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December 07, 1972 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1972-12-07

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Thursdoy, December 7, 1.972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursdoy, December 7, 1.972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

BOX OFFICE OPENS TOMORROW! 12:30-5:00 P.M.

THE
UNIVERSITY
r PL AYE RS
proudly presents
BY ANN JELLICOE
DEC. 6 thru DEC. 9-
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

RC Players.. .
community theatre

r

"An original and demented romp, with wild humor and inescapable
laughter." New York Times

Ticket Information
Individual Tickets: $3 and $2

Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office open 12:30-5:00 p.m.
(until 8:00 on
performance days)
Box Office phone: 668-6300

Dept. of Speech Communication and TheatreI
this Friday and Saturday night
the irreducible Friends of Newsreel
will continue its program of fine films

Frank Zappa
Ringo Starr
Eric Clapton

200 MOTELS
The Mothers of Invention
-PLUS-

CREAM
Jack Bruce

Ginger Baker

in their last performance together in the Royal
Albert Hall in London-historic.
a dollar-fifty double-feature
TONIGHT-
don't miss the latest episode in the SGC follies, in
which treasurer David Schaper attempts to impose
a poice state on Michigan film groups Room 3X
Michigan Union

FREE

7:30

FREE

paid political advertisement

By JEFF SORENSEN
"The people in RC Players are
more committed because they're
not getting credit or grades.
They do it because they want
the experience, and that spirit
comes through in their perform-
ances," says Peter Ferran, fac-
ulty adviser to the Residential
College Players.
The RC Players' drama is
unique among University theater
groups. It is theater produced
largely for the Residential Col-
lege community primarily by
those people who live in East
Quad.
"This community audience is
great to play to; it's a commun-
ity in the truest sense of the
word. The audience is very per-
ceptive; if something is bad,
"The people in RC Players
are more committed because
they're not getting credit or
grades. They do it because they
want the experience, and that
spirit comes through in their
performances.
-Peter Ferran
you'll know it immediately,"
comments Richard Sale, presi-
dent of the Players.
The group is three years old.
It began simply as a group of
interested drama students who
"got together for some theater."
This idea still prevails today, al-
though the Players have enlarged
the organization and the pro-
ductions.
Two major productions are
generally presented by the group
each term. These presentations
are both student and faculty-di-
rected, and work on the plays
is completely open to all mem-
bers of the RC community.
A ten-member board of the
group approves the directors and
the plays they wish to produce,
and the directors are then given
complete control over the casting
and handling of their own plays,
using RC Players' resources.
THUR.
D.W. GRIFFITH
WAY DOWN
EAST
1920. Gaslight melodrama in
which Lillian Gish is ostracized
for having an illegitimate child.
Her performance "is remark-
able for its range of emotion
.. the flight through the
storm, the. ice scenes, & the
split-second r e s c u e remain
triumphs of direction, camera
placement & editing."
-Mueum of Modern Art
FRI.
Griffith.
Orphans of
the Storm
Donald Sosin plays the piano at
the 7:00 show.
Architecture
Auditorium
7 & 9 p.m. 75c

Productions are always held
in the East Quad Auditorium
and shown to the general public.
RC people may go free; others
are generally charged admission.
Usually, most of the audience is
from East Quad.
RC Players is financed by
the RA (Residential Assembly),
the RC community government)
and by box office receipts. The
budget is generally quite low and
limits what can be produced. For
example, The Three Sisters by
Chekhov, which they will pre-
sent next term, calls for one set
change during the course of the
play. The Players simply don't
have the resources for such a
change, so they must make do
without it.
Because of financial limita-
tions and also because it is dif-
ficult to find enough people to
work on the technical aspects,
the plays tend to have some-
what of a workshop atmos-
phere. "The simpler, less tech-
nical one-act format is more na-
tural for us because it lends it-
self to concentrating more on
simply acting and directing,"
says President Richard Sale.
The House of Bernarda Alba
by Garcia Lorca was presented
earlier this term. The Dumb-
waiter by Harold Pinter and
Miss Julie by August Strindberg
were presented last weekend.
The production of Miss Julie was
unique for the Players because it
was more of a period piece, while
(WABX-Airwaves) Because of
her "reputation as an agitator,"
Joan Baez was denied permis-
siow to give a concert at the
Utah State Prison. Ernest Wright,
the state corrections director,
also explained his decision to
deny permission to Baez by say-
ing, "Doesn't it make you sus-
picious as to why they want her
to perform at the prison?"
tov
tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Sewing Skills
6:30 2 4 7 News
9 I Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Secretarial Techniques
and Office Procedures
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Bill Moyers' Journal

generally the Players have done
more contemporary works.
Next term the players will
present The Lesson by Eugene
Ionesco directed by Bargie Hum-
phreys and Something Unspoken
by Tennessee Williams directed
by Keven Cooper, two one-act
plays, in late February. They will
also present The Three Sisters
by Anton Chekhov directed by
Douglass Sprigg in early April.
In addition to these larger ef-
forts, there may also be some
other dramatics activities pro-
duced under the auspices of the
RC Players. A Readers Theater
to be presented in the Halfway
Inn, the East Quad snack bar, as
well as a dance program have
been proposed.
Also, the Players have present-
ed summer theater with a major
production these last two sum-
mers, although nothing is yet
definite for this summer. Last
summer Marat/Sade by Peter
Weiss was done.

THE AUSTRAL STRING QUARTET,
D~onald Hazelwood, Violin; Ronald
Ryder, Violin; Ronald Cragg, Viola;
Gregory Elmaloglou, Cello. Tuesday,
Dec. 5, Rackham Auditorium. Cham-
ber Arts Series of the University Mu-
sical society. Quartet No. 9 -Wer-
der; Quartet No. 8 in C minor, Op.
110 - Shostakovich; String Quartet
Music, No. 8 - Sculthorpe; Quartet
in G Major, K. 387 - Mozart.
By ROY CHERNUS
There isn't exactly an abun-
dance of prominent musicians
who hail from Australia (al-
though one should rather speak
of Australia as lacking in instru-
mentalists, for the great oper-
atic prima donnas Joan Suther-
land and Marilyn Horne have
established Australia at the top
of the vocal field).
The Austral String Quartet's

concert Tuesday seemed to be a
mission by its four musical dip-
lomats to exhibit Australia's ad-
vanced but little known cultural
status. They succeeded admir-
ably in dispelling, the obscurity
of their country's newly devel-
oped musical identity with their
impeccable musicianship, and
selection of repertoire (half the
program consisted of works by
modern Australian composers).
The program of obscure con-
temporary works (except the Mo-
zart), was far from the common
fare of many programs which
are sure to produce sellouts. It
was gratifying to hear an ensem-
ble innovative enough artistical-
ly to bring forth new, rarely
heard works to the public, a
trend which should be encourag-
ed. The two contemporary Aus-
tralian works by Werder and
Sculthorpe were avant-garde,
employing unconventional 'free
form' rhythmic structures and
sound patterns. The full exploi-
tation of the instrument's sonor-
ous capabilities in these works
resulted in a variety of unusual
tonal effects including glissan-
doed harmonics, frenetic pizzica-
ti, scrapings, striking the strings
and the instrument bodies them-
selves and bestial squawks.
Though interesting in these ef-
fects, the Werder piece as a
whole did not work well like the
Sculthorpe piece. Its many short
sections composing a collage of
fragmented atonal landscapes
lacked essential direction, devel-
opment, and cohesion. The de-
tailed program notes explained
Werder as having obtained from
Bartok an escape from the late-
Romanticism of Europe with new
'muscularity and vital articula-
tion' in a freer compositional
structure than Bartok's.This was
quite apparent in the complex
work, but unfortunately, Werder
lost Bartok's emotional defini-
tion and development in his 'free
structure'. The Sculthorpe work
was much more solid in musical

