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November 12, 1972 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-12

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Sunday, November 12, 1972'

Pace Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Indians divided on
protests at bureau

WASHINGTON (AP) - Militant
Indians who occupied the Bu-
reau of Indian Affairs (BIA) left
damages estimated at $1.98 mil-
lion gnd stirred bickering among
other Indians on how to deal
with the protesters.
The Interior Department said
Friday that when the Indians
ended their seven-day seizure of
the building theytook or damaged
som 600 to 700 painting alued
valued at about $150,000.
In addition, the government
estimated, it will cost $700,000 to
restore 7,000 cubic feet of des-
stroyed or stolen records, $250,- '
000 to repair damage to the
building, and $280,000 to replace
furniture and office machinery.
While two Indian groups did
not condone the damage to the
BIA, they differed on what should
be done in the wake of the pro-
test-.
The National Congress of
American Indians (NCAI), cre-
ated in 1944 and the oldest and
largest national Indian group,
called for a wholesale re-evalu-
atio tsofthesBIA in line with the
The National Tribal Chairmen's
Association, which was created
in 1971 with the encouragement
of BIA Commissioner Louis
Bruce, said that demonstrators
should be prosecuted. BIA and
Interior officials responsible for
failing to protect the building
should be fired, said the NCAI.
The association called for full
prosecution of the "dissident, ur-
ban - oriented Indians who took

AP Photo
Civilias flee
-South Vietnamese civilians carry their few prec ious possessions as they flee the hamlet of So Sao,
north of Saigon, recently. They left their homes following infiltration of the area by North Vietnamese
toops.
ARAB GROUP IMPLICA TED:
Thr'ee letter'-bombDs found in
London; one 1ijured in blast

from the Labor and Transporta-
tion Departments and the Office
of Economic Opportunity-to the
Indians as they left the build-
ing Wednesday to assure their
having a means of returning
home, said Charles Trimble of
the NCAI.
NCAI was critical of govern-
ment officials who, Trimble
said, refused to cooperate with
the Indian caravan and planned
repressive retaliations against
the building occupiers even while
White House negotiators work-
ed to meet protesters' demands.
Several questions about the in-
cident remain to be answered in
the months ahead:
--Who led the ransacking of
BIA files, pillaging of valuable
art and rampant damaging of
property? To what extent will
they be held accountable?
-Will the demonstrating In-
dians be received back on the
reservations and in their urban
settings as martyred heroes, as
some of the Indians claim? Or
will they be outcasts who' don't
represent anybody anamaged
House envisions?
-Why did the White HIous
promise the Indians amnesty
from prosecution for occupying
the building but not from punish-
ment for damaging it or for
theft? With what authority did
it make available $66,650 in cash
to speed the Indians' back home?
"MANY FA NT A ST IC DE-
LIGHTS .. . ''SEX" IS A VERY
FUNNY MOVIE."
-Glatzner, Michigan Doily
"MAD GENIUS RAMPANT."
-N.Y. Magazine
ab
--Aso-- R
"Alice" at 1 pm. 4:15, 7.25
Sex' at 2:45, 6 p.m., 9:15
DIAL 668-6416

Cinemia Guiildi
FESTIVAL OF
FILMS ON WOMEN
SUNDAY
A DAM'S R IB
Dir, Geog Cukor 1949
Screenplay by HAROLD P INTER
An earlier era's view of the
"woman's problem." Katherine
Hepburn as the defense lawyer
& Spencer Tracy as prosecu-
tor. Hepburn's enthusiasm for
her career threatens her mar-
riage.
MONDAY
Th Pumpkin
Eater
Dir. Jack Clayton, 1964
Peter, eter dPum pkineater Had
He put her in a pumnpkin Shell
And there he kept her very Well.
Anne Banrofrtdas , woman who
down when she has a hysterec-
tomy to please he.r husband. An
interesting ''sleeper.

.ifM
with SECT ION
Danny Kortchmar-Russ Kunkle
Craig Doerge-Leard~ Skiar

NOVEMBER 11
FRIDAY 8 P.M.
$3.50 $4.50 $5.50
crisler arena
MA NY GOOD SEAT.S
BUT GOING FAST
Reserve your seats
today at Michigan
Union. (You'll re-
ceive a receipt-cou-
pan which you ex-
change for a ticket
when t h e y arrive
Tues., Nov. 14.)
The Ailman Bros.
a nd D R. JOH N
$4.00 Gen. Admission

By Reuters
Three more letter-bombs were
found in London yesterday as po- I
lice and post office workers made
a city-wide search for murder-by-
post devices.
Police were checking further re-
ports of suspicious looking let-
ters and repeated their urgent
warning to the public, especially I
Jews and Jewish firms, not to
open mail they cannot identify.
Twelve explosive -packed let-
ters mailed in India turned up in
1 -.

controi 01 the BIA buildngs.
London Friday. One exploded as letter-bomb shown on a television The NCAI distributed $66,650--
it was opened by a director of a news program last night, and call- ________________
large diamond company, Vivian ed his Jewish employer. Authori- IThe Mcia aleie n a-
Prins, burning his hands, face, ties were notified this morning, aged by students at the University of
chest and thighs. A police spokesperson said most Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
The others were rendered harm- of the letter-bombs were addressed alass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
less by explosives experts. to Jews or Jewish firms, but there Mhigan 404.aynardSred dAnny Arbor.
The third letter-bomb found yes- was some difficulty establishing a day through Sunday morning Univer-
terday was opened at an office Jewish connection in a few cases. sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
Friday, but failed to explode and At least one of the letters inter- care campus area);$>1;1n localamail
was set aside by an employe who cepted Friday contained a mes- (Other states and foreign).
did not recognize it for what it sage saying it was from Black Summer Session published Tuesday
Polic s i th wo k r aw a Septem ber, the Arab guerrilla or- ion rtesa: $5.0y arri er (c ubs
Polie sad th worer sw aganization responsible for the area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Munich massacre of 11 Israeli Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
1 Olympic team members. states and foreign).

