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September 09, 1972 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1972-09-09

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IHL M~HI(,AN L)AILY Page Seven

Saturday, September 9, 1972

1HE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

..

Tragedy

hits

oly as

Boston,
11- 1f ti it

j

riant off
Be nga ls

Yanks;

down

o'5

By The Associated Press
Munich-Jim Ryun fell, little
Rick DeMont finally lost his medal d aily
and banishment came for two 400-
meter track medalists charged
with "disgusting" behavior in a
succession of tragedies for the -
Americans yesterday the Olym-NIGHT EDITOR:
pic Games (more on Ryun below).BNBHMcIOR
It was the United States' day of BOB McGINN
infamy, a "Black Friday," prob-
ably to be remembered for many burned up, it would go home in a
years., minute," said George Frenn, the:l
245-pound hammer thrower from
THE AMERICANS' Hollywood, Calif. Frenn is white.
ing day of this terror-marred, dis- RICK DeMONT HAD a lost look
sension-riddled sports' spectacle, in his young eyes yesterday as he
began with the International Olym- said, "I feel I got burned."
pic Committee announcement But the 16-year-old swimmer
about DeMont, a 16-year-old school- from nearby San Rafael managed
boy from San Rafael, Calif., a few smiles during a news con-
troubled with asthma, who had a ference where he discussed the
forbidden drug in his system when Olympic gold medal he won and
he swam to victory in the 400- apparently will have to give back.
meter freestyle. "I've still got it with me-not
After a review of the case, the here, but at home," he said and
IOC executive Board decided that added, "I'll give it back if the
the gold medal should go to Brad International Olympic Committee
Cooper of Australia, who finished' or my coach (U.S. team coach
second and the silver should go to Peter Deland) tell me to."
Steve Genter of Lakewood, Calif., A refusal, he said, "would prob-
who was third. Rick and his medal ably mean I'd get kicked out of
already had flown home. I tha AAU (Amateur Athletic Union)
Then, moments late, the Execu- and couldn't compete anymore."
tive Board rocked the Olympics DeMont won the.400-meter free-
with the announcement that Vince style at the M~unich Olympic
Matthews of Brooklyn, N.Y., and Games. But the IOC has stripped
Wayne Collett of Santa Monica, him of the title because traces of
Calif., were barred from any future a forbidden drug were detected in
Olympic competition because of his system after the race.
their disrespectful attitude on the
victory stand Thursday after they THE DRUG, ephedrine, was in
had finished 1-2 in the 400-meter medicine DeMont had been taking
race. about a year for asthma. Ephe-

man into the Olympic boxing
finals.
RAY SEALES of Tacoma, Wash.,
a light welterweight, defeated
Zvonimir Vujin of Yugoslavia on
a unanimous decision, but Valdez(
a 25-year-old Air Force sergeant
from Houston, lost to Emilio Cor-
rea of Cuba 3-2.
In other semifinals, bantam-
weight Ricardo Carreras of New
York City, was eliminated by Al-
fonso Zamora of Mexico on a 4-1
decision and Marvin Johnson, a
middleweight from Indianapolis,
was stopped in the second by Viat-
chesiav Lemechev of Russia.
All the American losers will get

bronze medals. The U.S. perform- ft1t(t, / i,
ance compared with the two gold'
medals and one silver medal win-
ner in Mexico City in 1968 when By The Associated Pressj
seven Americans reached the BOSTON - C a r 1 Yastrzemskis
semifinals. drove in three runs with a single
A bright note came when Harry and a two-run homer and Luis
"Buddy" Melges, a 42-year-old Tiant hurled a four-hitter, lead-f
sailm aker from Szenda, Wisc., won ing the first-place Boston Red Soxl
the gold medal of the new soling to a 4-2 victory over the New YorkI
Olympic yachting class yesterday. Yankees last night.j
Melges won the final race sail- It was the fourth consecutive
ing with crew members Bill Bent- triumph and 12th in 14 games forj
sen of Lake Geneva, Wisc., and the Red Sox, who started play one-
Bill Allen of Excelsior, Minn. He half game ahead of Detroit in the
had been certain of the medal al- American League East. The fourth-
ready when it was known that the place Yankees have dropped three
two big classes could sail six races in a row and five of seven and are
only instead of seven. three games back.s
Yastrzemski gave Boston a 1-0
lead off Fritz Peterson with a
first-inning single following Luis
Aparicio's double off loser Peter-
son. He made it 3-0 in the third1
.;with his sixth home run of the
baseball season with Tommy Har-
per aboard via a walk.
Tiant, 11-4, went into the gameI
with four straight shutouts butI
had hisnscoreless stringsnapped
at 40 innings in the fifth when
Felipe Alou doubled and scored on
a single by Celerino Sanchez.
The Red Sox bounced right back
with a run in their half of the fifth
on Harper's double and a single
by Aparicio.
Bobby Murcer's career high 27th
j home run in the sixth accounted
for the only other New York run
off Tiant, who has pitched seven
consecutive complete game vic-
tories.
Fryman sizzles
BALTIMORE - Detroit's Woodie
Fryman held Baltimore hitless for
5/3 innings and finished with a
two-hit 2-1 victory over the Orioles
last night that kept the Tigers on
the heels of the Boston Red Sox
in baseball's American League
E ast.
The Tigers remained one-half
. game behind Boston while the
third-place Oriolestdropped 2/
games off the pace.
Gates Brown gave Fryman, 5-2,
the lead with his 10th home run in
the opening inning off loser Pat
Dobson, 15-15, and Ed Brinkman's
run-scoring double made it 2-0 in
the seventh.
The Orioles threatened in the
first and fourth, but didn't get a
hit until Brooks Robinson doubled
with one out in the sixth.
A pinch homer by Don Buford,
:. who was 0-for-14 as a pinch hitter,
AP Photo including 10 strikeouts, ended Fry-
man's shutout bid in the seventh.
consoles a distraught Jim Ryun Fryman, making his first start
rd:;y. against Baltimore since coming to

