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October 31, 1972 - Image 11

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-31

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Tuesday, October 31, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Eleven

-aat IResect4
Those boredom freaks.. .

T ey're at it again
john papanek
IF A CERTAIN routund sports writer thinks that Saturday's 42-0
was a big bore, he should have picked up his royal
hindness and moved.
He should have left the warmth and dryness of the press box,
and ventured forth to where the games are never boring-the
stands.
I don't know anyone who thinks that the game was as big a
bore as he did, in fact most people thought seeing Michigan play
the kind of devastating game it played Saturday was damned
exciting.
Of course a 42-0 game could never approach the excite-
ment of a 20-17 win over Purdue, or a 10-7 squeaker over
Ohio State. But if the people who come, come expecting to
see Michigan blow out their weaker opponents like Minnesota,
how can they be bored when their team does just that?
As for all the people who began to walk out in the third
quarter when the score was 35-0, well even as Bo Schem-
bechler himself put it yesterday, "Hell, if it's 35-0 and it's
raining, I'd walk out too, wouldn't you?"
That's it, exactly. Those people who walked out saw just
what they came to see, and by the third quarter, with poorer
weather prospects ahead, they got up and headed for the exits.
I'd call them satisfied, not bored.
There is something about watching a football game from a
press box that can make a writer insensitive to the emotion of
the game, supplied partly by the crowd. Sometimes this is good;
it allows a writer to write objectively and not be influenced by
any fans' delerium.

AP Photo
DALLAS COWBOY running back Calvin Hill bursts through a huge
hole in the Detroit Lions' defense last night in the game in Texas.
Hill and his teammates moved almost at will against the Motor
City boys' porous defense as the Cowboys won the game 28-24.

'Pokes ,rour
DALLAS U)--Super Bowl cham- ground with Calvin Hill doing most I
pion Dallas, struggling to stay of the work. But, when the march
alive in the race to the 1972 Na- hit the Detroit 38, Morton lofted a!
tional Football League playoffs, touchdown pass to Billy Parks to
rode the passing arm of much- give the Cowboys a 7-0 lead with
maligned quarterback Craig Mor- Toni Fritsch kicking the extra
ton to a crucial 28-24 victory over point.
the Detroit Lions last night. Detroit failed to move the ball
Morton, who took over from and the Cowboys got the ball back
Super Bowl hero Roger Staubach and again churned through the
after the darling of the Dallas' Lions almost at will. Hill con-
fans was injured during the, ex- tinued to be the workhorse but itI
hibtion season, threw three touch- was Morton that executed the big
down passes and set up the fourth plays. He rifled an 41-yard pass toc
TD with his tosses in the national- tight end Jean Fugett before un-
ly-televised game. corking another bomb, a 33-yard
The victory kept the Cowboys TD shot to Hill behind the Lions'r
within one game of Washington in secondary. Dallas was ahead 14-0N
the National Conference East with at the end of the first quarter. t
a 5-2 record while the loss dropped Detroit was handed a big breakf
Detroit into a tie with Green Bay early in the second quarter. Hill
at 4-3 for the lead in the NFC took a handoff but the ball was
Central. kicked out of his hand by team-
Dallas took the opening kickoff mate tackle Ralph Neeley, whot
and began slugging away on the i was throwing a block on the line.
Michigan np OU
grabs fourth int pollc
By The Associated Press Oklahoma blasted Kansas StateI
Southern California, 41abama 52-0, UCLA turned back Washing-t
and Nebraska held onto the top ton State 35-20, Texas crushed Ricet
three positions in The Associated 45-9 and Penn State downed Westc
Press college football poll while Virginia 28-19.f
Michigan and Ohio State swapped It marked the first appearanceI
the next two spots and Colorado of the season in the Top Twentyr
dropped out of the Top Ten. for Missouri, Louisville and Texas
The Trojans of Southern Cal Tech. They replaced Florida State,
blanked Oregon 18-0 for their Southern Methodist and West Vir-
eighth consecutive victory and re- ginia.
ceived 41 first-place votes and 988
of a possible 1,000 points from a ::::::'. ..........
nationwide panel of sports writers
and broadcasters.
Alabama, which ran its record to
7-0 with a 48-11rout of Southern 1. Southern California (41) 8-0 988
2. Alabama (3) 7-0 811
Mississippi, received three first- 3. Nebraska (4) 6-1 750
place ballots and 811 points while 4. MICHIGAN (1) 7-0 694
defending champion Nebraska 5. Ohio State (1) 6-0 629
whipped Oklahoma State 34-0 for 6. Louisiana state 6-0 558
its fourth straight shutout and 7.OkCLAhoma -1 7
earned four No. 1 votes and 750 9. Texas 5-1 301
points. (tie) Daily Libels (2) 7-0 301
Michigan, fifth last week, 10. Penn State 6-1 290
11. Auburn 6-1 238
climbed to fourth with 694 points 12. Notre Dame 5-1 196
following a 42-0 trouncing of Min- 13. Tennessee 4-2 122
nesota while Ohio State slipped to 14. Iowa state 5-1 112
fifth with 629 points after strug- 15. Colorado 6-2 92
gling past Wisconsin 28-20. 17. Louisville 6-0 20
Idle Louisiana State remained 18. Texas Tech 6-1 19
in sixth place but Colorado lost to 19. Air Force 6-1 17
Missouri 20-17 and skidded from 20. Arkansas 5-2.10
seventh to 15th. That enabled Ok- Ofthers receiving votes, listed alpha-
lahoma, UCLA, Texas and Penn betically: Arizona State, Florida State,
State to move up one spot apiece Georgia, North Carolina, North Caro-
to the 7-8-9-10 berths. lina state, Purdue.

