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November 18, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-18

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Saturday, November 18, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

3020 Wastenaw Dal 434-1782
NIGHTLY AT 7:30
In new screen splendor..
Thc most nianiticent
picture ever!
S ocnrAGRTICRS

IBowie: Winding down tour,
churning out releases

Winner
CLARK (Ai$LE f en
VIVIEN LEIGH A"admy
LESLIE I IO'iRD
OLiVIAd(IeI AVI AND

Join The

Daily

Staff

LAST PERFORMANCE Thnte at 0 P.M-.
the University Players production of
BERTOLT BRECHT'S
MOTHER COURAGE
and Her Children
adapted and translated by
ERIC BENTLEY
BOX OFFICE OPEN
NOVEMBER 15-18 12:30-8:00 P.M.
POWER CENTER BOX (crti time
IND. TICKETS $3, $2 763-3333
Department of Speech Communication and Theatre

.(Continued from Page 2)
survives this barrage of Viscon-
tian aluminum though, and his
success is one of listener's sanis-
faction as well.
eLeadirns of with a close-to-th-
Width of a Circle, the album
proceeds through several varying
songs concerning a prophetized
view of a domed society. Re-
mote, and oftentimes defiantly
so; the songs are best defined on
the listener's own level.
"All the Madmen" and "After
All" complement this view with
their stylized insanity. "After
All" features a macabre Moog-
laced instrumental break t h a t1
sounds like its very own carni-
val of death. The instruments
heave and then collapse, causing
a breathless feeling and an even
mrespaianf ull-nique spineting-
songs in his direct, all-powerful
sounding voice, ending on a eer-
i shrill but netheles perfect
Guy arawan s
Taught & Influenced
Michael Cooney, Bob
White, Rosalie Sorrels,
Pam Ostergren, etc.'
He co-wrote "WVe Shall
,,
Overcome.

"Running Gun Blues" is sung
mockihigly, but its tale of death-
I slash them cold, I kill them
dead
I broke the gooks, I cracked
their heads '
I'll bomb them out from under
their beds
But now I've got the running
gun blues
is anything but the tone of its
performance. The thriving sound
of "Runining Gun Blues" coi-
tinues on through "Saviour Ma-
chine," a song about a ma-
chine that has a mind of irts own
and is worshipping people who
have none. "Saviour Machine"~ is
provokingly dangerous but more-
over it is a well-drawn conclusion
of the times at hand: Bowie plays
upon and provokes the listener's
deepest fears.
S"She Shook Me Cold" and
"Black Country Rock" are both
straightforward rockers, w i t h

"She" - the story of a seem-
ingly unsuccessful rape - t h e
most interesting lyrically. Tiye
title song is a stately, fuzzily.
electric piece and the conclud-
ing number, "The Supermen,"
announces the sad existence of
the super being; of "wondrous
beings chained to life,,. . . so
softy a supergod cries.
On its musical mierit alone,
M.W.S.T.W. is light years ahead
of Space Oddity, and extremely
comparable to most, if not all,
rock products on the current
sucidal outburstsrowaly moe and
more maniacally potent, and, as
such, the artist maintains an un-
matchable level of crisp severity
and spontaneity. The Man Who
Sold the World (previously re-
leased in 1970) is far from a per-
fect album, but its strong musi-
cal and lyrical sense makes it
an album quite definitely ahead
of its time. Quite.

West, Bruce and Laing; Not
quite 'cream,'but satisfying
By HERB BOWIE "Turn Me Over" is plenty catchy, its members are decent vocalists,
If you're still looking for a and the rest of the tunes, includ- and they avail themselves of
surrogate Cream, then West, ing Eddies Boyd's "Third De- this resource. More important,
Bruce & Laing is bound to be gree," provide comfortable start- though, is the group's variety of
disappointing. Leslie West and ing points for the band's per- styles.
Corky Laing are both good, but formances. Although the band's staple is
they can't begin to fill their pre- Instrumentally, Bruce is defi- hard rock, it varies the pace
decessor's shoes., nitely the group's mainstay. As often enough to prevent their
Although West tried to play the well as turning in competent basic style from becoming Iwear-
role of guitar virtuoso in Moun- keyboard performances, he plays some. "Out Into the Fields,"
tamn, his liimted musical imagina- exciting lead bass throughout "While You Sleep," and "Pollu-
tion makes him more suited to nearly the entire album, impro- tion Woman" are softer numbers,
playing rhythm and a limited vising much more freely than and "Third Degree" is the sort
amount of lead guitar. Laing has he did in Cream's studio work, of "progressive" b 1u e s that
never tried to play Ginger Baker, The sturdy backbone provided Cream played, particularly remi-
Ifdon thed othser hnd, you're by Laing's solid, steady drum- W orld "Sitn nTp h
just looking for some good, en- ming and West's powerful rhythm
ergetic rock, Why Dontcha (Co- guitar-work allow Bruce to pull Given the half-life of most
lumbia KC 31929) should be this difficult trick off without a supergroups today, it's not like-
pretty satisfying. The album's hitch. The result is some of the ly that West, Bruce & Laing will
got a lot of things going for it: most driving, imaginative bass remain together very Ion. They
good compositions, spirited per- playing to be heard anywhere in may even break up by the time
formances, a minimum of self- rock today. West and Laing, you read this-which would be
indulgence, and variety, while playing subordinate roles, too bad, becautse they show
It's hard to tell who was re- deserve credit for their restraint, promise of becoming one of the
sponsible for most of the song- Teprl ntuetlps- bs-acems
besael reditedtheetr aes aebrif and boh us- gup arund h Dontchais
group plus various collaborators, cians play tastefully if not bril- certainly the best thing Bruce
but t nsemssaf t ettha liantly. has done since the demise of
"Pollution Woman" is just beau- What makes this album the Cream, and probably the best
tiful, combining the grace and little gem it is, though, is the thing West and Laing have ever
power of Bruce's best efforts. group's versatility. All three of done.

DIAL

665-6290
"Breathtakingly Beautiful"

CULTJRE Cr\-. EI'Wr~
ART-Pyramid gallery sets the scene tonight at 6 for a multi-
media presentation of performances, happenings and
conceptual art pieces as valid art forms; Bachelor of Fine
Arts show on exhibit at the Union Gallery today from
12-5.
FILMS-Cinema Guild shows Lubitsch's Ninotchika tonight at
'7, 9:05, Arch. Aud.; Cinema II shows Busby Berkley's
Gold Diggers of 1935 tonight at 7, 9, Aud. A; India Stu-
dent Association shows Jeevan Mrityu tonight at 7, As-
tron. Aud.
DRAMA-University Players present Brecht's Mother Cour -
age tonight at 8, Power Center.
MUSIC-University Musical Society presents Paniagua Quar-
tet from Spain tonight at 8:30, Rackham aud.; Ark fea-
tures Ed Trickett and Guy Carawan tonight at 9; Peo-
ples Ballroom features Rio Smokers tonight; School of
Music presents operas Puccini's Sister Angelica and
Ibert's Angelique tonight at 8, Mendelssohn and Maggie
Speier, viola this afternoon at 2:30, SM Recital Hall.
WEEKEND BARS AND MUSIC-Bimbo's, Gaslighters (Fri.,
Sat., Sun.) cover; Del Rio, Armando's Jazz Group (Sun.)
no cover; Rubaiyat, Iris Bell Adventure (Fri., Sat. Sun.)
no cover; Pretzel Bell, RFD Boys (Fri., Sat.) cover; Blind
Pig, Carey Bell (F'ri., Sat.) cover, Classical music (Sun.)
no cover; Golden Falcon, Wooden Glass (Fri., Sat.) cover
Mackinac Jack's, Ramblecrowe (Fri., Sat.) cover, Okra
(Sun.) cover; Mr. Flood's Party, Terry Tate (Fri., Sat.)
cover; Odyssey, Mack Truck (Fri., Sat.) cover; Bimbo's on
the Hill, Cardboard, (Fri., Sat.) cover.
Noise for
W es tern DawnTe

SAT. & SUN,
MATINEES

''MAGIC XMAS TREE"

