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December 07, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-12-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I hursday, December /, 19 /I

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BT
By BOB McGINN
It happens every year. In fact,
you can almost set your watch
by it.aAt thesbeginning ofweach
and every college basketball
season coaches across the coun-
try ballyhoo the caliber of play in
their respective leagues.
This time around, though, the
words emanating from the Big
Ten mentors carry an urgency
never heard before. Illinois coach
Harv Schmidt's comments typify
those of his colleagues: "Without
a doubt, from top to bottom, this
is the best group of basketball
players in Big Ten history."
Michigan head man Johnny Orr
elected to go even one step fur-
ther. "The Big Ten will play the
nation's best basketball in 1972-
73," he said.
73All right, fine. So the Big Ten
coaches have gone a little over-
board. Anybody would after the
1ignominious football record the
conference has compiled over the
past decade. But what do out-
side observers think about all this
overactive public relations work?
If you're former Iowa and
present Oregon State coach Ralph
Miller, you believe every word of
it. After his team's loss to Michi-
gan Monday night, Miller un-
equivocally stated, "Believe me,
the Big Ten has the best teams
from top to bottom in the country
this year."
Before discarding his com-
ments because of his old ties,
consider this. The Beavers are

en

bills

cage

V

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FOR MORE INFO, CoNrACT:
BOB STEWARD
HENDERSON FORD
769-7900
For stu*nts and taculty 21 and over
RENIT'ACAR

members of the Pac-8, which
plays fine basketball themselves
in addition to having UCLA as
one of its members. Miller cer-
tainly isn't endearing himself to
anybody with remarks like that.
No, there just may be a chance
that he means exactly what he
says.
So if Schmidt and Orr and
Miller are all right, what are
their reasons? The trio would tick
them off so fast it would make
your head spin:
* An incredible 39 of last
year's 50 starters return.
@ 11 of the loop's 14 top re-
bounders are back.
* The first four scorers return.
" A bevy of freshman and
sophomore talent dots every ros-
ter.
Thus, Big Ten fans are poised
for an exciting, evenly-matched
title chase this winter. Five
teams, perhaps even six or seven,
have a legitimate shot at crack-
ing the conference throne room.
But to do it, 1972's defending
champion, the Minnesota Go-
phers, will have to be dealt with.
And that won't be an easy task.
Last year fanatical rookie
coach Bill Musselman guided his
charges to the school's first out-
right championship since 1919.
All five regulars are back, along
with a trio of "can't miss" new-
comers, to make life miserable
for conference foes.
The Big Ten's MVP, Jim Brew-
er, along with mobile senior cor-
nerman Clyde Turner and Ron
Behagen, return to form a highly
formidable front line. 6-9 Corky
Taylor and 6-6 Dave Winfield,
who played so well in the late
stages of 1971-72, would start for
many clubs, but ride the pines
here. As Orr says, "When you
talk talent, you begin with Min-
nesota's big men."
The Gopher guards will be con-
sistent junior Keith Young and
mediocre Bob Nix. Junior college
transfer Bob Larsen and soph
HOLIDAY SPE CIAL
SPcciA'-
R.Az jj
2-30
OPEN i PM i .
MPt