Innovative sounds
out of Australia

substance and direction. It pos-
sessed many of the same uncom-
mon characteristics as the Wer-
derwork but also incorporated a
fascinating influence of tradi-
tional Asian folk music in melan-
choly, ritualistic moods and pri-
mitive rhythmic chopping..
The evening's high point was
the performance of a bitter el-
egy on the ravages of war (par-
ticularly World War II) by the
Dmitri Shostakovich. The work's
mood was one rarely is ever
achieved in music; a tragic pall
of despair mixed with the sound
and the fury of a world gone
mad. The ensemble's depth and
diversity of expression was un-
canny in passages of weeping
voices, howling wind, and sinis-
ter, somber dissonances. Out of
all this almost unbearable horror
arises still more - a brusque,
demoniacal dance.
It wasn't hard to imaginea
Bergmanesque personification
of Death laughing hideously and
dancing triumphantly over his
spoils. It is indeed an injustice
for this masterpiece to suffer ob-
scurity. After this emotional in-
tensity, the Mozart work was re-
duced to nothing save a frus-
trating disappointment, both in
mood and quality of perform-
ance. Its mood was strange and
out of place with the rest of the
program.
Worse still, there was none of
the conviction nor as much sen-
sitivity in its rendition as in the
other works. At first glance, I
suspected that the Mozart work
was included on the program as
either a sweetening for those
who could not swallow a serving
of only little-known modern
works or as some insurance for
a sizeable attendance. I can-
not say whether it was wholly
responsible for the latter (al-
though I doubt it), but the en-
semble's inferior "laissez-faire"
performance of the Mozart all
but ruined the effect of their
marvellous renditions of the
modern works earlier in the pro-
gram. It lacked the richness,
clarity, and throbbing expres-
sion of other interpretations. The
Austral Quartet would do far
more justice to its formidable
powers to stick with its forte -
modern music I- rather than the
token traditional favorites.
sist Tom Fowler keep the band
going with intelligent playing
and interesting rhythmic devia-
tions. Fred Webb on organ, and
on one cut electric piano, al-
ways keeps the music contained
within limits with surging organ
lines and some good soloing. Gre-
gory plays some funky rhythms
which he once in awhile has a
tendency to overuse, but they us-
ually fit in well and give the mu-
sic an added dimension in terms
of variance. His leads always
fit the tone and mood of the
song, and his range is wide as
he plays some tough rock lines
to some improvisatory jazz-rock
lines. Laflamme is one of the
best violinists per se in rock. He
keeps the violin in its proper
place, using it as an interesting
counterpoint to the guitar where
they take turns trading off on the
melody line of some song. When
he solos, his violin remains the
gentle lyrical instrument it was
meant to be, his solos always fit
the pattern of the song.

Daily Photo by DAVID MARGOLICK
A scene from the performance of Lorca's The House of Bernarda
Alba presented earlier this year by the Residential College Players.

XEROX
4c a copy
3c EACH FOR 11 TO 50 COPIES
2c EACH FOR 50 OR MORE
lc EXTRA ON 100% RAG BOND
five machines available
ALSO THE SUPER XEROX 7000 CAN REDUCE
FROM 14 X 18 TO ANY SIZE YOU MAY NEED
AT YOUR UNIVERSITY CELLAR
12-5 SUN./9 A.M.-10 P.M. WEEKDAYS 9-5 SAT.

.......

.....

7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Circus?
7 Half the George Kirby Comedy
Hour
9 Irish Rovers
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Behind the Lines
8:00 2 Jose Feliciano
7 Mod Squad
9 Billy Graham Crusade
56 Advocates
50 Pro Hockey
9:00 2 Movie
"The African Queen."
4 Ironside
7 Assignment: Vienna
9 News
56 International Performance
9:30 9 Amazing World of Kreskin
10:00 4 Dean Martin
7 Gwen Marshall
9 This Land
56 Masterpiece Theatre
10:30 9 Countrytime
50 Wrestling
11:00 4 7 9 News
50 Golddiggers
11:10 2 News
11:20 9 News
11:30 4 Johnny Carson
7 Truman Capote Behind
Prison Walls
50 To Be Announced
11:40 2 Movie
"The Fighting Lady" (1944)
12:00 9 Movie
"The Storyof Dr. Wassenl."
(1944)
1:00 4 News
7 San Quentin
1:30 7 Blue Angels
1:40 2 Movie
"Blondie's Lucky Day" (1946)
2:00 7 News
3:10 2 News
AA CIVIC THEATRE
AUDITIONS
FOR
"THIEVE'S CARNIVAL"
DEC. 5, 6, 7
7:30 P.M.
AACT BLDG.-
201 West Mulholland
(off W. Washington)
ROLES: 5 women, 9 men

DIAL: 5-6290
THE TLTMATE EXPERIENCE
FO EVERYOE!
"DISNEY'SGREATPIONEERING VENTURE/S
THE SEASON'S H/T REVVAl" "eac k
"AN INCREDIBLY REVOLUTIONARY FILM...
THE MIND CAN RUN RIOT!" m.ONYU iTxkw.
"FAR MEAD OF ITS TIME...BEST AUDO-VISUAL
EXhRIENCE iN TOWN I" WiIniam Woo, Cue
"BEST FAMILY FILMI" J,..paG J.s, d.v
"A rOTAL EXPERIENCE IN SIGHT, SOUND
AND COLOR... MAKE FANTASIA A MUST!"
SHOWS AT
1-3-5-7-9

