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October 31, 1972 - Image 12

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-31

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 31, 1972

Israel bombs Syria

PEACE ULTIMATUM
U.S. challenged to sign pact

(Continued from Page 1) 1
the guerrilla bases was a reprisal
for the hijack incident, but agreed
with a questioner that one effect
of the raids might be to lessen Arab
jubilation at Sunday's events.
A Syrian communique said the
jets struck at civilian targets and
that an undisclosed number of ci-
vilians, including women and chil-
dren, were killed or wounded.
Israel claimed the attacks were
confined to military targets.
Commenting on Syrian reports,
Elzar said he did not think there
were women and children in the
commando bases.
Egypt's M i d d 1 e East News
Agency said 25 bodies were taken
to Damascus hospitals after the
raids near the capital and more
bodies werehbeing found in the
debris. Arab reports put the toll
at 45 dead and 70 wounded.
At the Tripoli press conference,
the three commandos brushed aside
a question whether any of them
opened fire on the Israeli hostages,

saying "This was irrelevant. It
made no difference."
When told the hostages were un-
armed, they said, "We know that.
So are all civilians now being kill-
ed in Arab countries by Israeli
planes."
The three, Ibrahim Badran, Sa-
mer Mohammed Abdullah, and
Abdel Kadirel Dnawy, appeared
nervous at times during the press
conference.
Badran told the questioners, "We
were not after killing. We are not
savages, terrorists or monsters. We
hoped the operation in the Munich
Olympics would succeed without
bloodshed. We merely wanted to
release our friends in Israeli
prisons.
"After the German betrayal we
had no regrets. We knew we had
to die. This was also obviously the
fate of the hostages," he added.
Abdullah. said he had been sure
the Black September organization,
which claimed responsibility for
the Munich operation, would' free
them one day

(continued from Page 1)
Nixon "in return for a few bal-
lots."
Speaking for President Nguyen
Van Thieu, the broadcast said any
U.S. - Hanoi settlement "will be
worthless" if he does not sign it,
and he has no intention of approv-
ing the current, tentative agree-
ment.
The State Department said it
does not share Saigon's assess-
ment of the situation nor of Hanoi
motives.
Anyway, other American offic-
ials said they still consider Thieu's
position, including the broadcast,
as aimed more at his internal po-
litical situation, rather than Wash-
ington.
Both North and South Vietnam
raised the question of whether U.
S. presidential politics was play-
ing a part in the Nixon adminis-
tration's peace negotiations.
Radio Hanoi, quoting the Com-
munist party newspaper Nhan
Dan, asked of the Nixon adminis-
tration "Do they want to use the
negotiations to servethe political
goals they pursue in their coun-
try?"
The broadcast was referring to
the U. S. request for more timej

before signing because of opposi- Parallel, informants cautioned that
tion in Saigon. the waters are still dangerous to
The withdrawal of the American ocean going traffic since active

ado Me
N4N7'ADS
i

1973
GREMLIN

AMPIEAWUI
AMEI

fleet was seen as another gesture
of good will in an effort to get a
peace settlement with the North
Vietnamese.
Dozens of carriers, cruisers and
destroyers have quietly steamed
southward below the 20th Parallel,
and the Navy has halted all bom-
bardment and new mining of North
Vietnamese waters above the line,
the informants said.
It had been disclosed earliereand
confirmed by Defense Secretary
Melvin Laird that all air strikes
had been halted above the 20th
Parallel.
The 20th Parallel is just above
the port of Thanh Hoa, 85 miles
south of Hanoi and 210 miles north
of the demilitarized zone separat-
ing tne Vietrams. The U. S. re-
duction in effect halts all types
of attacks against North Viet-
nam's heartland, including the ma-
jor cities of Hanoi and Haiphong
and the vital northeast and north-
west rail lines connecting with
China.
While the placing of new mines
has been halted above the 20th

mines still remain.
Although the United States .is
not replacing the new mines that
have automatically deactivated,
there are still other types that
must be deactivated by other
means. Thus far, informants said,
no move has been made to do
this.
DII
IUse Daily
ClIass i fi eds

STOCK UNITS
Still Only
$1021:

*

I

If Eating Helps
You Study, Study
At Our Tables.
Of Course, We Still Have
Live En te rtoainment
Wee kends. No Cover
Charge.
Halfway Inn
in back of
east quad

I

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READ
VAGINAL
POLITICS

I

Base Price
CAMPUS AMER-ICAN
American Motors Service Headquarters
2448 Washtenaw 434.2424
Show Room Hours 9 to 9, Friday and Saturday 'til 6

IMPORTANT REFERENDA
Tax proposals on ballot
(Continued from Page 1) have a cut in funds, but that will
equalize school funding across the be a hard fight with a flat rate
state and thus equalize the "qual-I tax."
ity of education." Proposal D would, however, al-
This equalization would beac- rlow the legislature to impose a
complished by collecting school ; graduated tax replacing the flat
taxes from the entire state and rate tax. A flat rate tax charges
then distributing the funds to each everyone at the same rate of taxa-
district. Under the present system tion regardless of ability to pay. A
districts with highly taxable prop- graduated one taxes more heavily
erty bases are able to raise far those whose ability to pay is
more school taxes than other greater.j

