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October 28, 1972 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-28

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October '28, 1972'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SaturdQy, October 28, 1972

Nixon announces large

S. Vietnam: Battered by war

corn

deal with

Chinese

WASHINGTON (M) - President
Nixon yesterday told a nationwide
radio audience that 300,000 tons of
corn - equal to about 12 million
bushels and worth about $18 mil-
lion - had been contracted this
week for sale to China.
This was the first sale of feed
grains to the nation of 800 mil-
lion, although Peking bought 400,-
000 tons of U. S. wheat in mid-
September. The grain sales so far,
Panel r e
year old syp
WASHINGTON (R) - A federal
panel recommended yesterday
that the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare (HEW)
close the books on a controversial
Alabama syphilis experiment and
treat the study's survivors.
HEW officials said they would
comply as rapidly as possible.
The . recommendation was the
first of several expected from a
nine-member panel appointed to
investigate the syphilis experiment
known as the Tuskegee Study.
During the study, which began
in rural Mason County, Ala., in
1932, at least 430 black men with
syphilis were denied treatment for
the disease so that doctors could
determine through eventual au-
topsy what damage 'the disease

Nixon said in the broadcast on paign motorcade through a dozen
farm issues, "only scratched the northern Ohio cities.
surface of an immense trade po- In his- radio address on farm is-
tential between our two countries." sues, Nixon defended -the contro-
Shortly before the President versial grain sale to the Soviet
made the broadcast from the Union, saying the biggest peace-
White House library, aides an- time transaction of its kind in
nounced he would make the history "holds enormous benefit
seventh in his series of campaign for all Americans."
radio speeches today, discuss- Nixon said the agreement "will
ing national defense, before flying raise crop value for America's
to Cleveland to launch a cam- farmers by a billion dollars in
1972 alone." He also claimed it
would aid the balance of payments
s end o 4deficit, create at least 30,000 new
jobs, and save the taxpayers $200
_million in storage and other

AIlis project
does to the human body.
Following disclosure of the Tus-
kegee Study by the Associated
Press last July, Dr. Merlin Du-
Val, HEW's assistant secretary
for health and scientific affairs,
appointed the citizens' panel to in-
vestigate the experiment.
Among other things, DuVal ask-
ed the panel to recommend whe-
ther the study should be continued
and, if not, how to end it in a way
consistent with the rights and
health needs of the survivors.
In returning that recommenda-
tion yesterday, the panel said the
study should be terminated imme-
diately and that medical care, in-
cluding treatment for syphilis, be
provided for the surviving mem-
bers of the study.

charges.
Inhis broadcast, paid for by his
re-election committee, Nixon said
he hadcarried out his commit-
ment to help farmers increase
their income. "Net farm income
this year," he said, "will finally
break the all-time record set 25
years ago."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day throughSunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio): $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

SAIGON (P) - With an Indo-
china cease-fire apparently near,
the map of South Vietnam looks
I remarkably as it did 10 years
ago. Then the Viet Cong were
running wild in the countryside
and the Saigon government was
struggling to keep populated
areas under control and high-
ways open.
Today, as then, most of the
850-mile border from the demili-
tarized zone to the Gulf of Siam
is under the Communist-led
forces' control or a jungle no
man's land ignored by both sides.
Major cities, including all 44
province capitals, are firmly in
Saigon government hands, but
around some are concentrations
of enemy forces who harass de-
fenders, close roads and propa-
gandize the local people as they
did in the early '60s.
Most main highways are open
most of the time, but any one
of these vital lines of communi-
cation can be closed at any
moment, almost anywhere.
Around Saigon itself, long-
time Communist strongholds like
the Iron Triangle, War Zone C,
the Saigon River corridor and
the rubber plantations have
again become operating bases
for enemy forces after a few
years of relative quiet.
In the event of a standstill
cease-fire designed to freeze the
force of both sides in place at
the moment of the truce, the
question of who controls what is
of crucial importance. To at-
to measure this on a map is de-
ceptive because of the vast areas
of no contest, and because the

struggle continues to be more
concerned with people than with
land.
Any future government, no
matter how it is composed will
be faced with a critical prob-
lem - South Vietnam's war
battered economy.
Bled by years of war and
crippled by seven months of the
Viet Cong's latest offensive,
South Vietnam had been due
soon to face the consequences of
falling production and rising in-
flation. With peace perhaps in
sight, economic planners now
must weigh hopes against reali-
ties.
American dollars will be vital,
expert sources say, but it will
take more than cash to stave off
collapse.
For years South Vietnam had
most of the known economic ail-
ments: big imports and small ex-
ports, vigorous inflation and fee-
ble production, growing addic-
tion to foreign aid and a lack of
long-range planning.
Withdrawal of U. S. troops
has caused unemployment and
underemployment, but its effect
was cushioned by the Vietna-
mese custom of sharing income
within the clan or family.

Domestic production increased
more than 4 per cent in 1971 and
the money supply jumped 22 per
cent. As 1972 began, foreign in-
vestors were ready to venture
capital in fishing projects and
heavy industry.
H a n o i ' s spring offensive
changed all that.
Tanks tore up rice fields and
bombs blasted homes and shops.
More than one million refugees
went on the dole. Cement, fer-
tilizer and construction plans
stalled as investors pulled back.
.. What had looked like a boom
year is now expected to produce
a S to 10 per cent drop in na-
tional product, with heavy losses
in key foreign-exchange earners
like rubber and timber.
The end of fighting would re-
move the basic cause of econom-
ic woes.sBut experts predict a
tight, tense period before uphill
recovery.

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
TONIGHT:
ROC KETS
SUNDAY: 9:30-2:00
OPEN JAM SESSION
MONDAY: 5:00-2:00
DIESEL SMOKE AND DANGEROUS CURVES
(formerly with Buddies in the Saddle)
208 W. Huron
LUNCHES DAILY

SCHRISTMAS in
HAWAII
$3393
DEC. 17-DEC. 24
W" Jet round trip Det.
" First-class hotels at Waikiki
Beach, Maui, and Hawaii
0 Sightseeing and transfers
Nat'I Bank of Ypsilanti
TRAVEL BUREAU
611 W. Cross, Ypsi 483-8556

j

lil

c CA 'creii A 4eAp ice4i

I

IN 2 NUTTY
FEATURES!
"THE COCONUTS"
PLUS-
"MONKEY BUSINESS"
Sat., Sun., & Wed.
Continuous from 1 :30 p.m.
Mon. & Tues.rOne Complete
Show at 7:30
DIAL 668-6414

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue
SUNDAY: 10:30 a.m.: Worship
Services, Sunday School (2-20 yrs.).
Infants' room available Sunday and
Wednesday.
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Li-
berty St.: Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat.,
10-5; Closed Sundays and Holi-
days.
For transportation, call 668-6427.
PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST
2580 Packard Road, 971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor, 971-3152
Sunday School, 9:45 a.m.
Worship: 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.
Training Hour: 6 p.m.
* * *
HURON HILLS BAPTIST
CHURCH: 3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation,
personalized help, etc., phone 769-
6299 or 761-6749.
* * *
THE FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Erwin A. Gaede, Minister
Church School and Service at
10:30 a.m.-Sermon: "Man and the
Wheel."
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
On the Campus at the corner of
State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Sr. Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron St., Phone 663-9376
CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw
Don Postema, Minister
Morning Worship Service-10:00
a.m.
Coffee Hour-11:00 a.m.
Evening Service-6:00 p.m.
Debate: "The Christian's Role in!
Politics"-7:00 p.m.
* *
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr.; R. E.,
Simonson.
9 a.m.: Morning Prayer.
10 a.m.: Worship Service and.
Church School.I

TS
Es
E

i

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH and WESLEY FOUNDA-
TION - State at Huron and Wash.
9:30 a.m.-Contemporary Youth
Service.
11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Don-
ald B. Strobe: "How Do We Get
There From Here?"

5:15 to 5:45. ' UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
Special Event - Wednesday at; CHAPEL (LCMS)
7:30 p.m. William Sloane Coffin, 1511 Washtenaw Avenue
chaplain at Yale University, will Alfred T. Scheips, Pastgr

EXTENDS A CORDIAL WELCOME
TO ALL HOMECOMING WEEK-ENDERS
We invite all ski interested people to visit us this morning or after
the game. We offer up to 20% savings on ski and cross country
packages. Come in and check. out the new equipment for the
'722'73 season.

t, -

speak on his recent trip to Hanoi.
* * *
CANTERBURY HOUSE .

