CLOUD-
ADVERISE YOUR SUMMER SUBLET NOW!

I1P~ t

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umnner ..
ublet Print or Type legibly in
t ithe space provided,
BatI upplenment the copy as you would
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(ACTUAL SIZE OF AD)
NAME _
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PHONE
Mail or Bring in Person with payment to:
420 MAYNARD STREET'
MAKE CHECKS PAYABLE TO: THE MICHIGAN DAILY'
ONLY $8 before5:OO.m.March3 , 1978

/

...aaum

pUUes CHAnCE
pr'sen"

Thursday, February 23 at 7:00 and 11:00
Advanced tickets $6.50, $7.50.ot the door, Available at Second
Chance and the Michigan Union.
Tickets go on sale Tuesday afternoon

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516 E. LIBERTY

994-5350

'4'

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A

Study in London and Stockholm
SUMMER OF '78
COMPARATIVE HEALTH SYSTEMS
July -A'ug. 27.1976
1. mm tc

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