Only
at 1 & 3

One Day Only-SATURDAY-Double Feature-SATURDAY-One Day Qonly

TH E FILM SELECTED TO OPEN TH E
NEW YORK WOMEN'S FILM FESTIVAL

the incredible
Maria Callas
OS
MEDIA
directed by
P'''er Pa1ol Pasoli n i

By GLORIA JANE SMITH
Arts Editor
In the lobby outside of the Un-
ion Ballroom Thursday eve-
ning, a group of dancers garbed
in quasi-translucent white went
through expressive motions -
whetting the appetites of all those
who waited to enter the Ball-
room and experience Noise for
Western Dawn, a multi-media
event presented by Bodylens.
It is rare that we are offered
the opportunity to experience
aesthetically innovative events on
this campus - much less produc-
ed by students. Noise for Wes-
tern Dawn was indeed a breath
of fresh air in a student com-
munity too often confined to
"academic" pursuit in the arts.
There was definitely at least
a para-professional air to the en-
tire program, which utilized four
large screens with slide, film and
video projection.
Following a Sagian "entrada,"
we witnessed "Songs in Space"

with visuals and sound by Bill
Lillvis and Jerry Gazda. This
portion of the program featured
Lillvis' poetry which concerned
itself with hollowness and was
complimented by well-executed
slides of the human body accent-
ed by mellow red lighting.
We were then swept into t h e
poetic mind of James Peters who
explored linear, concrete a n d
sound poetry, climaxing his pre-
sentation with an integration of
concepts utilizing dance, slides',
and video: Noise for Western
Dawn.
Although I do have my criti-
cisms of the evening -- its pace
was at times too slow, its dura-
tion of two hours perhaps t o o
long, its approach at times too
scholarly (at the expense of en-
tertainment), its impact at times
too overpowering (often hiting us
with just too much information
at once) - its intent was defin-
itely carried through in a suc-
cessful fashion.

By VERNON SCOTT
Hollywood (UPI) - A group of
highly qualified film producers
and critics nominated the 50
most significant movies in Amer-
ica cinema history and conclud-
ed the two most important were
Ctzen Kane and Gone With the
The group was selected by
University of Southern Califor-
nia's Performing Arts Council,
which asked the panel to choose
milestone pictures - those
which gave new concepts and
advanced the art and technique
of filmnmaking-.
Responses were mostly pre-
dictable as the professional
movie makers came up with a
total of 53 landmark films.
Few "Greats" are recent.
Perhaps, this indicates a decline
in movie quality since only a
handful of the 53 all-time great
movies selected were filmed in
the past decade.
An interesting footnote is that
of those nine recent pictures
only Dustin Hoffman among the
stars appeared in more than
one of the elite - "Midnight
Cowboy" and"The Graduate."
wihTeBirth of a Nation, h
Gold Rush, Greed, Intolerance,
ThtGreat Train Robbery, Cit
and Nanook of the North.
Another quirk is the appear-
ance of Ben Hur twice on the
list - the original in 1925 with
Ramon Navarro and the 1959
film with Charlton Heston.
A glaring oversight was the
omission of "The Oxbow Inci-
dent,"perhaps the most trend-
seting radical western ever
filmed.
How would your personal
choices rate with the 53 films
ranked in order of votes they
received:
1 -- Citizen Kane, Gone With
the Wind.
2 - The Birth of a Nation.
3 - All Quiet on the Western
Front.
4 -- The Best Years of Our
Lives, Midnight Cowboy, Stage-
coach.
S - High Noon, On The Water-
front.
Hpet an msic.or
orts writingatr
arts: Contact Arts
Edai to r. c/o The
drama, dance, fim,

6 - 2001: A SpaceAdyssey.
7 - The Treasure of Sierra
Madre.
8 -- The Jazz Singer, The In-
forerWest tSide Story, The
9 - The Gold Rush, It Happen-
ed One Night.
10 - The Big Parade, Casa-
11ca F-n Gred Itolerance, King
Kong.
12 - The Great Train Robbery,
Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,
Sunset Boulevard, The Wizard of
Oz, The Graduate.
13 - Nanook of the North,
Little Caesar, The Bridge on the
River Kwai, The Sound of
Music.
14 - City Lights, Ben Hur
1925, Forty Second Street, The
Maltese Falcon, Public Enemy,
Dr. Stangelove.
1S - Ben Hur 1959, A Streetcar