r

Detroit from the National League,
struck out eight.
A hit batsman and a walk pro-
duced a Baltimore threat in the:
first and the Orioles loaded the
bases on two walks and another
hit batsman in the fourth before
Mark Belanger flied out.
A walk and a single by Aurelio
Rodriguez preceded Brinkman's de-
cisive hit in the seventh.
* * *
Viva Jenkins
PHIfLADELPHIA - Ferguson.
Jenkins became a 20-game winner
for the sixth consecutive National
League baseball season last night
as the Chicago Cubs beat the Phil-
adelphia Phillies 4-3 on back-to-
back doubles by Don Kessinger and
Jose Cardenal in the eighth inning.
Willie Montanez' 13th home run
of the season helped the Phillies
to a 3-1 lead after four innings but
the Cubs caught up in the sixth
when Kessinger singled and Billy
Williams tagged Dave Downs for
his 29th homer. They were the

100th and 101st runs batted in for
Williams.
Jenkins, 20-10, has a 22-6 record
against the Phillies, who dealt him
to the Cubs in 1966. The 6-foot-5
right-hander allowed eight hits and
struck out seven.
Chicago got its first run in the
third on Carmen Fanzone's single,
a stolen base, fly ball and a wild
pitch. The Phillies broke a 1-1 tie
with two runs in the fourth on
singles by Larry Bowa, Tommy
Hutton and Montanez and Joe Lis'
groundout.
* * *
Pale Hose split
CHICAGO-Pitcher Clyde Wright
HOCKEY
Russia 5, Team Canada 3
% NFL
Buffalo 34, Philadelphia 17

smacked a three-run homer and
pitched the California Angels to a
9-4 victory over the Chicago White
Sox last night for a double-header
split.
Dick Allen drove in four runs
with a bases-loaded triple and a
double to pace the White Sox to a
5-1 victory in the opener.
The split, coupled with Oakland's
6-3 victory over Texas, dropped the
Sox 31/ games behind the leaders
in the American League West.
Wright, 15-9, capped a four-run
second inning with his second
homer of the year which followed
singles by Doug Howard, Lee
Stanton and Jack Hiatt and chased
loser Dave Lemonds.
The Angels pecked away for
four more runs and had an 8-0 lead
when Wright finally weakened in
the eighth. The Sox loaded the
bases on a single, a walk and an
error. Allen singled home two runs
and Rick Reichardt tripled home
two more.

The University of Michigan

i

GILBERT and SULLIVAN SOCIETY

Medal

Russia
United States
East Germany
Japan
West Germany
Australia
Italy
Great Britain,-

{

drine is in some hay fever pills
that can be bought without a doc-
tor's prescription.
Totals "I had it on my record, but
Gold Sil. Br. Tot. somewhere along the line someone
34 22 18 74 didn't read it," the teenager said.
27 27 24 78 But he added, "I'm in no position
19 17 20 56 to blame anyone."
12 7 8 27 In boxing, welterweight Jesse
8 9 11 28 Valdez, the United States' boxing
8 7 2 17 team's flashiest fighter, lost a dis-
5 3 6 14 puted split decision last night as
4 4 4 12 the Americans moved only one

announces its

FALL MASS MEETING

Sweden 4 4 4 12;
Poland 4 3 4 11
Hungary 3 8 12 23
Bulgaria 3 7 2 12
France 2 4- 5 11
THE U.S. OLYMPIC Committee,:
stunned and embarrassed by the'
IOC action, immediately sent off
a letter of protest and requested a,
review of the matter.
But the damage already had.
been done and the American sec4
tor of the Village hummed with1
charges of "racism" and threats of
an athletic boycott, mainly black,
that seemed unlikely to take place
on any large scale.
But American morale, already
shattered by internal bickering,
,buck-passing and administrative
foul-ups, dipped to a low as the
Soviet Union continued to surge
ahead in the gold medal race.
"The whole U.S. team is so

Billboard
The intramural sports man-
agers' will have several meet-
ings next week. It is important
to attend them. Residence Hall
meeting will be Tuesday, Sept.
12 at 7:30. p.m. in the Sports
Service Building; Graduate meet-
ing Sept. 12 at 9 p.m. in the
Sports Service Building.
Women's division meeting will
be on Sept. 12 at 7:30 p.m. in
the Barbour Gym while the In-
dependent division meeting will
be on Sept. 13 at 7:30 p.m. in the
Sports Service Building.
The Fraternity division meet-
ing will be on Sept. 13 at 7:30
p.m. In the Sports Service Build-
ing. The Women's Club Sports
meeting will be on Sept. 13 at
7:30 p.m. at Barbour Gym.

for

KENYA'S KIPCHOGE KETNO
after their 1,500 meterhe t yestei

LAST H URRAH
Ryun falis* out n bid for gold

'i
,,I
i
I'
I :

THE GONDOLIERS
Sunday, September 10
8:00 p.m:-Michigan Union
University Club Lounge
Singers, Actors, Technical, Costumes, etc.

