100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 09, 1978 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-02-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily-Thursday, February 9, 1978-Page 5

AR TS ARCADE ... a weekly roundup

I

And what are
YOUR Wordsworth?
LONDON - British collectors are
making an eleventh-hour appeal for
cash to keep a bundle of passionate
love letters and other writings by the
English poet William Wordsworth
from being sent to America.
The deadline was Sunday. Jona-
than Wordsworth, the poet's great-
great-great-nephew, said his group
was close to agreement with Cornell
University but the deal is "not all
signed, sealed and delivered."
"We're extremely close to having
raised the money," Wordsworth said
in a telephone interview from his
Warborough village home. "We have
in fact made an offer to Cornell of
42,000 pounds (about $81,900). We
have reason to believe they are.going
to accept that figure."

Robson after the awards ceremony
at the Savoy Hotel Wednesday. "But
working on the cart I get a good line
for a play every day."
Global celebration
HONG KONG - At midnight
Monday, the Year of the Horse
replaced the Year of the Snake and
millions began lunar New Year cele-
brations in Hong Kong, China, Viet-
nam, Thailand, Korea, Burma and
Taiwan.
Tens of thousands of last minute
shoppers swarmed Hong Kong
streets into the night, while markets,
stores, and beauty shops extended
business hours to cope with the rush.
Most were fighting for time to round
up all the necessary Chinese New
Year goodies - candles, lotus seeds,
fruits and nuts, as well as new hair-

street dancers and other minor
parades lasted until Ash Wednesday
when the last weary and hungover
"Carnavalescos" staggered into the
lenten season.
NEW ORLEANS - Fourteen pa-
rades -rolled through the streets of
New Orleans last weekend culminat-
ing in Mardi Gras, or "Fat Tues-
day." The carnival festival was
highlighted by the four-hour Bacchus
Parade, named after the Greek god
of wine and revelry. It featured floats
two stories high and television per-
sonality Ed McMahon as Bacchus X,
saluting the thousands of carnival-
goers with a can of beer.
This year's festival got off to a slow
start due to unusually cold tempera-
tures, but the crowds improved with
the weather, and Tuesday's throng
exceeded the usual million-plus.

for a number of years, and I want to
make this my home.
"What attracted me was the air,
some people I know, and the general
atmosphere. I have a house with a
180-degree view of the water.
"And I'm going to make films the
way I used to. I have taken over a
Boeing airplane hangar I will use f'or
a couple of films I plan to make. I
have the financing from Mel Simon.
So'I can make the pictures the way I
want to."
"Yes, this is a departure for me.
But I've got two young kids with my
second marriage, and it's a good
time to get away from Hollywood and
find a set of values. Where does
everything fit? I want to get a line on
my life."
The Arts Arcade was compiled from the wires
of AP and UPI, and by Arts staffers Owen
Glieberman, Mark Johannson, Peter Manis,
Steve Pickover, Jeff Selbst, Mike Taylor and
Tim Yagle.

AP Photo
Chinese saddle up to a New Year A
The year of the Horse was celebrated in Peking February 6 in a splashy gala given
by the Peking Opera. Actress Yang Chiu-ling is shown center, with other members
of her troupe, all fancifully dressed, ushering in the New Year with a bang.

Gone with the match'
One of Atlanta's greatest structures was destroyed by fire
Monday. Loew's Grand Theatre had the honor of hosting the
world premier of the classic motion picture GONE WITH
THE WIND in 1939.
Arson is suspected as the cause of the fire, but the incident
is still under investigation. Damage is estimated at $2 billion,
and only several firemen were reported injured.
The historic building has been used recently for office
space as well as apartments. Reportedly, the only real
inhabitants were derelicts. The theatre had a long, illustrious
history dating back to 1893. Many a great star has perfomed
in the hall, which was used in later years for vaudeville.

Close Encounters of the Third Kind
helped pull Columbia Pictures from
the brink of bankruptcy, has lost his
job for the second time because of a
financial scandal that has shaken the
movie business. Columbia chairman
Leo Jaffe announced Monday that
Begelman had resigned effective
immediately because of continuing
"rumors and speculation" about the
way he handled corporate funds and
stars' money.
Columbia executives declined com-
ment Monday aboutrthe controversy,
refusing to elaborate on Jaffe's
statement or discuss whether Begel-
man had been forced out.
"That, my darling, you'll never
know!" said Jean Vagpini, Colum-
bia's public relations director.
Roman Polanski's judge says a
prison psychiatric report on the
director is "a complete whitewash"
and that Polanski should have been
imprisoned and deported for having
had sexual intercourse with a 13-
year-old girl. Superior Court Judge
Laurence Rittenbamd said Monday
that Polanski knew a harsh penalty
was in store when he fled the country
to avoid sentencing.
The'judge disclosed that he had
told Polanski's lawyer in advance
that he planned to send the director
back to the state prison in Chino for
48 days, then seek his voluntary
deportation from the United States.
If Polanski refuses to return, Ritten-
band said he would sentence him in
absentia.