Id

daily
sportsr
NIGHT EDITOR:
RICHARD STUCK
Lions' linebacker Mike Lucci re-j
covered at the Cowboys 18.
Landry rushed eight yards on a
keeper, but then it got sticky. Four
running plays made only eight
yards before the running quarter-
back slammed the final two yards
for a touchdown to cut the Dallas
lead to 14-7.
Morton's brilliant first half con-
tinued as the Cowboys stormed
back with a 66-yard march to make
it 21-7. Walt Garrison gained 23
yards in four carries. Then Morton
hit Mike Montgomery with a 27-
yard screen pass to the Detroit
one. Montgomery, taking over for
Hill, plunged the final yard for the
score with 2:16 left in the half.
Detroit made the final seconds
count. Earl McCullough threw a
23-yard pass to Charlie Sanders on
what started as a reverse play.
Then, Landry hit Altie Taylor ,over
the middle and the speedster shot
to the sidelines on a 40-yard touch-
down play. Dallas tried a 49-yard
field goal in the final minute but
Fritsch's kick was wide to the
right.
Detroit continued to nibble away

up

L onS
at the Dallas lead in the third
quarter. Landry and tight end San-
ders hooked up on a 35-yard pass
and the Lions moved deep into
Cowboy territory, but the Dallas
defense stiffened and Errol Mann
kicked a 17-yard field goal to make
the score 2117.
As the third quarter ended, rain
began pouring through the 1-acre
opening in the Texas Stadium.
The Cowboys put the game away
with an impressive 76-yard drive in
10 plays in the fourth quarter.
Morton hit Fugett with a 19-yard
pass to set up his third touchdown
pass of the game. He picked up a
Lion blitz and found Montgomery
open on the left sideline. The pass
and run for the score covered 35
yards.
Detroit made the final score 28-
24 when Landry passed to Larry
Walton for 21 yards and a touch-
down with 1:36 remaining on the
clock.
Season tickets for Michigan
basketball and hockey seasons
are on sale entitling the Univer-
sity's faculty, staff and students
to reduced rates for both sports.
Although regular reserve ticket
prices are $36, staff and faculty
general admission tickets for the
18-game hockey schedule a r e
$18, students $9.
The sale of student basketball
season tickets will be announced
later.

But it can be had, too. Especially when the writer has
been in so many press boxes for so many games that he
forgets what a large part the crowd plays. Especially at
Michigan football games.
It's hard to substantiate, but from traveling to other
stadia, in and out of the Big Ten, nowhere does the crowd
come to the games for pure enjoyment more than a Michigan
crowd.
In other places, they drink and maybe smoke some dope, but
at Michigan, there is an interaction within the crowd and between
the crowd and the people on the field that makes games in
Michigan Stadium unique.
Saturday, for instance, I was talking with Dave Pedersen,
sports editor of the Minnesota Daily. I told him about the Home-
coming celebrations: the sock hop, the bizzarre parade, the weird
things that generally go on in the stadium, and he was quite
amazed. At Minnesota, Homecoming is dead, he told me. They
didn't bother to change it into something fun, they just let it die.
Somehow, the sight of gymnastic coach and alumni cheer-
leader Newt Loken being passed up the stands rump for rump
with an attractive (in MCP standards) Minnesota cheerleader
is a sign that the people in the stands are anything but bored.
And sure Whiskey the dog got a big roar when she scored
a 90-yard touchdown. After all, it's a DOG pushing a football
with its NOSE! If that doesn't deserve a big cheer, neither
does Jimi Hendrix playing the guitar with his teeth.
Meanwhile, the "boring" accusations are starting to baffle
Schembechler and his team. "My players think I'm nuts the way
I talk about these other teams, and then we go out and beat
them," Bo says. "When I see Colorado coming off that big win
over Oklahoma and then losing to Missouri, I really get scared."
So Bo makes sure that his players are ready for each and
every game. "Our team has not gotten down by looking ahead
too far," Bo said Saturday. "We use a goal system to keep the
players up all the time."
And this year's biggest goal,, which looms larger and
larger every week, is a possible showdown for the mythical
but ultimately prestigous National Championship with South-
ern Cal in the 1973 Rose Bowl.
That thought is far back in Bo's mind, but it's there. And he
will never sacrifice a chance to be the best in favor of "enter-
taining" the fans with some kind of wide-open bomb-throwing
Come on. Being number one, now THAT would be exciting.