Professional League Standings

East

Boston
Detroit
Baltimore
New York
Cleveland
Milwaukee

71
72
70
70
61
54

L
59
61
63
64
n
79

Pet.
.546
.541
.526
.522
.406

GB
21 2
3
11
181/

National League
East

West
Oakland 78 54 .591 -
Chicago 75 58 .564 31A_
Minnesota 66 65 .504 I114
Kansas City 56 06 .496 12
Calif ornia 62 71 .466 16!/
Texas 50 83 .376 2812
Last Night's Results
Boston 4, New York 2
Kansas City 5, Minnesota 0, 1st
Kansas City 3, Minnesota 2, 2nd
Chicago 5, California 1, 1st
California 9, Chicago 4, 2nd
Detroit 2, Baltimore 1
Milwaukee at Cleveland, postponed
Oakland 6, Texas 3
Today's Games
Boston (McGlothen 6-5) at Cleveland
(Perry 19-15)
Milwaukee (Lonborg 12-9 and Brett
5-10) at Baltimore (McNally 13-
14 and Alexander 5-8), 2
Minnesota (Goltz 3-1) at Kansas City'
(Nelson 9-4)
Oakland (Odom 13-4) at Texas (Stan-
house 2-5)
California (Foster 0-1) at Chicago
(Fisher 4-6)
New York (Gardner 6-2) at Detroit
(Coleman 15-12)

Pittsburgh
Chicago
New York
St. Louis
Montreal
Philadelphia
Cincinnati
Houston
Los Angeles
Atlanta
San Francisco
San Diego

w
85
73
67
64
61
49
82
74
71
62
58
50

L
47
61
64
76
71
84
51
58
61
72
75
82

Pct.
.638
.541
.512
.477
.469
.370
.617
.561
.538
.463
.436
.379

GB
121/4
16j
21
22
35
71?
101/
201>
24
31 %z

MUNICH u h.-,-Jim 1yn's third bid for a tolJd
modal eid d with a fli , yesterday-,,hen the
1,500-meter world record h.oldcr from Kansas
tripped andfelduring a qualifyig he at
"I cap 't figre o ut what happened,' said the
stt irie , uom-f'ed Ryuo. "1 th'>ught I was play-
iPg it smart by laying back hike that."
The collision, with Ghana's little-known Billy
Fordjo 'r, left the 25-year-ol Ryun dazed. le
finis'ed th heat but was next-to-last and is out
of the Games.
The veteran, in his third Olympics, was ex-
pected to qualify for the semifinals of the 1,500
easily. lnstead, with one lap to go, his foot got
entangled with Fordjour's and both went sprawl-
ing.
"I don't rem ember exactly what hoppened,"
Ry in said later "I remember being in a collision

West

a d someone's knee hitting my jaw as I fell.
Wh n I got up, I realized I mustn't panic.
"I tried to distribute my pace evenly but, with
20 meters to go, I knew I wouldn't qualify."
R vun had run 3:52.8 for the mile this year,
t i'd fastest time ever recorded, and was favored
al '~g with Kenya's Kip Keino, to take the 1,500.
Ryun wot the silver medal in the 1968
Olympics when Keino won and set an Olympic
record of 3:34.9. The race was at high-altitude
Mlexico City, however, and Keino lives at 7,000-
foot Nairobi. Many felt their race here would
gi -e Ryvun a chance for revenge.
dvon finished in 3:51.2, his eyes filled with
tars. He was spiked on both ankles.
It was another hearbreak for the Kansan, who
as a teenager at Tokyo in 1964 was striken with
ft and failed to qualify, and who in 1968, as the
favorite, ran second to Keino.
wa
, t..E.

' - -- _ - _ _

;
i l'

IF

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Convenient Components

I

Last Night's Results
Pittsburgh 7-4 at Montreal, 1-2
St. Louis 9-2 at New York, 4-8
Chicago 4, Philadelphia 3
Houston at San Francisco, night
Atlanta at Los Angeles, night
Today's Games
St. Louis (Gibson 15-9) at New York
(Gentry'6-8)
Pittsburgh (Blass 16-6) at Montreal
Stoneman (10-11)
Houston (Reuss 9-11) at Los Angeles
Osteen (5-10)
Cincinnati (Gullett 8-7) at San Fran-
cisco (Willoughby 4-2)
Chicago (Hands 10-8) at Philadelphia
(Twitchell 3-8)
Only games scheduled

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