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December 12, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-12

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Tuesday, December 12, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Shop at
Folletts
for BOOKS for
Christmas Presents
DIAL: 5-6290
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By HERB BOWIE
A huge crowd at Crisler Arena
was treated to an evening of
generally fine music Saturday
night at the Allman Brothers
Concert.
The first group, the Rockets,
provided the exception to my op-
ening generalization. A group
from Detroit (having nothing to
do with another band called the
Rockets - later known as Crazy
Horse - that played with Neil
Young), it played the kind of
get-down, Stones-and-Chuck-Ber-
ry derivative, primal rock 'n'
roll to be heard in thousands of
bars across the country. This
kind of music can be played
well, of course-Michigan's own
Bob Seger is great at it - but
when a mediocre band like the
Rockets does it there's nothing
more tiring. Since the concert
would have been a good four
hours long even without the Roc-
kets, the group's performance
was really suerflous.
Dr. John's band followed,
warming up the audience for the
Night Tripper himself. Making
his customarily spectacular en-
trance, the Louisiana shaman
shuffled onto stage with a com-
plete headdress, sequined beard
and face, full-length white tas-
seled coat, and a feathered
sceptre that he soon traded for
a guitar. His two female back-

Aliman Brothers
Concert exciting

up singers, dressed similarly but
more conservatively, made their
discreet entrance at this time as
well.
Although carefully planned
showmanship characterized Dr.
John's act, there was nothing
artificial about his music. His
band provided an unspectacular
but thoroughly funky back-up.
The contrast between his earthy,
sandpaper voice (Dylan at his
worst sounds like an opera sing-
er in comparison) and his back-
up singers' smooth, almost eth-
ereal vocals was beautifully dra-
matic.
The real magic, though, was in
Dr. John's musicianship. After
playing some concise guitar for
a couple of songs, he sat down
to his real instrument, the piano.
He played a dazzling set, prov-
ing himself aworthy graduate of
Professor Longhair's New Or-
leans school of rhythm and blues.
For the encore he picked up his
feathered scepter and switched
to pure voodoo music, closing the
performance with what's prob-
ably his most popular number,

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"I Walk on Gilded Splinters."
.. A forty-five minute intermis-
sion followed, which proved
about as superflous as the Roc-
ket's set. After everyone had
gotten refreshments, gone to the
john, and returned to their
seats, hundreds of people mutely
expressed their impatience by
raising lit matches and flaming
lighters in the darkened arena.
The silent plea added a nice
Christmas touch to the concert,
but it didn't seem to hurry the
band any.
The Allman Brothers finally
came on stage to give their
first concert since August. Two
personnel changes have been
made since that last appearance.
Someone named Williams, who
had worked with theaband be-
f o r e Berry Oakley's sudden
death, has replaced the group's
late bass player. Chuck Lovell,
tov.
tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 How Do Your Children Grow?
6:30 2 4 7 News
9 1 Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Your Right To Say It
710O 2 Seasons Greetings from Mike
Douglas
4 News
7 To Tell The Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 1 Love Lucy
56 French Chef
7:30 4 You Asked for It
7 Parent Game
9 Protectors
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 To Be Announced
8:00 2 Peanuts Cartoon
4 Hall of Fame
Temperatures Rising
9 Getting Together
56 Family Game
50 Dragnet
8:30 2 OnceUpon a Mattress
7 Movie
"Purusit,"
9 Pig and Whistle
56 Bill Moyers' Journal
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 4 Bold Ones
9 News
56 Common Ground
9:30 9 CBC White Paper
56 Black Journal
10:00 2 Don Rickles - Alive and
Kicking
4 America
7 Marcus Welby, M.D.
50 Perry Mason
56 Detroit Black Journal
10:30 56 Artist in America
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 That Good Ole Nashville Music
11:20 9 News
11:30 2 Apollo 17
4 Johnny Carson
7 Dick Cavett
50 Movie
12:00 2 Movie
"Separate Tables." (1958)
9 Movie
"The Scarface Mob." (1962)
1:00 4 News
7 Blue Angels
1:30 7 News
2:00 2 Movie
"Flying Wild." (1941)
3:30 2 News
HOLIDAY SPECIA-
SPRArEs
DEC.2( 3O
OPEN 1 PMM
FOREST