Greg Olson, both 6-5, have per-
formed well in this season's early
games.
Musselman fully realizes that
his immensely able crew must
perform well to repeat. "As in
every other sport the biggest
job of all is to repeat as champs,
and that doesn't happen very
often in the Big Ten," he warns.
The principle roadblocks for
the Gophers appear to be Ohio
State and Michigan, although you
wouldn't know it if you had seen
them play thus far. The Buckeyes
have lost to lowly Washington
and *were forced into overtime
by Notre Dame before winning.
The Wolverines are 2-0, but have
been extremely sluggish.
Fred Taylor begins his 15th
season at the Buckeye helm with
everybody back from last year's
runner-up squad, except for sur-
prise MVP Mark Minor. Allan
Hornyak and 7-0 Luke Witte
spearhead the attack, which was
virtually nonexistent after the
brawl at Minneapolis.
"Our main asset is experi-
ence," Taylor said recently, and
with 6-7 cornerman Wardell Jack-
son and guard Dan Gerhard,
both regulars last year, he's
right. The other forward berth
has been occupied by 6-3 senior
Bob Siekmann and 6-7 soph Bill
Andreas.
At Indiana the Hurryin' Hoos-
iers have everybody back but
leading scorer Joby Wright. But
with pivotman Steve Downing,
swingman John Ritter, freshman
Quinn Buckner, and guards Boot-
sie White and Frank Wilson,
Coach Bob Knight's aggregation
should be a definite factor in the
race.
Perhaps the biggest victory in
the Big Ten's current 17-6 record
has been the Iowa Hawkeye's
upset of eighth-ranked Kentucky
earlier this week. Coach Dick
Schultz' veteran team must rate
a definite darkhourse as they,
too, have four veterans return-
ing.
The Hawks are led by 7-0 sky-
scraper Kevin Kunnert, flashy
guard Rick Williams, and 6-7
forwards Neil Fegebank and Jim
Collins.

prunch
There's talk of title up in East
Lansing, with the Spartans pos-
sessing three superior performers
in 6-7 center Bill Kilgore, 6-8
soph Lindsay Hairston, and guard
Mike Robinson. But unless Gus
Ganakas can come up with some-
body other than his 5-5 son Gary
and forward Allen Smith as his
other regulars, it'll be the same
old story: second division status.
Purdue's Boilermakers and Il-
linois' Illini both appear to be
improved from a year ago. New
Riveter coach Fred Schaus has
tough forward Frank Kendrick
and 6-11 John Garrett, but little
at guard. Schmidt has two po-
tential all-league cagers in Nick
Weatherspoon and Duke transfer
Jeff Dawson, but no center.
Northwestern and Wisconsin
can't help but be better, since
they both have almost everyone
still around. The 'Cats will look
to Greg Wells and Mark Sibley,
while Badger mentor John Pow-
less hopes the Hughes twins and
Leon Howard can save his job.
An indication of the enthusiasm
surrounding this year's race is
the ticket situation at Minnesota.
The Gophers sold out their 17,500
plus seat Williams Arena a month
ago, and here at Michigan, season
ticket sales reached an all-time
high of 9,500.

NI

--Daily Photo
MINNESOTA FORWARD Dave Winfield (31) hauls down a rebound
against Michigan's Ken Brady (15) in Michigan's 64-52 victory at
Crisler Arena last year. The defending Big Ten champion Gophers
will be hard pressed to repeat this year.

E

__
__ _ __ -

1i*.

II
S I
'iI
Ii

NON-ORDINARY STATES OF REALITY
IN BUDDHIST TRANCE
LECTURE BY
DR. LEWIS LANCASTER
from U.C., Berkeley'

ATHLETIC GRANTS CUT, TOO
Big Ten-abandons USOC

CHICAGO (P)-The Big Ten with- ulty group, said the Big Ten was
drew yesterday from its United dropping its class E membership,
States Olympic Committee mem- with three votes on the U.S.O.C.
bership, the first athletic confer- "on the same grownds as the"
ence to follow the break by the NCAA."
NCAA with the Olympic group in! "This is no intention to impair*
October. or destroy the Olympic movement,
'Th'bnrtinn gnnnnr~d 'G Rigbut we hope this action will pre-

f
t

ne acuon was d Ia OUd Dg
Ten faculty representatives and
athletic directors concluded their
three-day winter business meeting
at which operational economy was
keynoted.
MARCUS PLANT of Michigan,
chairman of the policy-making fac-

Thurs.-4 p.m.

Modern Langauges Bldg.