1,

I

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li
t

LSA faculty group backs
Prof. Green in hearings
(Continued from Page 1) Green claims that the committee
may harden their decisions on the has said unofficially that these
matter solely on the basis of Prof. other charges will not be consid-
Dunn's side of the story." ered, but has given no public as-
A further problem in the hear- surance of that decision.
ings, according to Burt, concerns Burt presented these criticisms
the lack of specification of charges. to the committee last week but as
At the present time only two yet the committee has not an-
charges have formally been made swered.
against Green. These are: The committee was meeting last
-"that Prof. Green abused his night and could not be reached for
academic perogatives by present- comment.

t
I

+ Use

Daily Classifieds +

areas.
Perry Bullard, Burghardt's Dem-'
ocratic opponent, comments "the
best plan for distributing money
to schools is a per student alloca-
tion with a cost of living adjust-
ment." The actual method of dis-
tribution would be decided by the
state legislature provided proposal
C is approved.
Bullard adds "no district should
Forest fires bure
mfore tMomtrees

Both the Human Rights and
Democratic parties support ap-
proval of proposal D. The Repub-
lican Party does not. Renner rea-
sons that "the proposal fails to,
provide constitutional limits on the
rate of graduation. Many people;
fear the graduated tax will be
made stiffer as time goes by, if
the system of graduation is not+
frozen."+
Burghardt and Bullard personal-
ly reject any constitutional amend-
ment freezing the rate of gradua-
tion. Says Burghardt "such an
amendment decreases public con-
trol of taxes. It becomes taxationi
without representation."
If proposal D is approved thee
legislature is not obligated to in-
stitute a graduated income tax,
but Burghardt and Renner predict
the legislature probably would pass
a graduated tax of some kind. If
proposal D is passed, counties and'
townships have the option of levy-
ing local graduatedaincome taxes
regardless of state action.,
Conservative candidate for State
Representative Alan Harris could
not be reached for comment on the
question.

ing the NARMIC (anti-war) slide
show in his Chemistry 227 class;
-"that Prof. Green knowingly
disregarded a reasonable order
from the Acting Chairman of the
Department of Chemistry to dis-
continue the slide show."
Burt's statement, however, re-
fers to other charges made in a
memorandum from Prof. Dunn.

SPECIAL LANGUAGE
UNITED NATIONS OP) - A
booklet on the U. N. Trusteeship
Council is being published in "Pid-
gin English" for the Australian-
run territory of New Guinea and
neighboring Papua, where that
version of English is spoken.

THE STREETCORNER SOCIETY
Presents: "THE WOMAN PLAY"
Discussion afterwards to be led by SHIRLEY BUR-
GOYNE and DR. JAN SCHNEIDER
Friday, November 3rd, at 7 p.m.
126 Residential College (E. Quad)
DONATION $1.50
Benefit for University of Michigan Students for
Abortion Referendum
L - - - - - --_- - - -

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cashed here
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2 oz. 40's
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The clearest choice for a generation

So McGovern can't win, eh?
Where have you heard that before?
In the primaries last Spring,
that's where.
But you fooled the political
experts and rewrote the history
books. You provided the manpower
and womanpower for the largest,
smoothest, toughest vote-canvas-
sing operation this country had
ever seen.
Now it's time to do it again.
And the job this Fall is even more
important. For the choice between
Nixon and McGovern is the clear-
est choice voters have had for a
generation.
McGovern has opposed the
bombing of Indochina, while
Nixon has been inflicting the ex-
plosive equivalent of 7 Hiroshima
atom bombs a month on that al-
ready devastated area.
Nixon believes in putting peo-
ple out of work in order to hold
down prices. His policies have put
2 million more people out of work.
McGovern believes that there
should be a job for everyone who

ernment itself as the employer of
last resort.
Nixon started his campaign
with $10 million in secret money.
McGovern's campaign is financed
almost entirely by contributions
of $5 to $25 from the people.
Nixon has nominated conserv-
atives and mediocrities to the
United States Supreme Court.
One or two more Nixon appoint-
ments if he is re-elected, and you'll
live with a heavy-handed Nixon
court for the rest of your life.
McGovern has pledged to appoint
a woman and members of racial.
and ethnic minorities, and will ap-
point highly qualified liberals.
Ralph Nader says the Nixon

Administration is "the most cor-
rupt in our history." The late
Robert Kennedy called George
McGovern "the most decent man
in the Senate."
McGovern wants the million-
aires and the large corporations to
start paying their fair share of
taxes. Nixon wants to maintain
the status quo.
Get an absentee ballot if you
need one. Get some money to-
gether to help us make get-out-
the-vote phone calls. And get to-
gether with your local McGovern
Committee to find out how you
can help.
You started this campaign. It's
up to you to finish it.

------------
1 Send money while there'
I Help us buy get-out-the-
I

s still time!
vote phone calls.

------
I

Age of McGovern Box 100, A-M, Washington, D.C. 20005
YES, I want to help get out the vote for George McGovern. Enclosed is my
contribution of:
O $5 to pay for 50 phone calls to voters Q $25 to pay for 250 phone calls to voters
O $10 to pay for l00 phone calls to voters Q (whatever you can give)

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