100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 12, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

,,v:.v.. S. S

High Court plans to rule on
gov. workers' political rights

Astronauts end ascent

Daily Official Bulletin

(Continued from Page 1)
in for your go." And he added: "It
better be a go," and the astro-
nauts laughed.
The checked the -,vstems "h

By AP and UPI brief to the Court that Gesell had or articles about classified CIA 'm111e d hasn't ch aged,"J.ch Itt
manifold hasn't changed," Schmitt
WASHINGTON - The Supreme removed "a cornerstone of the material without the agency's con- said.
Court yesterday agreed to review merit civil service system." sent. "The RCS (reaction control sys-
federal and state laws that keep The court also: Marchetti, of Vienna, Va., argued tem) hasn't changed. Ascent water
some 5.5 million government work- -Dismissed an appeal by Moose that the restraint imposed by two'hasn't changed. The batteries have-
ers from partisan political activity. Lodge 107 in Harrisburg, Pa., from lower courts was contrary to free- n't changed.
The federal law, known as the a Pennsylvania Supreme C o u r t dom of speech and to a 1971 ruling "Oh, my golly, only we have
Hatch Act, was struck down in decision that it must admit blacks that newspapers could publish por- changed."
July by ( three-judge panel here as guests if it serves any guests tions of the Pentagon papers. . And again they laughed.
on grounds that it is overly broad at all. The government said Marchetti,
and violates the workers' F i r s t The lodge had ar ued that by the who has written a novel about the "Oh, I'll tell you," said Schmitt.
Amendment rights. same reasoning the dining room agency's operations, signed a con- "That's something everyone's got
An Oklahoma law was upheld, of every private home in the coun- tract like all other CIA employes to do once in their life."
-meanwhile, in February by another try would be open to the publicInot to disclose any classified in- Once they disembarked, Mission
three-judge panel in Oklahoma City once guests who were not mem- formation, intelligence or know- Control had to interrupt the two
as a reasonable way to promote in- bers of the family ate there. ledge. moon venturers firmly as theya
tegrity in the public service. The appeal was dismissed unani- The former executive assistant chattered excitedly about their
The Supreme Court will begin to mously "for want of a substantial ;to the deputy director of the CIA ing site.
resolve the Hatch Act conflict with question." . needed the votes of four justices to As Schmitt raced about his tasks
hearings in early spring. A final Last J 6-3 vote the high be heard. He missed by one, with on the lunar surface, Houston
decision is expected by the end court indirectly upheld the lodge's only Justices William Douglas, Wil- warned him that telemetry showed
of June. xt ham Brennan Jr. and Potter Ste- his suit cooling water wastwarm-
racial exclusivity by finding it had wart agreeable to consider his ap- ing up and advised him to regu-j
The federal law has been on the no constitutional obligation to serve late it or slow down.
books since 1939 and was upheld Negroes simply because it held a peal.
by the Supreme Court in 1947- Pennsylvania liquor license. -Let stand a lower court ruling "I'm just a hot geologist, that's
Since then, however, the concept Both cases stem from the same which business spokesmen s a i d all," Schmitt replied.'
of the First Amendment's guaran- incident: the refusal ofmthe lodge would legalize union demands for Cernan invited Schmitt to stop
tee of freedom of association has ,in 19tto servedinner toK ero companywide bargaining. work for a moment and take a
broadened. rvis_ a black who is majorit lead- The dispute arose during a 1967l

f
T
t
. L
. 1
i
f
:
l 1
I
r
' +K
t
i
}
.
E
.
'
1
I
i
{

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12
From the most airless prairie DAY CALENDAR
ever touched by man, came the School of Music: Tuba Student Re-
melodious tones of Cernan: "Oh, cital, SM Recital Hall, 12:30 pm.
bttky m no onthe oneprarie Physics Special Seminar: A. Bussian.
bu'y me not on the lone prairie, Echo Lake, "An Optical Model of High
where the coyotes howl and the Energy Nucleon Interactions, 2038 Ran-
winds blow free." dall Lab, 2 pm.
Cernil ws had pu to eep Physics Seminar: T. Brown. Beil Tel.
Cernan was hard put to keep up Labs. "Electronic Surface States Out-
with the bubbly, vocal Schmitt. As side Liquid Helium," P&A Colloquium
he stood on the footpads of the Rm., 4 pm.
lunar lander, Challenger, he said: Physics Seminar: R. 'Worden Ruther-
ford Lab, "Rg-egeut"208Rn
"As I step off at the surface of dall Lab, 4 pm
Taurus-Littrow, we'd like to dedi- Anthropology: J. Fischer, Tulane U.,
cate the first step of Apollo 17 to "Panapran Words for Large Numbers,"
Rack ham Amnph., 4 pm.
all those who made it possible." school of Music: Flute Student Re-
And then his composure left him. cital, SM Recital Hall, 4:30 pm.
Afroamerican & African Studies Lee-
"Jack, I'm out here. Oh, my ture: H. G. Lawrence, Oakland U.,; "The
golly. Unbelievable. Unbelievable," I Presence of Africans in the New
he shouted to his moon-mate, whose World Beforetolumbus," 2402 Mason
Hall, 7 pm.
nickname is Jack. School of Music: U. Symphonic wind
Mission Control awakened the Ensemble, Sydney Hodkinson, con-
astronautsearlyyesterdayfor ctor; Daniel Eller, piano guest colo-
asrnus ery ysedy fo ist, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
their big day by playing a record- Residential College Concert: Residen-
ing of the pop song "City of New tial Coll. Singers, RC Aud., 8 pm.
Orleans," which includes the Zoology Lecture: A. S.,Romer, M-
phrase, Good morning, America mate Evolution," Rackham Amph., 8
-the name of the ship. pm.

Tuesday, December 12, 197:
for people who
walk on the earth
tt
EARTH SHOES
simulate walking bare-
foot in sand
Give Soweane You Love Immecdiately straightens one's
postutre. R
EARTH SHOES
for Xmas
Incredibly Comfortable
EARTH BOOTS and
GIFT CERTIFICATES
Now Available a~IO
662-0757
OPEN 10 A.M.-6 P.M.
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL 302 N. FIFTH AVE.
tI

The Most Useful Coupon You May Ever Rip Ou

Judge Gerhard Gesell delayed'
the effect of his decision on the
Hatch Act in July until it could
be appealed by the Justice Depart-
ment. The Department said in its

tc~, QW %W1 i 1aU1y
er of the state House of Repre- strike against the Phelps-Dodge, "Ah," jeered the geologist,j
sentatives. Corp., by 33 locals representing "you've seen one earth and you've
-Refused to hear the claim by employes of the copper firm. seen them all."
the father of one of the four stu- The National Labor Relations They started joking.
dents slain in the Kent State shoot- Board upheld an unfair labor prac-i Schmitt, referring 'to a rake for
ings in May 1970, that Ohio is un- tices charge against the unions but collecting samples, parodied Wil-
constitutionally shielding itself a U.S. appeals court overruled the liam Shakespeare: "My kingdom
from damage suits. The justices finding. for a scoop."
noted that the issue raised by Ar-- -
thur Krause, whose daughter Al-
lison was killed, presented no sub-
stantial federal question. UAC PRODUCTION
-Rejected, 6-3, an appeal by
Victor Marchetti, a former official
of the Central Intelligence Agency COME ON OUT AND PARTY
(CIA) banned from writing books with

Say lt, Sell It, Seek lt-Thru Daily Classifieds

AD COPY:

s axaE m =is

--T--

_.

unIiversity cellar
december hours
9 am to 10 pm weekdays
9 am to 5 pm Saturdays
12 am to 5 pm Sundays

SALM AGUNDI
"AFTER CLASSES BASH"

UNCONTRACTED CLASSIFIED RATES
WORDS I day 2 days 3 days 4 days 5 days 6 days add.
0-10 1.00 2.00 2.40 3.20 3 90 4.50 .55
11-15 1.5 2.30 2.90 3.q0 480 5.60 .75
16-20 1.30 '2.60 3.60 4.80 5.90 6.80 .85
21-25 1.55 3.10 4.30 5.70 7.00 8.10 1.05."
26-30 1.30 3.60 5.00 6.60 8 10 9.40 1.20
31-35 2.05 4.10 5.65 7.40 9.05 1 u.50 1.35
36-40 2.30 4.60 6.30 8.20 10.00 11.60 1.50'
41-45 2.55 5.10 6.95 9 00 10.95 12.70 1.65
46-50 2.80 5.60 7.60 9.80 11.90 13.80 1.80,
INCH ES
1 2.80 5.60 7.60 9.80 11.90 13.80 1.80
2 5.20 10.40 14.65 19 1-0 23 45 27.60 3.60
3 7.40 14.80 21.10 27.60 34.00 40.20 5.40
4 9.40 18.80 26.95 35.30 43.55 51.60 7.20
5 11.20 22.40 32.20 42.20 52.10 61.80 9.00
N B.: Each group of characters counts as one word
Hyphenated words over 5 characters count as two words
(this includes telephone numbers)
10 lines eauals 1 inch 5 words per line

WORDS

NO. OF DAYS DESIRED

PRICE

NAME

PHONE

DEC. 14-90 p.m. to 12 p.m.

I I I

UNION BALLROOM

For
A&,

bookings call
A Productions
769-0800

ADDRESS

checks payable to:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
420 Maynard Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48104

$1 at the door

r

1

NEW LS&A
The following is a listing of recent changes or additions
to the course listing for the College of LS&A, effective
Winter 1973. Any questions about the courses listed be-

cou

SES

I

TER

'73

low should be referred to the sponsoring department. The
secretary there should also be able to tell you about any
courses which do not appear on this list.

Other sources of course information include the Fresh-
man-Sophomore (1213), Junior-Senior (1223) and Student
(1018) Counseling Offices, located on the first floor of
Angell Hall.(+ = see catalog for more information)

AFRO-AMERICAN and AFRICAN STUDIES cross-lists the following
courses, winter '73:

+AFRO/POLI SCI 351 (
AFRICA." SAMOFF.

2-4) "THE STRUGGLE FOR S.

+AFRO/POLI SCI 451 (2-4) "GOVERNMENTS &
POLITICS OF LATIN AMERICA." SAMOFF.
AFRO/'R.C. HUMSA312E(4) "AFRO-LITERATURE."
MICHELENA, RAMSEY.
Sampling of the trends of black literature in the Americas; em-
phasis on contemporary written works (intranslation, when ap-
propriate) of all genres; attention will necessarily be paid to the
history of black arts. Paintings, sculpture, performing arts will be
examined. Three, areas of maior concentration: Afro-American,
Afro-French, Afro-Hispanic. Approach will be chronological &
geographical.
AFRO 334/SPEECH COMM. & THEATRE 333 (3) "BLACK
THEATRE WORKSHOP." YOUNG.
The beginning course in acting taught from a black perspective
with lab work in voice and movement.
AMERICAN STUDIES/HUMS./UNIV. CRSE. 402 (3) "AMERI-
CAN FOLKLORE." LOCKWOOD
A general introduction to the study of folklore: origins, forms,
functions, processes of transmission, and methods of collection
and analysis of verbal and nonverbal traditional expression. Em-
phasis will be placed on American Folklore, but comparative
material will be drawn from a variety of societies. Special con-
cern will be given to the role of folklore in contemporary life.
ANTHRO!LINGUISTICS 141 (4) "LANGUAGE IN SOCIETY."
BURLING.
An introduction to the systematic study of language and of the
place, of language in society. Fundamental concepts of linguistics
will be considered and applied to the role of folklore in contem-
porary life.
ANTHRO 455 (3) "WEST EUROPEAN PEASANTS SINCE
FEUDALISM." BLOK. (ONE OFFERING ONLY)
Relation of commercialization and State Formation Processes to
the Transformations of West European Peasantries.
ANTHRO 460, 473-now 3-4 credits. ANTHRO 583 - now 4
credits. BEARDSLEY
ANTHRO 486 3) "ANDEAN CIVILIZATION." EARLS.
(ONE OFFERING ONLY)
A structural analysis of kinship, political organization and cos-
mology in the Inka Empire and among the modern Quechua and
Aymara communities.
ASTRONOMY 112 (4) "INTRODUCTORY ASTRONOMY:
STARS, NEBULAE, AND GALAXIES." TESKE, MOHLER.
Prerequisits no longer exclude students who have taken college
physics.

+CCS 573, 574 - prerequisite changed to "CCS 476"
CCS 575 (3) "COMPILER CONSTRUCTION." CCS 476, Pre-
requisite. RIDDLE (Formerly "Data structures and com-
piling Techniques.")
Introduction to compiling techniques including parsing algorithms,
semantic processing and optimization. With the aid of a compiler
writing system, the student implements-a compilter for a substan-
tial programming language.
CCS 662/CICE 668 (3) ,"ADVANCED THEORY OF SYS-
TEMS AND AUTOMATA." Prereq. CCS 552, or ECE 467,
and Math 517 or P.I.' ZEIGLER. (Formerly "Algebraic
Theory of Automata.")
The concepts & formalisms of mathematical systems theory are
introduced. The relation between structure and behavior and the
decomposition of systems are. discussed in the context of finite
automata, linear systems and tree automata. The use of systems
concepts in modelling is also considered.
ENGLISH 342 (3) "LITERATURE & CULTURE." (ONE OF-
FERING ONLY) Section 001: "Modern African Literature"
JOHNSON. (Cross listed with AAAS)
The literature of modern Africa. A study of significant works
written mainly in English by important African writers in the
light of the forces and influences that have shaped modern Afri-
can literature from inside and outside.
Section 002: "Literature of the Modern South" GIPSON.
A study of major Southern writers considered in light of social
and cultural factors which contributed to the development of a
uniquely modernist literature. Attention will be given to the criti-
cism and representative creative writing of fugitive-agrarians and
to the fiction of William Faulkner, Katherine Ann Porter, Thomas
Wolfe, Erskine Caldwell, and Ellen Glasgow.
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 420, 421. Add to the prereqs. in
catalog: "Permission must be granted by Director prior to
enrollment.
FELL - JAPANESE 493 (2) "METHODS OF TEACHING JAP-
ANESE AS A SECOND LANGUAGE." NAGARA, KATO.
Course is designed to prepare our graduate students to teach
fundamental Japanese courses. Theories of historical development
and methods of teaching will be discussed. Students will be fa-
miliarized with aural-oral teaching techniques and introduced to
the use of audio-visual aids. Class visitations and practice teach-
ing will be an integral part of the course.
GREAT BOOKS 203 (4) "GREAT BOOKS OF THE MODERN
WORLD"
Will examine a number of the philosophical, literary, and scien-
tific works which are central to modern culture.
HISTORY 496 (4UG;3G) "PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHONALY-
SIS." HOLMES.
Will focus on the, interpretation of philosophy, psychoanalysis and
history as a methodological approach toward an interpretative
nnlvsis of the relationshin betweon the individual and society.