Aud. IV

i

cipitate congressional or other ap-
propriate action to remedy the
way the U.S.O.C. administers its
affairs," Plant said.
ALSO IN THE interests of ath-
letic economy, the Big Ten reduced
the number of total basketball
tenders from 24 to 18 and re-
affirmed a previous proposal to
HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE ITS
NEW TRENDS FOR 1973
TRIMS-SHAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
2 SHOPS
0611 E. University
" 615 E. Liberty
Dascola Barbers

limit to 15 full tenders annually
for varsity sports beyond football
and basketball. However, the 15
te-ders can be split on the basis
of tuition, board, or room into 45
Ssegments.
At the same time, the Big Ten
officials sought to avoid a too
stringent reduction of minor sports
by ruling that to remain a con-
ference member each school must
conduct varsity competition in six
other sports beyond football and
basketball. The Big Ten has cham-
pionship competition now in base-
ball, track, swimming, wrestling,
golf, cross country, fencing, tennis
and gymnastics.
Billboard
The Michigan track team will
sponsor their Annual Holiday
Preview Meet tomorrow night,
Friday, Dec. 8, at Yost Field
House. Field events begin at 6:30
and track events start at 7:00.

As part of a series: Dimensions of Religious Experience
SPONSORED BY THE OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS

GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8

11

Noon

Luncheon-35c

u

i __ .-=-
E

TURN IN YOUR YOUTH CARD
FOR TWA's.
YOU'LL GET A TOP LP ALBUM
AND A WHOLE LOT OF THE WORLD
FOR FREE.

EDWARD LIU, China Studies
"THE OVERSEAS CHINESE PROBLEMS
AND DILEMMAS"
(Series: "China, Its People and Relationships")

I

Join The Daily Ad Staff

WARNER/REPRISE

4'

RECORD

S

7 tS;
=.e .

0'

It may sound funny to turn in your card for a free
TWA card, but it's worth it. If you turn in your
American or United or whatever other airline's youth
card you have to your campus representative or any

TWA counter (or pay $3 for a new one, if you don't
have one to turn in), you'll get more than any other
airline offers you. Maximum discounts on TWA and
all other airlines, more free things and, on top of all
that, a free album.

FREE ALBUM-FIRST 10,000.
First, you'll get a Record Club of America coupon Plus a free lifetime membership in Record
good for your choice of a free top album worth up to Club of America, with no obligation to buy any
$6.98. From a list of over 100 incredibles. Like Three record. The offer's limited to the first 10,000, so
Dog Night, Neil Diamond, Roberta Flack, Elton John. you've got to do it soon.
FREE MONEY-SAVING COUPONS.

JONI

MITCH ELL

"FOR THE ROSES"

When you land in any of six cities (London, ,
Boston, Paris, Los Angeles, San Francisco or Denver)
with your TWA card, you'll get a brochure
full of hundreds of dollars' worth of deals. And we
mean deals. Like absolutely free or 50% off.
What we did was to talk to students in those
cities and ask where they'd take their friends-not
BOSTON FREEBEES.
FREE
A spaghetti dinner at the "Spaghetti Emporium, Inc.,"
just off Harvard Square.
FREE
Breakfast in the "Pewter Pot Muffin House"
(14 locations) where many Harvard students stop
first in the morning.
. FREE
Admission to the "Prudential Center Skywalk," the
first place to go to get your bearings in Boston.
FREE
Combination health food platter from "Corners of
the Mouth" restaurant. A healthy buffet of hot and
cold dishes.
FREE
Quiche lorraine and cup of coffee at "La Crepe:'
FREE
Indian soup and vegetable curry at the "India Sweet
House" restaurant in Cambridge.
FREE
Pair of earrings or pendant (and watch it being made)
at "Whaler's Wharf."

just the "in" places, but the spots that only the
knowing would know about. And those are the ones
we give you free dinners, drinks, club memberships or
discounts in. Here are just some of the absolutely
free things you'll get in London and Boston, as an
example of what TWA has arranged for you in all
the cities.
LONDON FREEBEES.
FREE
Admission to any of ten Greyhound Racing Tracks.
A great English sport.
FREE
Membership and drink at "La Valbonne," one of the
toughest clubs to get a membership in, even for
Londoners.
FREE
A full breakfast at your choice of 10 Quality Inns,
famous for their hearty fare.
FREE
A pint of "Watney's Red Barrel" in "The Prospect of
Whitby," or your choice of over 40 London pubs.

$3.17

AMERIC
"HOMECOMING"

$3.17

BONI

RAItT

"GIVE IT UP"

$3.17

U.&Lf~ m £~TTT'1

=I

I

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