Hooray, for Seattle!
HOLLYWOOD - One of the town's
best known filmmakers, Stanley
Kramer, is pulling up stakes to start
his own movie colony in Seattle.
Born in New York City, Kramer
has been an Angeleno for over 40
years. After he filmed Home of the
Brave on a shoestring in 1948, he
became famous for producing sound,
economically made films, often on
social themes. Champion, The Men,
Cyrano de Bergerac, High Noon,
Death of a Salesman, and The Caine
Mutiny.
Since Not as a Stranger, he has also
directed his films, not always on an
economical scale: The Pride and the
Passion, TherDefiantOnes, On the
Beach, Inherit the Wind, Judgement
at Nuremberg, It's a Mad, Mad,
Mad, Mad World.
His last big winner was the
Hepburn-Tracy-Poitier Guess Who's
Coming to Dinner? in 1967. After
months of preparing Raise the
Titanic for Sir Lew Grade, Kramer
departed over the usual "artistic
differences." Recently Hollywood
was surprised by reports that he was
leaving town.
"It's true," Kramer said over the
telephone from Seattle. "I sold my
house to Neil Diamond, and I'm
closing my office at Sunset-Gower
studio. I've owned property up here

HIGH VOLTAGE
ENTERTAINMENT!"
-William Glover, Associated Press
Rssel
ame
Lme,
eYar
!roadway's smash hit comedy

IAL?411H1
&luu
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
SUN., FEB., 26, 2 & 8pm

AP Photo

Cornell bought the collection last
July 7 at a Sotheby auction in London
for about $81,000, including Sotheby's
commission and an agent's fee. The
school planned to send the works to
its Ithaca, N.Y., campus where
scholars are editing a series of
Wordsworth volumes.
The collection, including 35 love
letters which Wordsworth wrote to
his wife, Mary, is considered aca-
demically valuable since it sheds
new- light on the couple's relation-
ship. The material came to light only
last year when a carpet-fitter came
across them in his storage shed.
* * *
No comment
LONDON - A 33-year-old garbage
collector has won a theater award as
the most promising playwright of
1977. Jim Robson, a sanitation work-
er in Kirby Moorside, Yorkshire, won
the annual Evening Standard Drama
Award for his play Factory Birds,
which has been running at the Royal
Shakespeare Company's Warehouse
Theater.
"My mates at work think my
writing's a bit of a laugh," said

cuts, clothes and shoes.
The three-day Asian holiday called
Tet "is somewhat like Christmas and
Western New Year rolled into one,"
the Vietnam News Agency said as the
Vietnamese heralded the new year
despite food shortages and a boarder
war with Cambodia.
RIO DE JANIERO, Brazil - About
20,000 dampish but undaunted samba
dancers shimmied their way through
the 1978 Rio Carnival grand parade
Sunday, despite a drenching summer
rainstorm.
The world-famous march of Rio's
10 greatest samba schools, the high
point of the four-day carnival, start-
el an hour late because of a storm
that deposited more than an inch of
rain on the city in 90 minutes.
But by the early hours, Rio's
brand-new, 800-yard-long "Samba-
drome" was dry except for a few
shallow puddles, and the 70,000
spectators, who paid $60 apiece to sit
in the rickety wooden grandstand
along the route, had seen thousands
of wriggling hips and heard hundreds
of high-powered percussionists.
The parade, a 16-hour marathon
competition, ended before noon, but

Crime in the arts
Movie producer David Begelnani,
whose talent for putting together
box-office hits like Shampoo and

POETRY READING
with
Richard McMullen, David Fox,
and David Oleshenski
-readings from their work-
Thursday, Feb. 9-7:30 p.m.
at GUILD HOUSE
Refreshments 802 Monroe (corner of Oakland)

TONIGHT
Open AMediinCas
Taught by STERN MORGAN, Psychic Healer
A different method of meditation covered each
week. People are welcome to attend regularly or
occasionally.
Begins each Thursday at 8 p.m.
Canterb Dsouse
218 North Div Sion Street

YOUR COLLEGE RING
FOR NOW AND THE FUTURE...

:' I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan