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November 04, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-11-04

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.' I

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

saturday, November 4, 1972

...........................................~.......

,

400 Indians hold DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN,
The Daily Official Bulletin is an l Constituencies in Higher Education,"
official publication of the Univer- Rackham, 10 am,-Noon. M
sity of Michigan. Notices should be IProfessional Theater Prog.: Moliere's

Inu_

By the AP and Reuters
WASHINGTON )-Protesting
Indians inside the Bureau of In-
dian Affairs (BIA) building bar-
ricaded the doors late yesterday
for a second night to dramatize
their demands.
An aide to Louis Bruce, BIA
commissioner, said Bruce and a
handful of other top aides would
remain in the building with the
demonstrators.
The barricading began shortly
before 6 p.m. EST, and there was
no reliable estimate then of how
many Indians were inside t h e
building.
The Indians were part of a
larger group of several hundred
from as many as 250 tribes who
arrived in Washington Thursday
to participate in a series of de-
monstrations to dramatize what
they say is their fight for sur-
vival in white America.

The demonstrations, due to last
a week, were called "The Trail
of Broken Treaties."
The Indians demanded the re-
signation of Harrison Loesch, As-
sistant Secretary of the Interior,
who has jurisdiction over In-
dian Affairs, and of John Crow,
Deputy Commissioner of Indian
Affairs.
The protesters asked that
these people be replaced by In-
dians.
As commissioner, Bruce s a i d
that he had limited authority to
negotiate with the group. But he
promised to stay with the Ind-
ians in the building until other
government officials listen to
their demands.
The Indians had planned to
hold the services at the gravesite
of Ira Hayes, a Pima Indian who
helped raise the American flag
at Iwo Jima.

sent in TYPEWRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.

"Don Juan", Power Center, 3, 8 pm.
School of Music: B. Shafran, piano,
SM Recital Hall, 8 pm.
. Residential College Players: Lorca's
'.the House of Bernarda Alba," RC
Coil. Mud., 8 pm.
Musical Society: Royal Philharmonic
Orchestra, Rudolf Kempe, conductor,
Hill Aud., 8:30 pmn.
Hockey: Michigan vs N. Dakota, Coli-
seum, 8 pm.

i

vRADIOKING
AND Hr
217SASH ija.LuK 2PR-2AM
"MANY FANTASTIC DE-
LIGHTS... "SEX' IS A VERY
FUNNY MOVIE"
-Glatzner, Michigan Daily
"MAD GENIUS RAMPANT."
-N.Y. Magazine

Vote
ARMSTRONG
For
County Clerk

McGOVERN
PRECINCT
DELEGATE
*,ACTIVE IN
CPHA STRIKE
PROVIDED CAMPUS
McGOVERN
HEADQUARTERS

SATURDAY
DAY CALENDAR

This UNPRD

Y, NOVEMBER 4

DUKE ARMSTRONG-DEMOCRAT for County Clerk
Pd. Pol. Adv.

1.

Education School: Saturday Seminars, ORGANIZATIONAL NOTICES
"Institutional Structures for New U of M Volleyball Club meeting dur-
ing practice at the I. M. Bldg., Nov. 7,
7:30 PM or Nov. 9. 5:30 PM.

I

The Michigan Daily, didted and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 byI
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio): $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (otherj
states and foreign).

i .- -- - -1-1. -, -.-- -.-.

/ /
r

UAC-DAYSTAR presents
anies taylor
FRI.,NOV. 17 CRISLER $3.50, $4.50, $5.50
HOW TO GET YOUR RESERVED SEATS NOW:
The tickets have been delayed at the printers and
will not be arriving for a while, BUT . . .
You can reserve the seats you want now. Starting
Wednesday, Nov. 1 st you can go to the ticket coun-
ter in the Michigan Union and select and pay for
your seats. (Mon-Fri 11 am-6 pm, Sat. 1-4 pm)
You will receive a bona fide receipt-coupon which
you exchange for your real-live ticket when they
arrive. Sorry, no personal checks.
OR, if you want to send a mail order, send a cash-
ier or certified check, or money order only to UAC-
Daystar, P.O. Box 381, Ann Arbor 48107. Be sure
to enclose a stamped self-addressed envelope. Box
Office 763-4553.

Ii l

I

I

K"Paul
subtle,
poetic,

CAh wA dv'44i enoice4

3020 Washtenaw Dial 434-1782
NIGHTLY AT 7:30
Yn new screen splendor...
The mostmagnificent
picture ever!
DAVIDOSRZNICGKSatrno' aamc Rrewrs

ooO"
6 e

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m.: Worship
Services, Sunday School (2-20 yrs.).
Infants' room available Sunday and
Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Li-
berty St.: Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat.,
10-5; Closed Sundays and Holi-
days.
For transportation, call 668-6427.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
2580 Packard Road, 971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor, 971-3152
Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.
Worship: 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Training Hour: 6 p.m.
* ~* *
HURON HILLS BAPTIST
CHURCH: 3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation,
personalized help, etc., phone 769-
6299 or 761-6749.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
On the Campus at the corner of
State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Sr. Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
* * *
THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron St., Phone 663-9376
* * *
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Don Postema, MinisterI
Morning Worship Service-10:40
a.m.
Coffee Hour-11:00 a.m.
Evening Service-6:00 p.m.
Debate: "The Christian's Role in
Politics"-7:00 p.m.
"DID YOU KNOW that
Washteniw County CAN of-
ford free ambulance service for
everyone - NOW . ..
KATHY
FOMTIK

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF CHRIST 1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Services of Worship at 9:00 and
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149 a910:30 a.m.-Sermon: "On Counting
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr.; R. E. the Cost." Preaching: Robert E.
( Simonson. Sanders.

-Also-

R

9 a.m.: Morning Prayer.
10 a.m.: Worship Service and'
Church School.
* *' *t
FIRST UNITED METHODIST I
CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-
TION - State at Huron and Wash.
9:30 a.m.-Contemporary Youth
Service.
11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Don-
ald B. Strobe.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday:
d5:30 p.m. - Celebration, Wesley
Lounge.
6:15 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room.I
7:00 p.m. - Program, Wesley
Lounge.
Thursday:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion
Class, Pine Room.
6:00 p.m.-Grad Community. Call
668-6881 for information.
Friday:
6:15 p.m.--Young Marrieds, Wes-
ley Lounge. Dinner and program
on election issues with speaker
from League of Women Voters.
Saturday:
All day work project.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.: Holy Eucharist.
1000 a.m.: Holy Eucharist and
Sermon.

COLLEGE PROGRAM
Bible Study - Sundays at 10:30
a.m.; Tuesdays-12:00 to 1:00;
Holy Communion - Wednesdays
5:15 to 5:45.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
"From ghoulies and ghosties,
And Long Leggity Beasties,
And things that go bump in
the night,
Good Lord, deliver us!"
Celebrate an early Halloween
with the people at CanterburyI
People. Sunday, 11 a.m., at the
People's Ballroom, 502 E. Wash-
ington.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m-
Worship Services
Sunday at 9:15 a.m.-Bible Study.
Wednesday at 10 p.m.-Midweek
Worship.
* * *
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC, LCA) (formerly
Lutheran Student Chapel)
801 S. Forest (Corner of Hill St.)
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday Worship-10:30 a.m.
Sunday Supper-6:15 p.m.
Program-7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Eucharist-5:15 p.m.

ALIcE9S
"Alice" at 1 p.m., 4:15, 7:25
"Sex" at 2:45, 6 p.m., 9:15
DIAL 668-6416

I '

CLAM rr T? iner I
(LARK GABLE of Ten
VCLMEN LEIG A adem
S}N IGHAwardsa
LI'SLI L HOW)~ARD

T HE UNION GA L LERY Presents
R
ARTS AND CRAFTS
from the Yarkon Gallery of Boston
L Saturday & Sunday, November 4 & 5
I in the Michigan Union

i..

F,

11

4

I

TODAY -3 p.m. and 8 p.m.

Dem.

Commissioner
Pd. Pol. Adv.

{

BRIGHTON CINEMA 3
1-96 and Grand River-227-6144
CINEMA I -
Dr. Zhivago
CINEMA 11-
A Separate Peace
CINEMA I11-"P
Play Misty for Me
ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
Frenzy
MATINEES WED., SAT., SUN.
Admission $1.00
Theatre Club ID cards-75c
(for sr. citizens and students)
for student regular evening
admission at $1.25
Eve. shows start at 7:30

I NOV. 4-5

TONIGHT & TOMORROW
REEFER
MADN ESS,
Bizzaro 1936 Fright Flick, dramatizing the
effects of the killerweed: sexual depravity,
insanity, or suicide.
-PLUS-
FI RESIGNTHEATRE-

PAID ADVERTISEMENT
Reefer Madness
King Kong Duplex
Showing Tonight
& Tomorrow
In a unique innovation in campus
film showing, Friends of Newsreel will
show a bizarre 1936 anti-marijuana
film, "reefer Madness," with a short
film by the Fireside Theater, side-by-
side with a separate showing of the
horror-humor classic "King Kong" to-
night and tomorrow in Auditoriums
3 & 4 of the Modern Languages Build-
ing. Proceedings will be further en-
livened by a live stage skit with
"Kong," billed as "a personal appear-
ance by King Kong and his Gorrillas."
According to Glen Allvord, a spokes-
man for the student community or-
ganization, the unique duplex film
showing was occasioned by the non-
delivery of the film "Dracula," which
war to have been double-billed with
"King Kong" at $1.50 last Tuesday

TONIGHT & TOMORROW

the original uncut version unseen for 35 years
KING KONG
Starring FAY WRAY
The saga of a primordial gorilla as big as a
battleship-torn from his jungle kingdom,
thrust into the heurtless hustle and bustle
of a modern city, and of his rebellion
against commercial exploitation. Humor-
ous! Heartwarming! Horrifying! Terrifying
and Tender! Socially Significant!
-PLUS-

m

3are

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