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September 07, 1972 - Image 64

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

i hursday, September 7, 1912

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Ihursday, September 7, 19/2

foreign students
share cultures

By PAUL RUSKIN
Diversity is the word that best
describes Rive Gauche, where
students from 80 different coun-
tries come together to exchange
ideas, learn about each other,
and just plain enjoy themselves.
Located at the corner of East
University and Hill, Street, Rive
Gauche is an international coffee
house open every Mo n d ay
through Saturday from 8:00 to
12:00 to all members of the com-
munity. Thursday is a, particu-

larly good time to attend, since
free refreshments are served.
Rive Gauche coffee house is
sponsored by the International
S t u d e n t s Association (ISA),
which also runs a number of
other programs. For instance, two
nights a week ISA holds language
nights at Rive Gauche, when
everyone speaks a certain for-
eign language. During the past
year, French, Spanish, Indian,
Chinese and Arabic language
nights were held, among many
others.

ISA has a membership of over
300, foreign and American stu-
dents. According to ISA presi-
dent In-Kuin Kim, it is the only
organization on campus which is
dedicated to bringing together
people f r o m differnt countries
and Americans. He says that
foreign students experience a
great deal of pressure when they
first come to the University be-
cause they must produce aca-
demically while trying to adjust
to a new language and culture.
As a result, most foreign stu-
dents fall into a pattern of spend-
ing most of their time in the li-
brary, never m e e t i n g many
American or foreign students
except people from their own
country.
At the same time, In-Kuin Kim
complains that "most American
students pass up a golden once
in a lifetim'e opportunity by not
meeting the foreigners who are
at the University." To alleviate
this situation, ISA was organized
three years ago.

Besides its social activities, an intensive off-campus introduc- Center provides students with u .. 1 4
ISA also sponsors a variety of tion to American culture during legal counseling of this sort.
educational programs through- the weekend before school be- A second major concern of
foreign students is money. Al-
out the school year. For instance, gins. Included in this orienta- hough the center doesn't pro-
every March the ISA, along with tion, which costs $25, is infor- vide students with financial aid, n.
the F o r e i g n Student Board mation on academic attainment, it does help them find other
(FSB), sponsors a world fair. and general information, about sources of money.
This past year, the fair featured Ann Arbor and the University. The International Center is
workshops on the third world, According to the center's much less active in providing
women throughout the world, and Assistant Director Jim Mont- foreign students with social ac-
the United Nations (UN), as well gomery, a major concern of all tivities than is ISA. However, it s
as a week of concerts, foreign students is their legal does sponsor an international tea
ISA holds two open meetings status in the United States. every Wednesday afternoon at \
a year in order to attract new Montgomery says there are five the center.
members. This fall the first differenttypes of visas thatia A final opportunity for meeting
meeting is scheduled for Sept. foreign student can get, depend- foreign students is provided by
12 at 8:00 in the Multipurpose ing upon a number of considera- over 20 clubs which are spon- f
Room of the Undergraduate Li- tions such as how long they will sored by various nationalities.
brary. be in the country, on whether or These clubs often hold their own
Also involved with the needs not they will work while in the nights at Rive Gauche to expose
of foreign students is the Inter- Unitd States. The International people to their particular culture.
national Center. Located in thebon
basement of the Michigan Union, ~
the center is concerned mainly "rR >§
with orientation programs for RESHMEN ruv:
new foreign students and legal
aid for all foreign students. IfAyou do 't
Before arriving in Ann Arbor, 1
new students receive introduc- shop FOLLETT'S
tory material from the Interna-
tional Center. This material pro- -nt
vides them with information con- yOU rmay be paying to1
cerning housing, financial ar-y1
rangements, transportation, and m Uch for your books. INTRODUCES
health requirements.
Upon arrival at the University, THOUSANDS OF USED
the center provides the student
with assistance in finding hous- at up to 331 % off
ing, and registering for classes. AND
Starting in mid-August, informa- COMPARE OUR NEW
tion sessions are held twice a
day at the center's office to pro- BOOK PRICES TOO!
vide students with additional in-
formation. The center sponsors D oublek'ts
F forany
HEY PARDNERS! occassion
Haggar doubleknits! You
This Fall Is Round-up Time at the Old U-Bar-M hardly know you are
wearing slacks. 100%
Ranch, and We Want All You New Folks to Saddle .Fortrel polyester double
«. ~~knit fashioned as onlyu f
Haggar can with wide belt
Up and Ride on Over to: y~loops and a gentleman's
flare that's ready to wear
'a Machine washable and
1 dryable.
fall Orientation Activities L$ y18Y
(SEPTEMBER 5-8)
INCLUDING:I
* President's Welcome with theeR
Men's Glee Club____ __
* Bicycle Outing-Bring your bikes ON MAIN STREErT, ANN ARBO.
iI
.: " Bands On the DiagMen's Dept. Street Level
Included in Our Fine Collections
A~~* Diag crazinessF
You Will Also. Find . . .
* Folk concert and sing-a-longYin
>"ARROW * FARAH * LEVI
.. * And more! ROBERT BRUCE * JOCKEY
. r* VA N HEUSEN MANN
<? All Mosey on Down and H.I.S. * SWANK * REVERE
Join the Fun, Y'Here? ,d* BRIAN McNEIL
1 .
F T g(Cpg W W% . S S F:t :/Y .\G

.4

{I

studying
abroad

Does studying . in another
country appeal to you?
The University offers two
"junior year abroad" programs,
one in Aix-en-Provence, France,
and one in Freiburg, Germany.
"In residency" credit is given
for both programs.
In order to qualify, students
may be of all classes as long as
they have mastered a two-year
proficiency in the related for-
eign languages.
The programs are offered in
conjunction with other univer-
sities, including the University
of Wisconsin, Michigan State
Unitersity and Wayne State
University.
Tuition and room and board
prices are colnparable to those
at the University, explains Jan
Apple, speaking for the program.
For further information contact
the Students Abroad Office in
1058 LSA or call 763-4794.
In addition to the University's
study-abroad program, oppor-
tunities to study in another
country are offered by the
School of Education, and the
newly organized Students A-
broad.
HAIRSTYLING
AS YOU LIKE IT!
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS-SHAGS
and RAZOR CUTS
Dascola Barbers
.@611 E. University
0 near Michigan Theatre

THE GOLDEN FALCON
S. . . Live Entertainment . .
from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m.r
Monday through Sunday
. Food . . .
At very reasonable
prices
...Happy Hour! .v
Monday through Friday
a4-6:30 $
v
;C 314 S. Fourth Ave.
761-3548
OPEN 11 A.M. TO 2 A.M. WEEKDAYS
3 P.M. TO 2 A.M. SATURDAY-SUNDAY
C . T a. c.?". .G =c ...N., .N !1 . N. id >> . b

The largest-selling watch in Switzerland

call u's early
end well yet
your a phony
you an live
ith
IFW- RMnn the
reght fl
starti

We try pretty hard to
make it easy for students to get
through to people.
For example, we ve set up
a special system so that you
can order your phones before
you arrive for the Fall term.
f You simply call us collect.
Dial (Area Code 313)
761-9900, and tell us where
you'll be living and when you'll
arrive. And we'll have your
phone connected on time.
If you're in town, you may
visit our business office at 324
East Huron, anytime between
8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
through Friday. On Saturday,
September 9th only, we'll be
open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. by
telephone.
But don't forget. Order
your phone service early and
you won't have a wait problem.

#1

,)I

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