P'roluetion spe&1-ups
set of U Wstrikes
By United Press Iatftnatioual .salaried workers in AMC's styling
General Motors and American section. The strike began Sept. 8
Motors - the largest and smallest when negotiations failed to pro-
of the major U. S. auto companies duce a contract.
-were involved yesterday in labor AMC plants that would be af-
disputes with the United Auto, fected by a strike are in Lan-

Workers (UAW).
GM's Assembly Division (GMA-
D)plant atae Wlion, d De., wa
workers remained off the job. It
was the 11th strike called by the
UAW against various GM plants
in less than one month against I
what it contends are unfair work |
speedups. I
A scheduled strike by 2,000 work-
ers at the GM central foundry at
Danville, Ill., was postponed in.-
definitely following a 30-hour bar-,
gaining session which resulted in i
"good progress" toward settling
work standards disputes.
GM has been making up pro-
duction losses by scheduling Sat-.
urday overtime - this week at
eight assembly plants, including
two which were shut down for two
days in the previous weekend's
walkouts.
At American Motors, the union
threatened a strike against the
entire company in- support of a,
nine-week-old strike by 26 mod-
elers and designers at AMC's head-
quarters in Detroit.
A companywide strike could call
22,000 workers off the job at a
time when the company is at-
tempting to increase production to
meet the consumer demand for its
cars.
The 26 workers are members of
UJAW Local 412 which last year
won the right to represent the

sing, Mich.; Milwaukee and Ke-
no, s; ISouth Bend pand In-
Stratford, Ont.; and Toledo, Ohio.
At GM, which has been plagued
by the UAW's mini-strikes in each.
of the past four weekends, UAW
strategists have selected five
plants as targets for next week-
end - affecting 24,200 workers.
The short strikes, which shut
down plants and interrupt produc-
tion for two or three days, cost
the union nothing because strike
benefits are not paid until a walk-
out begins its second week.
Plants slated for walkouts next
Friday if progress is not made are
GMAD plants at Arlington, Texas;
Janesville, Wis.; and Lakewood,
Ga. - all three involved in ear-
lier walkouts in October - and at
the Delco-Moraine plant at Day-
ton, Ohio, and Fisher Body Plant
No. 1 at Flint, Mich.

The British section of the World
Jewish Congress was opening its
national conference in London last
night and amidst heavy police se-
curity.
A conference spokesperson said
there would be a strict check on'
credentials before admission to
the meeting, but did not expect
any difficulties.
lMeanwhile, Indian postal author-
ities have asked for metal detec-
tors to track down letter-bombs.
installed ast teSaajung air sort-
ingc ofce, India's biggest sorin
said. d
At least two packets addressed
to the United States and Israel
were sent for examinations from
the Safdarjung office yesterday.
Postal authorities, working in co-
operation with explosive experts,
have so far tracked down 42 let-
ter-bombs in Bombay and eight in
Delhi.
and
MONDAY
S OKRA )
2SASH 2PI--2A v

* *******!*!*!*!*****

THE UNION GALLERY
PRESENTS
Betsy Beckern
Lois Kiafter

Architecture Auditorium TICKETS on sale NOW-Michigan Union, 1 1-5 :30, Sat. 1-4
p.m. Salvation Records 10-8 Mon.-Sat. Or by MAIL ORDER
7&9 p.m. 75c ~* (Allman Bros. only) UAC DAYSTAR, P.O. BOX 381, ANN
pARBOR, 481071
to an aUthor's part tome
* ELLN FRAKFOR
~~ .7
6.
6.
"VAGIAL PO T C.
+ - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - --.
& 3 00-5:30 .M.-onday, oveber 'X
316so s .es

4

and
Boniie Lawrence
PLAYING TRADITIONAL
AMERICAN FOLK MUSIC
SUNDAY EVENING -8 -10 p.mi.

Oc

Cider and Donuts

Creative Arts Festival
MAS MEETIN
committees include:
Fil, usic Art,
Danlce, & Publicity

ln-Residence Staff Application
Forms for 1973-74 Academic Year
Available Starting November 21, 1972
in Ms. Clharlene Coady's Office
3011 S.A.B.
F ROM 8:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M. & 1:30 P.M .-5 :00 P.M.
MOND AY-F RID AY
POSITIONS INCLUDE- RESIDENT DIRECTOR, ASSISTANT
RESIDENT DIRECTOR, RESIDENT
ADVISOR, RESIDENT FELLOW &
HEAD LIBRARIAN

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