FIRES BURN
MORE
THAN
TREES

introduced as "the boy wonder,"
has been added on piano.
The group started out with
Greg Allman on rhythm guitar
and Dicky Betts playing slide
guitar. After a couple of songs
Greg moved to organ and, a few
songs later, Dicky pocketed his
slide.
Duane Allman 's wizardry was
missed, of course. Betts can't
really fill Duane's shoes as lead
guitarist, and those wonderful
twin guitar riffs are no longer
possible.
The group proved, though, that
it's still one of the best perform-
ing bands in America. Williams
proved to be an adequate re-
placement for Oakley on bass,
and Lovell's piano helped fill
the gap left by Duane's death.
The "boy wonder" played some
gorgeous piano, especially on
"Ain't Wasting Time No More"
and some of the other songs
played early in the set.. While it
was apparent that Lovell is not
yet a fully integrated part of the
Allman Brothers sound, re-
nowned for its tightness, his per-
formance offered some of the
evening's high points and much
promise for the band's future.
The group played some new
material as well as old stand-
ards. "Done Somebody Wrong,"
"Statesboro Blues," "Ain't Wast-
ing Time No More," "One Way
Out," "In Memory of Elizabeth
Reed," "Stormy Monday," "Mid-
night Rider," "Whipping Post,"
"You Don't Love Me" and "Les
Brers in A Minor" were the pre-
viously released songs perform-
ed. Although the band used sev-
eral of the songs as starting
points for some extended impro-
visation, the group never stretch-
ed anything over half-an-hour, as
it's sometimes wont to do.
One final note: if all Heaven's
angels can dance on the head of
a pin ,then I guess 15,000 people
should have been able to dance
on the floor of Crisler Arena Sat-
urday night. However, what hap-
pened was that, quite naturally,
the first people to be admitted
grabbed seats on the main floor
and camped there the entire con-
cert. There were a few people
boogying on the forward peri-
phery of the main floor, but that
hardly made the event a "dance

Grossness detracts
from show at Ark

By LORRE WEIDLICH
If you love good Scottish and
English traditional music enough
to be willing to endure flagrant
sexism and humor that managed
to appall even the greatest lov-
ers of dirty songs that I know,
you would have loved Saturday
night at the Ark.
The Friends of Fiddlers Green
are seven pleasant and talent-
ed men and women from Toron-
to's finest folk club, but two or
three or them were so gross that
by the end of the second set
large numbers of the audience
began to complain. Tam Kearn-
ey's statement that "once a wo-
man gets over the shock of be-
ing a feminist, she'll take any
man she can get" certainly did-
n't win him any friends among
the women in the audience.
But even these thing's didn't
obscure the considerable talent
all the performers had. I a n
Robb, with his flowing lyrical
voice, did some fine interpreta-
tions of traditional English songs
like "The Lass of Islington," and
both the women in the group,
Margo Kearney and Margaret
Crystal, sang strongly and well.
Margaret especially has a clar-
ity and precisioin to her voice
that made several of her songs
outstanding, including her duet
with Stu Cameron, "Wil Ye go,
Lassie, Go."
Stu and Tam have fine Scot-
tish voices and repertoires that
abound in off-color songs, as
does Jim Strickland. With his
impish smile and the twinkle in
his eye, though, Jim managed to
be charming regardless of what
he sang.
The real surprise of the eve-
ning was 'Grit' Laskin, a nice
Jewish boy from Toronto who
was totally out of place amongst
the other very British singers. He
was always sensitive and sang
mainly his own unique, often hu-
morous, songs. In fact, every-

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Greg Allman and Dicky Betts cookin' at Crisler

thing about him was pretty uni-
que - he played the strangest
banjo accompaniments I've ever
heard.
10
The Friends began the set with
some rousing dance tunes that
the audience welcomed enthus-
iastically. Instruments were abun-
dant, and everyone who played
anything played it well. One of
the high points instrumentally
was Ian's dulcimer accompani-

ment on "Sweet Thames, Flow
Softly." Intermixing accompan-
ied and unaccompanied songs
during the evening, the group
managed to include quite a few
American and non-traditional
songs among their more standard
British ballads and lyrics, a n d
consistently generated enthus-
iasm and spirit.
Music continued until well in-
to the night, and the third set
was by far the best of the eve-
ning. It's unfortunate that, with
the immense amount of talent
and the incredible repertoires
that the Friends of Fiddlers
Green have, they could not have
been a bit more selective about
their material during the first
two sets.

New Loggins and
Messina LP fine

Dr. John

concert," as it was billed. Since,
given the size of the crowd, the
lack of dancing was easily pre-
dictable, it's a mystery to me
why UAC - Daystar didn't put
chairs on the main floor and sell
reserved seats instead of gener-
al admission tickets.