A Beautiful Day

By HARRY HAMMITT
One of the foremost bands in
the San Francisco area for the
past few years has been a rela-
tivelv obscure band called It's A
Beautiful Day. With a name like
that, it's hard to go wrong, and
the band has made quite a re-
putation for itself.
Led by violinist D a v i d
Laflamme, the band has picked
up some influences from other
San Francisco groups, most not-
ably the Jefferson Airplane. As
most bands do these days, this
band has released a live record-
ing done at the once sacred Car-
negie Hall. The album's title ex-
presses the situation quite suc-
cinctly, it's called It's A Beau-
tiful Day at Carnegie Hall (Col-
umbia KC 31338).
The band relies on a relatively
s i m p 1 e scheme. There is
bass, drums, guitar, and key-
boards plus Laflamme's violin.
Relying on this simplicity, the
band has fused together a brand
of driving, but soothing rock that
never drags, and often hits some
rather nice spots.
It seems to be a time honored
practice in the rock world today
to cut a live album, but there is
often no apparent reason for a
live recording since the band
doesn't sound particularly differ-
ent live than in the studio. This
may be partly the case with It's
A Beautiful Day, but more than
anything else, this recording
gives the band a chance to lay
back and stretch out. The offer-
ings contain some new material,
but also contain a good num-
ber of old group standards.
The older. material is that
which gets the extended treat-
ment on this album with the
average one being about eight
minutes in length. The older
songs lend themselves well to
an extended version, Laflamme
and guitarist B i 1 1 Gregory
emerge as the chief soloists. All
the songs are fairly simple in
their construction, generally con-
sisting of a pretty simple riff or
series of riffs over which the
members solo or over which the

r a live LP
lyrics are sung.
In the vocals, the influence of
the Jefferson Airplane comes
through most obviously. Lead vo-
cals are generally handled by
Laflamme and Pattie Santos who
are both fine singers on their
own, but when they sing in har-
mony, they create a pattern that
is everybit as fine as anything
Grace Slick and Marty Baln
ever did.
The band escapes the often
levelled criticism of rock bands
in general of being overly clut-
tered. The musicians play well
together and when one takes a
solo, the others maintain their
ground. The rhythm section of
drummer Van Fuentes, and bas-

CULURECALEINDAR'
MUSIC-The School of Music presents a Student Piano Re-
cital at 12:30 this afternoon in the SM Recital Hall. The
School of Music's U Jazz Band, Edward Smith, conductor,
performs in Rackham Aud. tonight at 8.
DRAMA-U Players present Jellicoe's The Knack in Mendels-
sohn at 8 tonight. Student Lab Theatre performs Original
One Acts in Frieze Arena at 4:10 this afternoon.
FILM-Cinema Guild presents the first of three silent films
this weekend, with live piano accompaniament by Donald
Sosin at the 7 p.m. showings. Tonight-Griffith's Way
Down East at 7 and 9:05 in Arch. Aud. Staff says:
A superb melodrama with Lillian Gish cast out of polite
society after she has an illegitimate child. Famous escape
on the ice.
The AA Film Co-op shows Truffaut's Jules and Jim in
Aud. A at 7 and 9:30. Daily reviewer Jeff Epstein com-
ments:
Jules (Oskar Werner) and Jim (Henri Serre) are dandies
circa 1910, who share everything including a warm, lasting
friendship. Then they meet Catherine (Jeanne Moreau).
She becomes the focal point of both their lives, each man
appealing to a certain nature of Catherine's personality,
as Truffaut examines the complexities of the triangular
relationship.
Collective Eye screens Pontecorvo's Burn tonight at 7:30
in the MLB.

We H ave
a Wide

THIS COMING SATURDAY NIGHT!
Aliman Brothers Band
IN CONCERT-SAT., DEC. 9

Selection of
Pierced
Earrings
from $5.00 ,

I

__ .. _

JEANNE MOREAU, OSKAR WERNER, AND HENRI SERRE
IN FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT'S

JULES

A

D

J

(FRENCH DIALOGUE-ENGLISH SUBTITLES)
The film evokes the romantic nostalgia before World War I, telling the story of a friendship between
Jules, who is German, and Jim, rho is French, and their twenty-year I a v e for the same woman,
Kathe, a modern woman.
NOTE: This is a rare opportunity to see this film in the original 35mm Cinemascope format, which

I m_ r'n I~u r .Anne cfTC 1

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