ARTS

Named Desire, An American in
Paris, The Robe, I Am a Fugi-
tive from a Chain Gang, The
L o s t Weekend, Easy Rider,
16 -CovereldeWagon, S n 0 W
White and the Seven Dwarfs,
The 39 Steps, The General,
Shane The Godfather, Lost Hori-
Tonhe purpose of the poll was to
gather materials on each of the
films and make them available
for students of the arts and for
special public exhibitions.
Although many of the films
antedated the Academy Awards,
only 13 of the movies in the
group were Oscar winners.
Such award - winning pictures
as Grand Hotel, Mrs. Miniver,
Gentlemen's Agreement, From
Here to Eternity, Marty, Law-
rence of Arabia, Tom Jones and
Patton were passed over.

q
More ARTS today on Page 2
Local women
exhibit art works

Mai Zetterling's
"The Grls"
STARRING:
Harriet Anderson, N a k e d Light &
Mon ika Persona Bibi Anderson, The .
Magician The Silence-Virgin Spring,
Gunnel Lindbloom

"Full of eccentric imagination
arnd real passion . . . superb."
--N.Y. Tirmes
this important film program will be shown
-ONE DAY ONLY-
SAT U RDAY, NOV. 18
modern languages auditoriums 3 & 4
complete shows 6:30-7-8:20-8:40

$1.50 cont.

Friends of Newsreel

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS
the ailman brothers band
* K
16

* * CIN EMA I I PR ESE NTS: * *
SATURDAY 18 NOVEMBER
Goiddiggers of 1935
BUSBY BERKELEY. With Dick Powell, Gloria Stuart, Adoiphe
Menjou. Hundreds of dancing feet! "The rmaster of scenic pres-
tidigitation .. in one of his happiest moods."--N.Y. Times
SUNDAY: GOLDDIGGERS OF 1935 AT 7:00
LA DOLCE VITA AT 9:00

By ANN DI LORETO
Ann Arbor women, joined
in the pursuit of their artistic
interests are currently exhibit-.
ing another successful bollec-
tion of watercolors, prints and
3-dimensional construction at the
Rackham gallery.
This 21st annual showing fea-
tures color and vibrance that of-
fers a refreshing change from
the bleak grey that has settled
since that infamous Tuesday.
The artists ranging from stu-
dents to senior citizens also
have yearly showings at the Un-
dergraduate Library and North
Campus Commons.
The artists are neither ama-
teur, nor do they expect amateur
prices. Three works have been
of which is "Circus Backstage,"
a fine print by Sheri Emley.
Five others were also awarded
"Special Mention," including an
unfortunate attempt at a modern
interpretation of a vase and

flowers, "Harvest II." Another
obnoxiously shocking work entit-
led "Hot Poppies" fails in its at-
tempt at originality, coming
across as merely another Hall-
mark Greeting Card. This blatent
insensitivity on the part of the
jury causes the gallery's only
flaw, its inconsistency of qual-
ity.
The success of the show is par-
tially in debt to three original
works by Nancy Wilkoff entitled
"No. 178," "Ms. Ellery," and
No. 181," each of which desersv-
ed a separate "Special Mention."
No. 178 an entirely white sculp-
ture constructed of, among other
paraphernalia, empty birth con-
trol dispensers, expressing the
ceremonial and peaceable plight
The;colorful and vivid expres-
sions of nature, growth and life
reveal these Ann Arbor women's
efforts in cooperative organiza-
tion since 1951.
The women of Ann Arbor
should be congratulated for
their offering of one of the few
free diversions in our city with
surprising freshness. Until 5 pm
today they will be giving their
affiration of life, something a
bit rare in this cold, cloudy city
lately.

4 erformances Dec.2 and 3

AUDITORIUM A

7 AND 9 O'CLOCK

$1.00

DANCING

* RAMBLE-
CROWE

8 P.M.-2 A.M. EVERY NIGHT

r~r~ A r-r' rr'~ -- J F~I 77 A I

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