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January 18, 1978 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1978-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 8-Wednesday, January 18, 1978-The Michigan Daily
Flash! Empty seats

turning
By SCOTT M. LEWIS
"Here we are at jam-
Crisler Arena, home of the Mb
Wolverines basketball team.
thused sportscaster Curt Gov
January 8 at the Minnesota-Mi
game.
Jam-packed, eh, Curt?
A quick glance around Cri
that Sunday afternoon indicat
the basketball house was
,jam-packed." In fact, the
attendance fell at least one thi
short of capacity (13,609).
CSO WHERE ARE these
Michigan fans? Al Renfrew,
rmanager for athletic events
three reasons why attendan
gears to be down from last sea
-'First," explained Renfre
surprisingly large group o
would rather stand in the con
6d watch the game than siti
Ovn seats. This is why one find
dfunoccupied seats in some s
othe arena."
When asked whether theser
sats were purchased by
ftiority groups of .alumni, R+
isted that such is not the
he students currently at
toUniversity have prioritl
0culty or alumni.Ofcourse,i
ale extra tickets available, w
Qcommodate the demands
#fculty and former ticket ho
#id Renfrew.
-- A SECOND FACTOR contri
tD the decline in attendance

up at Crisler
fact that several students, speculat-
packed ing that tickets would be scarce in
ichigan 1977-78, purchased a large number of
." en- tickets before the season. Now, two
wdy on months and four losses later, they
ichigan realize that the demand and interest
is not as great as anticipated.
"Naturally," said Renfrew, "your
sler on attendance reflects your perform-
ed that ance on the court, your won-lost rec-
hardly ord. Interest fluctuates from high to
e total low, depending upon the success of
ousand the team. (Michigan's upset loss to
Illinois put the Wolverines at 8-4, and
loyal dumped them out of first place in the
ticket Big Ten.)
cited "Also, the conference schedule has
ice ap- just started. I'm sure that few seats
son. will be empty at the Michigan State
pw, "a and Purdue games," Renfrew added.
f fans
acourse ACTUALLY, ALL Michigan bas-
in their 'ketball games are virtual sellouts.
ds rows All but about 150 tickets are sold
ections prior to game time, and' the an-
nounced paid attendance figure is
rows of almost always over 13,000.
special Announcing the paid attendance
enfrew instead of the actual count is an
e. case. accepted practice in college basket-
tending ball. In, contrast, at football games,
iy, not ticket takers count all persons who
if there enter the stadium, including the
e.try to band, coaches, players, and media.
of our Renfrew indicated that it is diffi-
)lders," cult to pinpoint one specific reason
why no-shows are more prominent
ibuting than in the past.
is the

Daily Photo by JOHN KNOX
A SLIGHTLY LESS than packed Crisler Arena and a regionally televised
audience looks on as Minnesota's Kevin McHale stretches for a rebound despite
the nudging efforts of Michigan's Alan Hardy during the Wolverines' 69-65 victory
over the Gophers.

Down to
the wire
By DonMacLachan
College wrestling
S. a le of sacrifice
HE SPORT OF WRESTLING goes relatively unnotided here at Michi-
gan. The grapplers usually take to the mats in front of two hundred
spectators.
A large portion of the fans are relatives of the wrestlers. The rest of the
crowd consists of friends of the grapplers - fair weather fans that aren't
seen again after watching one match.
I remember one time two years ago in Crisler Arena when I yelled a few
expletives at a wrestler, intended only for the ears of my peers. Instead my
verbal statement was heard throughout the arena.
However, the most important part of wrestling is the grapplers them-
selves. Wrestlers are not ordinary athletes. They are not Dick the Bruisers
that wrestle for laughs. Instead, they are a close knit group of athletes that
go through one heckuva season. To put it simply wrestling is a very
challenging sport that requires plenty of discipline, patience and talent.
The season begins for the grapplers in September. Conditioning gets un
derway and most practices consist of running up and down the stadium steps
and getting into shape. Finally in October, the team wrestles among them-
selves to determine who deserves the ten starting spots.
Several "challenge matches" must be won from teammates before a
wrestler earns his spot on the squad. Then the season comes - and it cer-
tainly is a long one. After getting in shape and lifting weights to improve
their strength, most wrestlers are forced to cut weight in order to wrestle at
a certain weight class.
In the early part of the season wrestlers are permitted an allowance
of two or three pounds- they can weigh in for a match a few pounds heavier
than normally required. As the'season progresses,the restrictions become
tighter and if a grappler doesn't make weight for a match, he doesn't wrestle
- it's as simple as that.
In December, the wrestlers hardly get a holiday vacation. They battle
through finals like the rest of us, but then depart for the Midlands tourna-
ment in Evanston, Illinois. Other athletes such as the football team spend the
holidays away from home - but the Midlands Tournament is no Rose Bowl.
Probably the single most demanding facet of wrestling is cutting weight
for a match - and remaining in good enough shape to win the battle on the
mat. Around Christmas a wrestler can't fill his belly with turkey and
dressing - he must watch what he eats. Every extra pound he puts on while
eating a meal must come off before he can wrestle again.
While cutting the weight during the week of a match, a grappler might
have a Coke for dinner or smear some honey on his gums and have it suffice.
He can eat some food but if he does, extra work will be involved ... running
laps in a rubber suit around the terrace in Criser or else sitting in the light
box in the wrestling room.
In the light box,-a wrestler sits while light bulbs shine around him,
causing him to' sweat and lose a few pounds. Just like sitting in the small
light box by himself, a wrestler is by himself on the mat. There'are no team
mates to rely on to pick up the slack. It's the lTichigan wrestler against an
opponent and a lot of personal pride is on the line.
While cutting weight, the wrestler could sap a lot of his strength -
especially if he takes off the pounds too fast. SOmetimes a grappler must run
and keep his weight down right until the moment he weighs in. Once he
makes weight the wrestler can eat a pre-match meal but usually his stomach
has shrunk in size and he just can't eat very much.
Wrestling on the road is an even tougher chore. The wrestling team does
not fly to any regular season matches - rather they hop in a van and drive to
such sites as Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and Iowa. While riding across
country the wrestlers can look at the landscape and hope for time to go by
quickly.
A most demanding trip will arise for the Michigan grapplers in the
beginning of February when they face a three-day road swing. On Thursday
they wrestle against national power Iowa State and during the next two days
travel to battle Big Ten powers Iowa and Minnesota.
After a win there won't be much time to celebrate. Maybe the wrestler
can eat a light meal, but he can't wrestle the next day if he doesn't take it
back off.
Just think how frustrating it must be jto finally get down to weight and
then lose the match. A wrestler must wonder if it is worth all the mental and
physical anguish. It's no wonder very few wrestlers.actually make it through
gfour years of competition.
Michigan 's 12-game basketball statistics'

POR TS OF THE DAIL Y:

Blaz ers,
By The Associated Press
.,NEW YORK - Bill Walton and
aurice Lucas, the power duo of
ortland's defending champions,
were named to the West team, while

Rudranands Ashram
Is now offering
Beginning courses in
Meditation & Kundalini Yoga
BEGINNING CLASSES every Monday,
Tuesday, and Wednesday at 5:30
FULL CLASS at 6:30
995-5483

rVIgti
dazzling Julius Erving of the East
was the leading vote-getter for the
National Basketball Association All-
Star Game in balloting announced
yesterday.
Lucas, the Trail Blazers' devastat-
ing forward, and Walton, Portland's
smooth center, will head the West's
starting lineup that also will include
veteran forward Rick Barry of the
Golden State Warriors and guards!
David Thompson of the Denver
Nuggets and Paul Westphal of the
Phoenix Suns.
Erving, winner of the Most Valu-
able Player award in last season's

game, won by the West 125-124, will
lead the East's starting five, which
also will have)Larry Kenon of the Sash
Antonio Spurs at forward, Dave
Cowens of the Boston Celtics at
center, and Peter Maravich of the
New Orleans Jazz and George Gervin
of San Antonio at guards.
* * *
Injured champ
DALLAS - Dallas Cowboys quar-
terback Roger Staubach will undergo
surgery for a broken bone in his right
index finger Wednesday, an injury he
suffered in Super Bowl XII.4
He broke a bone and severed the
tendon in the finger in the fourth
quarter of Dallas' 27-10 victory over
the Denver Broncos in New Orleans
last Sunday.
Wide receiver Butch Johnson, who
made a spectacular touchdown catch in
the game, also will be operated on
Wednesday for a broken bone behind
his right thumb.
s hAnd defensive back Randy Hughes,
twho recovered two fumbles and inter-
cepted a, pass in the Super Bowl, will

undergo surgery Friday or Saturday to
repair a nerve in the little toe on his
right foot.
Meanwhile, Cowboys center John
Fitzgerald will have damaged cartilage
removed from his right knee either
Friday or Saturday.
Other Cowboys scheduled for surgery
in early February include cornerback
Benny Barnesfor a bone spur in his
right foot and ankle, defensive lineman
Bill Gregory for damaged cartilage in
his right knee and retiring offensive
tackle Ralph Neely for a bone spur in
his right knee.
Cowboy officials also said Tony DOr-
sett's right knee hasbeen put in splints
and that a decision will be made on his
status later in the week. Dorsett also
was injured in the second half of the
game.
A Cowboys spokesman said there was
no cause for concern about the surgery
since all injured players are expected
to be completely recovered by next
season.
In Tampa, it was announced that Jim
Hart of the St. Louis Cardinals would
replace Staubach on the National Foot-
ball Conference all-star squad.

op All-Star ballot

I t at
location
change
Tired of Michigan's long winters? Relocate
to California or Florida with the U.S. Navy
Nurse Corps. Senior B.S.N. Students are
eligible to apply.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL COLLECT
(313) 226-7795/7845