HISTORY 437, 438, 469, 477, 478, 511, 535, 565, 566, 663 -
please see Departmental office secretaries for information
about changes in course title, credit hours, description,
and/or course number, effective Winter '73.
JOURNALISM/SNR 476 (3) "WRITING ABOUT ENVIRON-
MENT." SANDMAN. P.I. and 301/302.
To equip students with requisite researching, writing and editing
skills needed to communicate with general audences about their
own environmental work or the environmental work of others.
JOURNALISM 544, 590, 591 (now 490) - see department sec-
retary for changes effective Winter '73.
NELL 570 (3-4) "LITERARY ANALYSIS AND THEORY 11,
(Seminar) WINDFUHR.
Recent theoretical approaches to literature and analytical meth-
odology. Working material; selected specimens from Near Eastern
Literatures.
PHYSICS 126-- sections 025, 026. ZORN. (in cooperation
with R.C.)
"Physics of Photography." These special lecture, rec. sections of
P-126 will concentrate on the physics of photographic process and
of the related apparatus. Electromagnetism, optics, and atomic
structure will be discussed with a continuing emphasis on the
understanding of these points most relevant to photography.
Course will not cover actual camera or darkroom techniques, nor
will there. be much consideration of the chem, related to photog-
raphy. More info: Jens Zorn, 1070 Randall Lab/111 Green, East
Quad (764-4450)
PHYSICS 256 "REVOLUTIONARY CONCEPTS OF MODERN
PHYSICS." (2) HENYEY.
Primarily a lecture course. See department for specific topics to
be covered.
PHYSICS 285 "PHYSICS OF MUSIC." (3) WEINREICH.
Lectures/Lab, designed to acquaint the student with the physical
basis of music. No prior formal knowledge of either physics or
music theory is required; reasonably strong interest in music is
assumed, as well as a willingness to combine ear and mind in an
attempt to analyze the ohenomena involved. Topics: nature of
sound, properties of musical tones, dynamics of vibrating bodies,
harmonic series . .. etc.
PHYSICS/R.C. SOC. SCI. 211 (3) "ARE THERE GLOBAL
CRISES?" KANE.
Critical study of social, global and environmental problems with
a scientific or technological aspect. Attention is paid to separat-
ing the social or political aspects of a problem from the tech-
nological ones and to understanding alternative technological
futures. Implications of the finite earth are studied in terms of
population, resources, energy use, pollution an( possible environ-
mental catastrophe, etc. No science background is assumed. In-
terested non-science majors from diverse fields encouraged,
science majors allowed.
POLITICAL SCIENCE 443, 449 - see dept. secretary for course
modifications, Winter '73.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES-SPANISH 206 (1) "PRACTICAL
SPANISH."
A continubtion course in the active practical use of Spanish, for
non-concentrators who wish to keep their proficiency. All work
done in class periods. 2 hrs. per week.
SLAVIC 446 (3) ''COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF 20TH CEN-
TURY RUSSIAN, ENGLISH, AMERICAN POETRY.
BRODSKY.
A continuation of Russian 445. Content, goals, audience will be
similar to those of 445.
SOCIOLOGY 376, 377, 378, 551 /SW 502: delete from Announce-
ment, effective Winter '73.
SOC. 541 (3) "CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE SOCIETY: CON-
VERGENCE THEORY" (Formerly Soc. 422.)
SOC. 436 (4) "INTRODUCTION TO URBAN RESEARCH."
TILLY. Soc. 210 and 336, prereq.
SPEECH COMM. & THEATRE 517; Sp./Journ. 420 - delete from
Announcement; Speech 482, 333, 211 -- see dept. for
modifications, effective Winter, '73.
Full-term University courses, new for Winter, and announced earlier
include 402, "AMERICAN FOLKLORE;" 405, "WINTER
ECOLOGY;" 450, "HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOP-
MENT." Please see the departmental office personnel
(2501 LS&A Bldg) for further information.
ZOOLOGY 220 (4) HUBBELL, VANDERMEER, HAIRSTON.
Zoology 106 or equivalent. Primarily for Inteflex students;
others by P.I.
The diversity of animal life and the biological world in which
man has evolved. Presentation of the principles of population
dynamics and ecological constraints on man's future, with em-
phasis on evolutionary mechanisms and the importance of the
comparative method of scientific thought.
The following University Courses are all mini-courses; they will be
less than a- full-term in length, and are for one offering only:
Winter, 1973. Further information on each course will be made
available in and around the Counselinq offices later in the term,
when one can register via a drop/add form for no more than two
mini-courses for this term. Other mini-courses are anticipated for
the Winter; please watch for information as it is circulated prior to
the registration/first class meeting of the particular mini-course.

UNIV. COURSE 414 (1) "
ITY CONFERENCE."
ONE OFFERING ONLY.

THE COMING EUROPEAN SECUR-
ZIMMERMAN, M.C..

This mini-course will be concerned with European security prob-
lems after the Nixon-Soviet leadership talks this year. Four public
lecturesrand small se.minar sections. Short papers. (March, '73)
Speakers include Dr. Robin Remington, M.I.T.; A. Rloss Johnson,
Rand Corp.; Dr. Arsen Jovanovic, U. of Pittsburgh; on additional
European scholar or two. Watch for further announcements in
and around Counseling Offices. Pass/fail.
UNIV. COURSE 317 (1} "COMMODITY FORM SOCIETIES
AND THE LITERATURE OF LATIN AMERICA." ONE OF-

CHEMISTRY 117 (1)
KUCZKOWSKI.

"INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING."
(see Department)

CLASSICAL STUDIES. LATIN 453 (3) "SALLUST"
SHACKLETON-BAILEY.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan