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January 18, 1978 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1978-01-18

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I

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 18, 1978-Page 7.

New comp. program

stirs reacti
(Continued from Page 1)
ment's undergraduate adviser.
Coffin said he was not enthusiastic
about writing being taught in the
physics department: "This is a function
that had been taken care of by one
department. Our professors are not
well qualified to teach English," he
said.
Still, to comply with the requirement,
Coffin see two possibilities. A labora-
tory course may be designated for
writing, or a reading course that would
require composition might be added.
Other reaction was also mixed.
Mathematics department Chairman
Frederick Gehring said he supported'
the philosophy of the plan, but "can't
see it in this department.
"Somehow we'll cope with it," he
said.
Planning has been under way for
almost a year in the psychology depart-
ment to bring about courses dealing
with "writing in psychology,'"accord-
-ing to Department Chairman Warren
Norman.
Several students expressed their
overall approval of the idea, but were
apprehensive about non-English profes-
sors teaching writing.
"I think it's a pretty good idea.
People should be able to write," said
LSA sophomore Dan Schwimmer.
Freshperson Margy Smith said, "It's
sad that people get out of school without

on in LSA
being.able to write." But she said she
felt the new program falls short. "You
should have English teachers teaching
English she said."
Sophomore Dave Johnson agreed. "I
don't think (most professors) are quali-
fied. It should be done through the Eng-
lish department," he said.
. Sandy Feldman, coordinator of the
Students',Counseling office, said, "I'm
glad they're putting an emphasis on
English." LSA Student Government
(LSA-SG) President Dick Brazee
mirrored that view: "I applaud the
positive spirit in which it was adopted."
LSA-SG member Jim Sullivan said he
felt the English Composition Board
(ECB) "put a tremendous amount of ef-
fort" into their proposal.
Last year a similar proposal was
made which was hotly debated by the
faculty before being defeated by only a
handful of votes. Psychology depart-
ment chairman Norman called this
year's "a much better plan."
The proposal brought before the
faculty last March did not include an
entrance test, as does the plan passed
Monday. Also, last year the ECB was
suggesting very specific requirements
of the various departments. The new
plan leaves the required writing pro-
gram open for discussion in the individ-
ual departments.

Stanford newspaper
fights police search

AP Photo'
This is how it looked when the movers and shakers sat down yesterday to talk as The Egyptian delegation is in the foreground left; Israel's'Foreign Minister
the Middle East peace negotiations reconvened in Jerusalem's Hilton Hotel. Moshe Dayan, with eyepatch, sits at the far side of the table.

MIDEAST TALKS REOPEN:

WASHINGTON (AP) -The Stan-
ford Daily, an independent news-
paper at the California campus, told
the Supreme Court yesterday that
the First Amendment barred broad
searches of its news files, even under
warrant, by police looking for evi-
dence in criminal cases.
But that contention was challenged
by California law enforcement agen-
cies who claimed that such a legal
barrier could lead to the destruction
of evidence by news organizations if,
for whatever reason, they chose not
to cooperate in investigations of
events they have covered.
THE CASE stems from a 1971 dem-
onstration at the Stanford University
Hospital. The incident produced
some violence, including injuries to
police from missiles thrown by dem-
onstrators.
Police in Palo Alto, Calif., obtained
a search warrant and went through
the newspaper's offices in an effort to
identify perpetrators of the violence.
The took nothing after a complete
search of the offices, including desk
tops.
The newspaper protested that the
police had no right to go through its
files, and two lower courts agreed
that the specific evidence should
have been sought via subpoena -
thus giving the paper the right to
argue in court whether the material
would be turned over. The U.S. dis-
trict and appeals courts also award-
ed ~$47,500 in attorney's fees to the
paper.
W. ERIC COLLINS, deputy attor-
ney general of California, told the
Supreme Court that the Stanford
Daily had a history of being uncoop-
erative with police and that, in part,

was why the search warrant, rather
than a subpoena, was used.
Collins said the paper has a policy
"to destroy all potentially incrimin-
ating unpublishedphotographic ma-
terial," and in such a circumstance
the police are justified in expediting
a search.
But Jerome Falk, speaking for the
paper and a-host of broadcast and
.print trade organizations, said "the
inference that the Stanford Daily
would have destroyed evidence is an
unfortunate slur that has no support
whatsoever in the record."