1 ,
Sign up now at Union Lanes
* U
55C per game .
Mon., Wed., Thurs. evenings
OPEN: 10 am MON.-FRI. U
1 pm SAT. & SUN.
mm mm m m mii r## mmm### m m" im####"##i"#mii#mmmmm ##m

Player

G-S FG/FGA

Pct. FT/FTA'

FIRST DOWN Is Having A
MID-WINTER
SNOW SPECIAL SALE
COLORADO COMFORT SKI JACKETS
solids & multicolors
downfilIled-taffeta shells

Thompson............12-12
McGee-...............12-12
Baxter ..............: 12-12
Hardy ....'............ 12-12
Staton...............12-12
Johnson ............... 12-0
Heuerman.............11-0
Bodnar, Mt.........7-0
Robinson ............... 6-0
Bergen ................. 8-0
Bodnar,. Mk............7-0
Lozier............... 10-0
Team & others...........

92-159
84-169
80-160
63-132
48-96
26-49
7-12
4-8
3-7
4-16
3-4
2-9

.579
.497
.500
.477
.500
.581
.583
.500
.429
.250
.750
.222

20-31
36-44
19-27
11-20
13-24
9-15
5-10
3-B
2-5
1-3
0-0
1-3

Pct.
.645
.818
.704
.555
.541.
.600
.500
.500
.400
.433
---3

Rbs Avg
116 9.7
57 4.8
39 3.3
79 6.6
50 4.2
11 1.0
24 2.4
2 0.3
6 1.0
18 1.5
4 0.7
1 , 0.1
70'- 5.8

204
204
179
137
109
61
19
11
8
9
6
5

17.0
17.0
14.9
11.4'
9.1
5.5
1.7
1.6
1.3
1.1
1.0
0.5

29
27
28
24
20
18
4
3
8
4
4

Pts Avg Hi

stand-up collars-powder cuffs
reg. 160 NOW $4995
GETA GRIP ONWINTER
Kombi ski mitts & gloves
aflleather outers
downfilled
reg. to 39 NOW 29
WINTER WONDERWEAR
Thermal tops & bottoms
50-50 polyester & cotton
reinforced seams-full cut
SAVE $3 per set
GRENOBLE TURTLENECKS
dacron & cotton
6 popular colors

INVENTORY REDUCTION SALEII
We are making room for our NEW SPRING INVENTORY I
Good size and color selection from our rental inventory
for groups or individuals
CAMPUS
TUX SHOP
SALE STARTS THURSDAY, JANUARY 19, 10 a.m.
ALL SALES FINAL NO ALTERATIONS
SELECT GROUP WHITE BLACK COATS BURGUNDY
DINNER JACKETS DINNER JACKET After Six TUXEDOS.
yellow, green, white After Six, Windsor model Windsor model TXEDOS.
gray, blacko
$200 $2000 $3500
$ 15matching pant available matching pant available
AFTER SIX IVORY TAILSNavy and Brown
NEWPORT MODEL DINNER JACKET COAT ONLY Navy
rswhite, mint, (vary, TUXEDOS
It. blue, white, yellow fard West it. blue coat and pant
$3500 $3500 $35000 $0
_____ -. ....t...i matching pant available n . . .,..,.n*

Team

1. Kentucky (40) ................ ... 12-0
2. Marquette....................... 12-1,
3. UCLA ........................13-1
4. North Carolina.............. 13-2
5. Indiana St. (1) ................... 12-0,
6. Arkansas.......................14-1
7. Louisville....................... 10-2
8. Kaqsas........... ............13-2
9. Michigan State................. 12-1
(tie) DAILY LIBELS..............13-1
10. Notre Dame................. 8-3
11. Syracuse........................ 12-2
12. San Francisco ................... 12-4
13. New Mexico (1).................11-2
14. virginia.......................10-1
15. Georgetown.....................12-2
16. Holy Cross................. 11-1'
17. Texas.........................12-2
18. Duke . ............... 12-3
19. Providence...................... 13-1
20. DePaul ........ .........13-1
Hockey Poll
Team ecord"
1. Boston Univ....................13-0
(tie) Denver-. ... .. 17-4
(tie) Wisconsin ................. 16-6-1
4. Michigan Tech.................15-7
5. Minnesota....................15-6-1
6. Bowling Green.................16-5
7. Clarkson ........................12-6
8. Boston College.................12-3
9. Cornell.......................7-4-1
10. Brown........ ................8-7
(tie) MICHIGAN ....12-10

418
j336
302
224
200h
140
93
89
'89
66
'40
35
34
24
23
22
19
18
13
11

UPI Poll

Record Points

(

Points
89
89
89
68
53
50
35
32
12
6

reg. s9

NOW $595

HORSE SENSE
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) -
Jockey Dave Whited is a student of
horses in addition to riding them. He'
says certain horses are much better
n:A. . *n.. ...thn. 4'lt n .a

Buy a Wool Interknit Ski Sweater at Regular
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