Sunday at 9:15 and 10:30 a.m-
Worship Services
Sunday at 9:15 a.m.-Bibe Study.
Wednesday at 10 p.m.-Midweek
Worship.

WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS: "F
Sunday, Oct. 29: An
5:30 p.m. -Celebration, Wesley An
Lounge. n
6:15 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m. - Program, Wesley Go
Younge-Pros and Cons of Abor- CeJ
tion with Mrs. Helen Hunter.
Thursday, Nov. 2: with
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion Peop
Class, Pine Room. Study of Book Peop
of Acts. ipgto
6:00 p.m.-Grad Community. Call
668-6881 for information.
Friday, Nov. 3:
6:15 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Wes-
ley Lounge. Dinner and program I
on election issues with speaker
from League of Women Voters.
Saturday, Nov. 4:
All day work project.

rom ghouli(
d Long Leg
d things the
the night,
od Lord, de
lebrate an
the peop
le. Sunday
le's Ballro
n.
- ~rr

es and ghosties,

age

-UA

gity Beasties, j LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
at go bump in CHURCH (ALC, LCA) (formerly
Lutheran Student Chapel)
eliver us!" 801 S. Forest (Corner of Hill St.)
1 early Halloween -Donald G. Zill, Pastor
le at Canterbury ' Sunday Worship-9:15 and 11:00
a.m.
y, 11 a.m., at the Sunday Supper-6:15 p.m.
om, 502 E. Wash-: Program-7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Eucharist-5:15 p.m.

* * *
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.: Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m.: Holy Eucharist and
Sermon.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Avenue
Services of Worship at 9:00 and
10:30 a.m.-Sermon: "On Keepingl
Upset With the Joneses." Preach-
ing: Robert E. Sanders.
COLLEGE PROGRAM
Bible Study -Sundays at 10:30
a.m.; Tuesdays-12:00 to 1:00;
Holy Communion - Wednesdays

HILLEL FOUNDATION presents
"THE LAST CHAPTER"
Produced by BENJAMIN and LAWRENCE ROTHMAN
Narrated by THEODORE BIKEL
The Story of 1000 Years of Jewish Life in
Poland and the Destruction of Polish Jewry.
50c admission
8 p.m., Sat-Sun., October 28-29,
at H ILLEL, 1429 HILL

This WGUNBD
$2.00
Ed Holstein
singer-songwriter
Ed Holstein's songs have
been recorded by Tom Rush
Jackson Browne, and others.
He played last summer at
the Power Center with John
Fahey.
"Eddie is not only a good
songwriter, and I m e. a n
goodhe's funny as hell."
-Steve Goodmar
-1411 Hill STRIT
IJI SI

KPO

{ I Y

!'{fv
} f

Thel1

972-73

t

University of Michigan

OPEN AT 9:00
2455 S. STATE
1 mile south of campus

1
tiS
:;N
':::i
2t
t:3

STUDENT DIRECTORY
on sale
Monday, October. 30
on the Diag and. at the Engin Arch

sk'.5
N t:;
r< .5.
"p.i

CLOSE AT 5:30
Olin-Rossignol-Kneissl-Head-K2
Trappeur-Ko flach-Hanson--Raichie

!'

3
I U

I

VAGINAL
POLITICS
is coming

Do you Want to Know How to Get into
LAW SCHOOL?
We can't promise anything except some help-
fuhints...
JANE WATERSON
(The director of Admissions'for the Univ. of Michigan Law School)
Will talk about admission policies
at the U of M Law School
Auditorium B-Angell Hall
Wednesday, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m.
Sponsored by the
Undergraduate Political Science Association

i

I

...
>..a; t t s :. ." ......."i .,

I

*** CINEMA I PRESENTS.***
REPULSION
SATURDAY 28 OCTOBER
1965 Roman Polanski. Catherine Deneuve, plays a Beautiful
Sex-Repressed French girl living in London. "Small crocks in the
walls of the apartment flow into crunching indicators of the
heroines crumbling mind . . . An absolute knockout of a movie
in the psychological horror line ,.. . Prepare yourself to be
demolished."-Bosley Crowther
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL, 7 and 9 o'clock-$1.00
"EXTRAORDINARILY JOYFUL . . . BOUND TO STIMULATE
AND MOVE." -Boyum, Wall Street Journal
From the

I

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-- iI

I

J

I 14 0- I

best-seller
that really knew
a generation.

I

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W.. Y4-

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