'Equal
(Continued from Page 1)
and Egyptian position papers showe
sharp disputes. He said these mal
differences required study to defin
what "is identical, and what is not t
far apart, where we can relativel
easily reach agreement."
THE EX-GENERAL pointed toa
least one narrowing of gaps, sayin

house'fo
there had been "change, and even a t
ad major one" in Egypt's position on the I
in agenda for talks. He did not elabor-
ie ate but appeared to refer to the
)o U.S.-engineered compromise that
ly glossed over. such thorny issues ast
the Palestinians in the formal
agenda. P
at A U.S. spokesman said the twor
ng sides had shown a willingness to get

r

Palestinians?

down to substantive issues. It is
Vance's view that the negotiations
will be long and difficult, possibly
with occasional suspensions.
Vance, who will only remain at the
talks until Friday, hailed the "cour-
age and wisdom" of Egyptian Presi-
dent Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime
Minister Menahem Begin "in sweep-
ing aside the barriers that for so long
separated Arabs from Israelis."
ISRAELI OFFICIALS expressed
surprise at Kamel's tough speech but
said he might adopt a more concilia-
tory stance behind closed doors.
"Any attempt to solve our prob-

lems and differences by ultimatums
would miss the whole point," Dayan
said in his speech.
He appeared also to caution Egypt
that it could no more achieve undue
concessions at the peace table thanl
on the battlefield.
"A PEACE settlement," he said,
"is the alternative to war and not a
substitute for war."
Kamel said Egypt was ready to
accept Israel as part of the Middle
East. But he said all the land -
including Arab East Jerusalem -
captured by Israel during the 1967
Six-Day war must be restored to the
Arabs.

Saudis want West Bank, Gaza

(Continued from Page 1)
THE PUBLICATION said the Saudis
rejected Israeli IPrime Minister Mena-
hem Begin's offer of limited autonomy
for the 1.1 million Palestinians living on
the West Bank and the Gaza Strip,
regions occupied by Israeli since June
1967.
It also said the Saudis feel Pales-
tinian nationhood should be gained in
stages "but not in a generation."
Thereport said Saudi Foreign Minis-
ter Prince Saud al-Faisal used "harsh
words" to describe Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat during a meeting with
John West, America's ambassador to
Saudi Arabia.
IT SAID SAUDI leaders resented at-
tempts by Carter to get them to express
for Sadat's peace initiatives.
Fahd was quoted as saying he was
glad Sadat "did not consult us" before
his historic journey to Jerusalem last
November.
"If he did, we would have advised
him against it and our relations with
Egypt would have been disrupted,"
Fahd reportedly said. "Saudi op-

position would have jeopardized his
regime and reinforced the position of
the Egyptian left."
JN THEIR MEETING with Carter,
the Saudis were "more openly adamant
on two main conditions to help meet the
free world's increasing demand for oil
in the coming years," the publication,
said.
One of those conditions is complete
Israeli withdrawal from all Arab lands
occupied since 1967, the report said.
The other is recognizing the right of
Palestinians to be repatriated in the
West Bank.

Saudi leaders reportedly were
unhappy about Carter's views on
Sadat's peace initiatives and the
Palestine Liberation Organization
(PLO). Carter has repeatedly praised
the Egyptian leader and criticized the
PLO for its refusal to take part in peace
efforts.
PLO spokesmen in Beirut had no
comment on the reported willingness of
Saudi leaders to buy occupied Arab
lands, but one said the organization was
aware of a sharp strain in Saudi-Ameri-
can relations. Saudi Arabia is a major
bankFoller of the PLO.

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j

BE
UNIQUE 'GO
Sorority Rush Mass Meeting
January 18 7:30 pm
3rd floor Michigan League
Register for Rush
Call: 663-4505
Wiest Bank
FRIENDS 'n' LOVERS
4k- uL... AICT RANKJIRESTAU RANT presents a new at-

1978
HOPWOOD
Underc ssme
ACADEMY OF AMERICAN POETS,
BAIN-SWIGGETT,& GUTTERMAN
POETRY AWARDS
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY18,4 p.m.
RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE

4-TIME HOPWOOD WINNER
Authorof
Poetry:BREAKING CAMP
HARD LOVING,
A WORK OF ARTIFICE,
WHEN THE DROUGHT BROKE,
TO BE OF USE,
LIVING IN THE OPEN
Novels: GOING DOWN FAST,
DANCE THE EAGLE TO SLEEP
SMALL CHANGES,
WOMAN ON THE EDGE
OF TIME

y

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