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December 13, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-13

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN! DAILY

Wednesday, December 1'3, 1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, December 13, 1972

Moonmen

take second

walk

SPACE CENTER, Houston (P)-
Apollo's 11's explorers, who have
picked up some of the youngest
rocks on the moon, stepped to
the surface for the second time
yesterday and prepared to drive
to an ancient avalanche in search
of the oldest lunar material.
The first 'task for Eugene Cer-
nan and Harrison Schmitt was to
form a makeshift fender f o r
their lunar taxi so they wouldn't
be . covered with the black dust
of the Taurus-Littrow valley.
Cernan exerted most of his
energy drilling holes for inser-
tion of heat probes - thermom-
eters - 8 and 10 feet deep.
The heat probe is designed to
measure temperatures miles in-
side the moon.
Scientists were particularly in.
terested in having this experi-
ment succeed since it was t h e
third attempt at installing the
probes on the moon.
One was put in place during
the Apollo 15 mission, but did not
reach far enough below the sur-
face.
Because Cernan and Schmitt
had to cut short their first, walk,
one of the three explosive pack-
ages which they were to have in-
stalled was not put in place, but
the task will be done later.
Tremors resulting from t h e
blasts react in the interior of
the moon somewhat the way
earthquakes react. From these
tremors scientists can detect
what lies below the moon's sur-
face.
Bone-tired from their f i r s t
seven-hour lunar excursion fol-
lowing a perfect landing on Mon-
day, astronauts Cernan a n d

Schmitt were given an extra hour
sleep yesterday, delaying t h e
start of their second m o o n
walk yesterday evening.
Their driving target yesterday
was a 6.000-foot-high mountain
which they call the South Massif
4.4 miles from the landing craft.
The goal on this last Apollo mis-
sion is to fill in misisng chapters
in lunar history, basically t h e
very early and the very late.
Rocks returned by five earlier
Apollo moon landers have rang-
FDA ORDER:
Pregnat

ed in age between 3 billion and
4.2 billion years.
While Cernan and Schmitt slept
yesterday, the almost-forgotten
man of Apollo 17, Ronald Evani,
received a detailed report oa
their first excursion while he
orbited 60 miles above the moon
in command ship America.
Apollo scientists hypothes zed
the bright flashes reported from
orbit by Schmitt and Evans near
the western edge of the moon's
front side may be gas vented

from very old volcanoes.
Cernan and Schmitt's f i n a l
driving expedition today, sched-
uled to start at 4:33 p.m., wil
take them to another large moun-
tain named North Massif in
search of more ancient material.
After blasting off from t h e
moon tomorrow, they will rejoin
Evans in America for two more
days of lunar orbit science before
heading for home Saturday.
Splashdown in the Pacific is
scheduled next Tuesday.

tle" NN ARS4$ "R ~ P
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"Dy 13 1
SA~ PM e Wl#14
ALSf .1elf m~y

I

wcy test kits banned

I

WASHINGTON (R) - Pregnancy
test kits judged unreliable and
gonorrhea test kits lacking proof
of safety and effectiveness are be-
ing recalled nationwide, the Food
and Drug Administration announc-
ed yesterday.
The agency said any woman
who has recently used an Ova III
test kit should "see her physicianI
immediately for accurate methods
of detecting pregnancy."
The kits, sold without prescrip-
tion and advertised in newspapers
and women's magazines with the
slogan "When you want to be the
first to know" are considered inac-
curate, unreliable and prone to
give false results, the FDA said.
Hundreds of thousands of the
pregnancy test kits are believed
to have been distributed during the
last two years, an FDA spokesman
said, although the manufacturer
claims to have marketed only 165,-1
000.
The identical Ova II kits are
manufactured by La Mar and dis-
tributed through drug stores by
Faraday Laboratories of Hillside,
N.J.
The FDA said that at its request,
the U.S. attorney's office in New
Jersey seized more than 8,000 Ova
-

II kits last May. Faraday is con-i
testing the seizure.
Nevertheless, Faraday President
Arnold Suresky said the company
would voluntarily withdraw the kit
"until the questions raised by the
FDA are resolved."
"On the basis of the tests which
the company has conducted, Fara-
day Laboratories believes that Ova{
II is accurate and reliable whenI
used as directed," Suresky said.I
The kits attempt to determine
whether a woman is pregnant by
analyzing her urine but results
should not be relied upon, the FDA
said. The agency knows of no re-
liable nonprescription pregnancy
test kit, a spokesman added.
The other recall involves nearlyE
35,000 Gonodecten test kits for
gonorrhea, manufactured by the
Mediacl Products Division of U.S.'
Packaging Corp. at La Pore, In-
diana.

The FDA contends the nonpre-
scription kits are misbranded be-
cause t h e y 1 a c k documented
proof that they work.
The manufacturer agreed to halt
production last July but estimates
90 per cent of the kits still are on
the market, the FDA said.
Last August the FDA published
a proposal it hopes will lead to
uniform labeling and review of
the estimated 4,000 medical diag-
nostic kits being sold in the Unit-
ed States by some 400 firms.
Plans call for formation of an
advisory committee and class-by-
class review of the products, simi-
lar to that underway for the hun-
dreds of thousands of over-the-
counter drugs.
The main plants growing in Can-
ada's tundra are lichens, sedges,
mosses and low-lying shrubs.

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1
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DIAL 668-6416
at /
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PLUS
'A MOVIE THAT YOU
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-JUDITH CR/ST,
on NBC-TV TODAY show

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Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
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