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December 12, 1972 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-12

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Tuesday, December 12, 1972
1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Doge Seven

Tuesday, December 12, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page 5eveii

BROTHERS and SISTERS
Don't let a shaky math background keep you from
learning about computers. Next semester, try one
of these Computer & Communication Sci. courses.

I,
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SOC.
MATH
No math
Required
Calculus
Required

PSYCH
CH EM.

POL. SCI.
PRE-MED.

EDUC.
BIOLOGY

PHILO.
GRADS

CCS 20): Intro to CCS
CCS 274: Elementary Computer Methods
CCS 400: Foundations of CCS
CCS 273: Elementary Computer
Techniques
CCS 473: Intro, to Digital Computers
CALL 764-8504
The Black Computing Study Group

Have some lime on
aa
your hands?
Truck on down to the
f7fDaily and join the Busi-
ness Staff
at 420 Maynard
M-F 10-12, M-W-F 2-4, or Call 764-0560

Fish:
By LOIS EITZEN
Daily Science Writer
Billions of years ago, a pri-
mitive fish slithered onto dry
land. Why it did is of great in-
terest to biologists, because that
event opened the way for the
evolution of land vertebrates and
finally man.
An overflow crowd in Angell
Hall's Aud. B yesterday heard
Dr. Alfred Romer speculate why
the fish first came out of the
water. Romer, a Harvard pro-
fessor of Zoology, is one of the
world's most eminent paleontolo-
gists.
A jovial and enthusiastic speak-
er, Romer described his search
for fossils of the first land ani-
mal. Its characteristics, he said,
would have to include strong,
limb-like fins, primitive lungs,
and, to be the ancestor of mo-
dern amphibians, a jaw with
tooth-like bones.
Romer rejected theories that
fish first came on land in search
of atmospheric oxygen or food.
They were best equipped to ab-
sorb oxygen from water, he point-

ed out, and since they were
flesh-eating fish, there was no
food for them on land.
"They could look at the scen-
ery, but that's about all," he
added.
He also showed the audience a
cartoon of a primitive fish slid-
ing out of the sea. The caption
read, "This is where the action
is going to be, baby."
Romer's own theory agrees
with Darwin's theory of natural
selection. He cited geological evi-
dence that during the era of
transition from water to land,
there were seasonal droughts.
During these drought periods,
fish who could breathe atmos-
pheric oxygen would have been
favored.
He called the development of
amniotic eggs, which can be laid
on land, a "great step forward"
in vertebrate evolution. The fact
that reptiles lay their eggs on
dry land distinguishes them from
the more primitive amphibians.
Romer added that amniotic eggs
would also have been an import-
ant adaptation to seasonal
drought.

"What would a fish do if his
pond completely dried up?" Rom-
er asked. "He would be quite
literally stuck in the mud."
A fish with primitive 1 e g s
would be able to move to a new
pond, he said. Therefore Romer

described legs as originally an
adatation allowing a fish to re-
turn to water.
Romer is due to speak on cam-
pus this evening about primate
evolution and tomorrow about the
origin of mammals.

The first flop

landward

County posts argued

(Continued from Page 1)
According to Harrison, the au-
ditors are supposed to perform a
"checking" function. "They aren't
supposed to actually carry out the
activities they're auditing," he
says.
Through the new executive as-
sistant the auditors are made di-
rectly responsible for the function-
ing of most of county government.
And under the new plan, says Har-
rison, the only way the commis-
sioners will be able to communi-
cate with that bureaucracy is
through the auditors.
Harrison not only thinks that
this will create a "bureaucratic
bottleneck," but that under the
new plan the commissioners may
no longer be "in control of their
own destiny."
Lands, however, thinks that it is
necessary to pull together the
much - criticized county govern-
ment "under a clear line of au-

prove "completely responsive" to
the wishes of the commissioners.
He sees evidence of "political
paranoia" inethe criticisms which
have been raised against the plan
and thinks the Democrats are con-
fusing "affiliation with responsi-
bility."
Frank Griffin, the Democrat on
the Board of Auditors, claims that
his job is "business, not politics."
Asked if he would ever consider
hindering a decision made by the
commissioners, he replies: "I
would rather resign than be *a
party to any such thing."
It has been widely speculated
that Ross Childs, the current coun-
ty administrator, will be reap-
pointed astthe new executive as-
sistant to the auditors.
Childs has been attacked for al-
leged incompetence by Democrats,
but Lands thinks he has been cri-
ticized "for other people's faults."
The reorganization plan stipu-
lates exactly the same salary for

You'll Marvel at How Easily This
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Activities ?
"But l want friends,
diversity, action and
something to keep my
interest, too!

~Ji~ 1Mr4igjau Dailyj
BUSINESS STAFF
IS LOOKING FOR YOU!
Come see FRAN M-F, 10-2 and
M-W-F 2-4 at 420 MAYNARD
Staff members needed in advertising, cir-
culation, classified, and finance.

thority." He not only thinks that thenew post s thaout $28,000
the new plan "properly delegates" a year. The executive who reports
authority, but also that it will to the Board of Commissioners
would earn about $17,000 a year.
Commissioner Richard Walter-
house (R-Ann Arbor) "expects"
that Childs will be appointed to
the new position. That decision is
up to the Board of Auditors, who
not only decide who to hire for the
post but also when the new plan
is to go into effect.
Walterhouse points out, however,
that the new Board of Commis-
sioners will have the authority to
repeal the plan if it chooses.
The 3rd meeting of the CENTER FOR AFRO-
AMERICAN & AFRICAN STUDIES' Fall 1972
Colloquium on Africa will be conducted by:
Professor Harold G. Lawrence
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY-OAKLAND UNIVERSITY
Professor Lawrence's Colloquium address will focus on:
THE PRESENCE OF AFRICANS IN THE
NEW WORLD BEFORE COLUMBUS
ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE INVITED TO ATTEND
Tuesday, December 12, 1972
2402 MASON HALL-7 TO 9 P.M.

1

CHRISTMAS SALE CONTINUES
with MORE
OLUMBIAK CORDS
Boz S'Ile
KC 31384t#x KC a+s 31748' Y aN/r .~as:d
..-e'%b ....'-.. ,.~
KC 31734 KC 31743
I f~l1ALL RECORDS ON SALE 4
V ~ AN E EkJ~C c~k~~Av ~f~ERR~ 17 .°i

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