Conference Standings
Ivy Stanford 2 2 "0 5 2 0
Washington 2 2 0 6 2 0
Conf All Games Washington State 2 2 0 5 3 0
WLT WL3California 1 4 0 1 7 0
WLT WLT Oregon 1 4 0 2 6 0
Dartmouth 2 0 1 4 0 1 Oregon State 0 4 0 1 7 0

a

i

Harvard
Cornell
Yale
Brown
Penn
Columbia
Princeton

2
1
S 1
V f

0
I
1
2
2

Mid-American

1
0
0
0
1
0
I
I
0
1
1
0

Kent State
Bowling Green
! Ohio
{Toledo
Western Michigan
Miami, Ohio

w
1
1

L
1
2
2
2

3 1
4 1
4'1
1 4
3 2
1 3
1 3
'N L
3 4
4 2
4 4
5 3
4 3
5. 2
W L
5 1
4 4
3~ 4
5 2
4 3
3 5
1 6

1
0
0
(I
0
1
1
T
1
1
0
0
T
0
0
1
0
0

Texas
Arkansas
Texas Tech
Saylor
SMU
TC
Rice
Texas A & M

W L
3 0
2 1
2 1
1 1
1 1
0 2
0 3

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

w
8
s
6
3
4
4
1

L
1
5
1
3
2
3
6

Southwest

a N. rti

Atlantic Coast

North Carolina
Duke
Clemson
North Carolina
Maryland
Virginia
Wake Forest
B
Nebraska
Iowa State
Oklahoma State
Colorado
Oklahoma
Missouri
Kansas State
Kansas

Have some lime on

W L
3 0
3: 1
2 1
state 2 1
2 2
0 3
0 4
ig Eight
W' L
3 0
2 1
21
3 2
1 2
1 3
0 3

T
0
0
1
0
U
T
0
0
0
0
0
a
0
0

Southeastern
W L T
Alabama 5 0 0
LSU 2 0 0
Auburn 3 1 0
Georgia 3 1 0
Florida 2 1 0
Kentucky 1 3 0
Mississippi 1 3 0
Mississippi State 1 3 0
rennessee 0 2 0
Vanderbilt 0 4 0

W L
7 0
6 0
6 1
5 2
3 2
2 5
4 3
4 4
5 2
3 4

T
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
a
T
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

your hands?.
Truck on
Daily and
+( ness Staff
at 420 Maync

down

to the

join the Busi-
lard

M-F 10-12, M-W-F 2-4, or Call 764-0560

I

'N
5
4
e

L
i
I'
1
1
2
5
5

Pacific Eight

Southern Cal
UCLA

WN L
5 0
4 0

W L
8 0
7 1

NOTICE
TO ALL
DISPLAY ADVERTISERS
Due to space limitations, advertising clos -
ing may occur prior to regularly announced
deadlines.
In all cases, advertising will be accepted on
a "first come-first serve" basis.
-The Daily Business Staff
Subscribe to The Daily
Phone 764-0558

r f Lf n ^A^r

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Michigan Daily.

FOR JUSTICE SAKu:E. . VNM1
A PROVEN JUDGE
to the CIRCUIT COURT BENCH

if
you
see
news
happen
call
76-DAILY

ELECT JUDGE f
Edward D.
DEAKE4
as one of your two
new Circuit Court judges
for Washtenaw County
" 18 yrs. on the bench as Municipal Judge
# 4 yrs. on the bench as District Judge
* Currently presiding Judge, 14th District
* Graduate of Univ. of Michigan Law School
* An experienced lawyer
0 Member, Board of Governors, N. American
Judges Assn.
* Life-long resident of Washtenaw County
Promote Judge EDWARD D. DEAKE
TO THE CIRCUIT COURT BENCH
NON-PARTISAN BALLOT-TUESDAY, NOV. 7
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0

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