By HARRY HAMMITT
About a year and a half ago
Jim Messina left his economic-
ally secure job as lead guitarist
for Poco, a band which he help-
ed to found along with Ritchie
Furay. His reason, ostensively,,
for leaving the band was that he
desired to produce, which seem-
ed credible because he had been
producing Poco for some time.
W e 1 1, apparently producing
wasn't enough to keep him satis-
fied ,so he teamed up with Ken-
ny Loggins to form a band. Last
year the band released their first
album; now they are back with
their second album which has
the creative title of Loggins and
Messina (Columbia KC 31748).
Sure enough, it's produced by
Jim Messina himself.
The band has something going
for them in the presence of Mes-
sina who by now is a known
quantity. But they have yet to
catch on in a big way. To help
them catch on, there is a fairly
massive publicity campaign go-
ing on in their behalf. Hype is
probably the most effective way
of becoming a star, but the most
satisfying way is to play good
music and play it well. Loggins
and Messina do -just that. Bless-
ed with this too rare attribute
plus a big publicity campaign,
I don't see how Loggins and Mes-
sina can miss: the answer is that
they probably can't and hope-
ftally they won't hecaise they're
like abreath of fresh air in
many ways.
To begin with, the band has a
lot of variety. They combine soul,
rock, rock 'n' roll, couintry, and
folk into a music that is really
alive and always interestine even
if it isn't completely original.
The music seems to grow by it-
self, nothing ever seems forced.
In many ways the spirit of the
music is analogous to- the music
of Van Morrison. There is no
real straight comoarison be-
tween the two brands of music,
but there exists a good deal of
empathy between the two forms.
The music that Loggins and
Messina play lies somewhere be-
tween the free, almost sponta-
neous, flow of the music on As-
tral Weeks, and the tightly con-
trolled precision of Moondance.
Whereas the contribution of Mor-

rison is probably an unconscious
one, there is an obvious debt to
Steve Stills. Messina's guitar-
work is very influenced by Stills
with the sort of flashing hesi-
tancy that comes out sounding
quite mellow. Messina was a sec-
ond generation member of Buf-
falo Springfield and his con-
nection with Stills is evident in
his musical approach.
The vocals are good: Loggins
probably has the better voice, A
voice that comes across as
strong folk, but has some of the
same tension as an Elton John.
Messina is a competent singer
who sounds real good when he
sings with Loggins.
There are a lot of things going
on here. There are a lot of
guests soloists and people who
just generally help out. Messina
is a tasteful -guitarist who plays
in a rather funky vein, but also
does some good low-key rock.
There is also a sax player and
fiddle player who turn up occa-
sionally with some interesting
playing. Loggins plays' acoustic
guitar and almost always stays
in the background, but he steps
out with some short harmonica
solos which -are tastefully sim-
ple.
There are a lot of nice things
about Loggins and Messina.
Foremost among their qualities
is their unpretentious approach
to a lively variety of material.
The music is always well per-
formed, but it never seems to
be anything but laid back and
tasteful. Loggins and Messina
are a fine pair. Their interaction
brings about some verytpleasant
and fine music. With their tal-
ents and the publicity campaign
being mounted in their behalf,
they're a cinch to be around for
awhile, and that's good news.
Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in review in g
ppetry, and music,
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
arts: contact Arts
Editor, c/o The
drama, dance, film,

CO UL(URa CALaNLA
FILM-AA Film Co-op shows Dunning's Yellow Submarine
at 7 and 8:45 in Aud. A. Lang's Western Union, present-
ed by Cinema Guild, can be seen in Arch. Aud. at 7 and
9:05. The Women's Studies Film Series screens The Wo-
man's Film at 7 in the UGLI Multi-purpose room.
MUSIC-The University Symphonic Wind Ensemble, con-
ducted by Sydney Hodkinson and with Daniel Eller as
guest piano soloist, can be heard in Hill at 8, courtesy
of the Music School. The RC Singers give a concert at 8
in the Residential College Auditorium.
- U

BOOKKEEPERS*
BOOK BUY BACK
IN
BALLROOM
FROM DECEMBER
18-23: 9 a.m.-6 p.m.
24-25: CLOSED
26-30: 12-5
31-1: CLOSED
AT YOUR
UNIVERSITY CELLAR

UNICEF XMAS CARDS
--NOW ON SALE -
AT
FISHBOWL-8 a.m.-5 p.m.
RIVE GAUCHE-8 p.m.-mindnite
Sponsored by: International Students Association
(if you want to help sell cards sign up at Fishbowl.
(Proceeds go to UNICEF)

"Z DAMN NEAR KNOCKS YOU OUT OF YOUR SEAT."

MODERN LANGUAGES AUDITORIUMS 3 & 4
7:30-6:30-9:30 p.m.

-New Yorker
$1.25 cont.

-COMING-
FRIDAY & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 15 -16

THE
. 15

Y SINGS 2nd SMASH
BLUES'HIT WEEK!
m . guAT. ADY

/MmnkAMzM

4
i

I

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