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January 08, 1978 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-08

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Page 2-Sunday, January 8, 1978-The Michigan Daily

HIS SIX CHILDREN ST ABBED TO DEA T H:

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Announcing Winter Series
The Howard R. Marsh Center for the Study of Journalistic
Performance will again sponsor a series of Wednesday brown
bag sessions to explore aspects of mass communication. All
are open to the public. Each will be 12:10 to 1:10 p.m. in
2040 F, LSA Building.
Jan.11 "The Italian Newsman and His Values," Pro-
fessor William E. Porter, Department of Journalism
Jan.25 "A Year Late and a Million Short: Case Study
in Educational Television," James Ettema,
doctoral student in mass communication program
Feb. a "The Newspaper Ombudsman," Robert May-
nard, former Washington Post ombudsman and
visiting Marsh professor
Feb. 22 "Problems of the Woman Journalist," Nancy
Hicks, former Washington correspondent for the r
New York Times and visiting Marsh professor
Mar.15 "The Small Town Publisher and Community
Standards," William Doolittle, NEH Fellow and
publisher of Adirondack Daily Enterprise in
Saranac Lake, N.Y.
Mar.29 "Journalism and Urban History," Professor
Marion T. Marzoff, Department of Journalism

Father charged in
ROCKFORD, Ill. (AP)-A 46-year-old father was death, Anderson said.
charged yesterday with "silently and methodically" Neighbors reported hearing no sounds,E
stabbing and beating his six sleeping children to said in describing the killings as "si]
death with a hunting knife and rubber-headed mallet, methodical."
One 15-year veteran police investigator called it He said a hunting knife and a large rubbe
"the worst mass murder in the history of the city and mallet were found in the home and were co
the most vicious murder I've ever seen, the death weapons.
ROCKFORD POLICE broke into Simon Nelson's NEIGHBORS told police that Mrs. Nelso
three-story stucco home here after Milwaukee police skating instructor, left Rockford severalc
notified them that Nelson was arrested in that city and moved into a Milwaukee motel. They
and charged with beating his estranged wife, Ann, 38. couple had had numerous arguments about
Mrs. Nelson reported to Milwaukee police that her failure to get a job. Police said Nelson rece
husband told her he had killed their chilfren, aged 3 to hired as a management counselor in Rockfor
12. the family lived for the past two years after
Five-year-old Roseann Nelson and her 12-year-old from Beloit, Wis.
sister Jennifer were found in their bed in a second- A Rockford police spokesman said the tin
floor bedroom, their heads bludgeoned and their children's deaths had not been firmly establi
bodies repeatedly stabbed. Their pet dog,ia it was believed they were slain within 24
dachshund, was in the bed, its throat slit, said police their discovery.
Capt. Richard Anderson. The girls' four Anderson said six counts of murder wf
brothers-Matthew, 7, Andrew, 9. Simon Jr., 10, and against Nelson, who was arrested in M
David, 3-were found in their third-floor bedroom, about 6:30 a.m. yesterday after neighbors
killed in a similar manner, Anderson said. Nelson's motel reported that she was being b
ONE OF the boys' bodies was found halfway out of In Milwaukee yesterday afternoon, Nelson
his bed, indicating he may have been the only one of extradition and tearfully told a Circuit Court
the children who had any warning if impending police headquarters, "I want to go home." Ti

killing spree
asked if Nelson understood that he would face mur-
Anderson der charges in Rockford, and Nelson replied that he
lent and did.
The judge asked if Nelson understood that convic-
r-headed tion of murder in Illinois is punishable by death, and
)nsidered Nelson asked to speak with an attorney. After con-
ferring briefly with officials of the Milwaukee County
n, an ice District Attorney's Office, Nelson reaffirmed his
days ago desire to waive extradition.
said the THE HEAVY-SET Nelson, wearing a T-shirt and
Nelson's blue and white striped bib overalls, signed a
ntly was statement agreeing to return to Rockford voluntarily.
d, where Officials said he probably would be brought here
r moving later in the day.
Friends and neighbors of the Nelsons were shocked
ne of the by the slayings. "Those sweet kids. It's just not be-
shed, but lievable," said Arlo Kanter, father of one of Mrs.
hours of Nelson's students. Kanter's 12-year-old daughter,
Lisa, was one of Jennifer Nelson's best friends.
ere filed Kanter said he paid frequent visits to the Nelson
ilwaukee home. He remembered one day last summer when
in Mrs. "we were all sitting out in the yard, Ann, the mother,
eaten. was gone, and the father seemed to be acting
n waived strangely. He was all wound up like a corkscrew. He
judge at acted like he just couldn't cope, whatever it was he
he judge was trying to cope with."

SOCIAL WORKERS " TEACHERS * PSYCHOLOGISTS
TIRED OF HEARING ABOUT'NO JOBS
AND NO SATISFACTION
IN YOUR CHOSEN PROFESSION?
Well if you have o Hebrew background, we invite
you to kiss that rut goodbye and soy hello to Israel.
If you are a social worker (MSW, BSW), teacher or
psychologist-or would like to be trained as a social worker, a
most exciting and personally-rewarding career awaits you in
the State of Israel. '
Interviews will be conducted in the United States. Contact us
immediately for pre-interview information session.
ISRAEL
25900 Greenfleid Rd., Suite 352
Oak Park, Mich. 48237
CENTER (313) 968-1044
There is much to be done by our generation in Israel. Let's stop
talking and start doing.

Energy policy limits
blacks, says NAACP

(Continued from Page 1)
to whatever rung of the economic
ladder they happen to be on.
"That's OK if you're a highly
educated 28-year-old making $50,000
a year as a presidential adviser,"
Wilson said. "It's utter disaster if
you're unskilled, out of work and
living in a ghetto."
Wilson's criticism marked the first
time the NAACP has linked its
traditional concern for jobs with the
Carter energy program, which calls
for limiting the growth of energy
consumption to two per cent a year =

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READ and USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
RAPHIC RTSlNT. YNION 289

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WELCOMES YOU TO ANN ARBOR'S
FIRST UNION COPY SHOP
The employees of Accu-Copy belong to G.A.I.U. local 289 and
won their first union contract for job security on December 11,
1977. The union workers of Accu-Copy unanimously ratified their
contract which contained the main objectives of the strike, job
security and a union shop clause and are anxious to provide their
expert services to you.
Show the world you are in support of the betterment of

M We'vebeen i
since 189(
haven't y(

reading

I

less than half the average annual
growth rate of the last 30 years.
"We're not against conservation . .
blacks have been turning down the
thermostat and turning off lights out
of economic necessity for years,"
Wilson said.
"But the administration's plan to
drastically limit the growth of the
nation's energy supply at a time
when unemployment among blacks
runs 14 per cent is very disturbing."
Wilson, a St. Louis attorney, said
there is a strong correlation between
energy growth and economic growth,
''and an annual growth rate of two
per cent makes it unlikely that the
current unemployment rate will drop
much at all.
"In fact," she said, "many econ-
omists say that a growth rate that
low jeopardizes the hard-won gains
of many blacks and other minorities
who managed to pull themselves up
to' middle-income status during the
la- decade or so."
The NAACP, which supported Car-
ter in his 1976 presidential bid,
submitted its own energy proposal to
the White House last month but has
yet to get a response.
Daily Official Bulletin
SUMMER PLACEMENT
3200SAB _7634117
Yale University, Dept. Engr. and Applied Scien-
ces: Announces their '78 Summer Research
Program for College Juniors, engr. sciences,
chemical, computer modeling, biomechanics, etc.
Further details available. Apps. deadline Feb. 13.
Nat. Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.: Announces
'78 Internship Program. Positions are at the Civil
Service, GS-5 level. Appointments effective June 19
to Sept: 1. Deadline for apps: Apr. 15.
Brookhaven Nat. Labs., Long Island, New York:
Summer Student Program, June 5 to Aug. 18. Must
have completed Junior year, graduating
seniors-biology, chemistry, engr., math., medicine,
etc. Details available.'Deadline for acceptance of
appts. Jan. 31.

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working people by
REMEMBER TO -...

supporting our local union shop. AND

ASK FOR THE ANION

IL7

ABEL 0 00

' IgVERSITY 5fMUSICAL0OCIETY presenti

G
A r
U c
LCLJ
LOCAL 289

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ACCU-COPY: 524 E. WILLIAM

Street !!!

You will receive the finest quality copies at low prices, reproduced
by union workers who " have been in the photo-copy business
longer than any employees at any other copy shop in Ann Arbor.
Experience and the pride of union workers makes the
difference in the good service you will receive at ACCU-COPY.
For union made OFFSET printing KOLOSSOS printing at
310 E. Washington can serve your offset needs.

ACC-U-COPY: phone

769-8338 !!!

FOR QUESTIONS YOU MAY HAVE ON YOUR RIGHTS
UNDER LABOR LAW TO ORGANIZE WITH YOUR FELLOW
EMPLOYEES AND SECURE UNION REPRESENTATION; or for
any other information you may need:
CALL: G.A.I.U. local 289, Ph. 345-5965 (area 313)

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