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October 22, 1972 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Sunday, October 22, 1972

THE MICRIGAN DAILY

''age >evonl

Sunday, October 22, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY rage ~evt~n

I

T.V. listings continued

'NOTHING IS SACRED

Everyone Welcome

Fun, Food,
NEW PEOPLE W

GRAD
COFFEE
HOUR
Wednesday, Oct. 25
8-10 p.m.
West Conference
Room, 4th Floor
RACKHAM
OUTSIDE ON THE TERRACE.
People
/ELCOME!

(Continued from Page 3)
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy-Comedy (BW
56 Speaking Freely
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Mouse Factory
7 Let's Make a Deal
9 The Wacky World of
Jonathan Winters
50 Hogan's Heroes
8:00 2 Gunsmoke
4 Rowan and Martin's Laugh-in
7 Pro Football
9 News
50 Dragnet
56 Profile in Music: Shirley
Verrett
8:30 9 This is the Law
50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Here's Lucy
4 Movie
They Might Be Giants" (71)
George C. Scott imagines him-
self to be Manhattan's Sher-
look Holmes.
9 Political Talk
9:30 2 Doris Day
9 Interview: David Lewis
56 Book Beat
10:00 2 Bill Cosby
9 News, Weather, Sports
50 Perry Mason
56 Realities

10:30 9 Nightbeat
11:00 2 4 7 News, Weather, Sports
9 Cheaters
50 Johnny Mann's Stand Up
and Cheer
11:3e 2 Movie
"The Fool Killer" (65) Civil
Far amnesia victim teams up
with a young orphan-a mood
piece.
4 13 Johnny Carson
7 Movie
"The Barbarian and the Gei-
sha" (58) story of Townsend
Harris' adventures in the
Orient.
9 Movie
"Dreams of Glass" (70) an
fisherman's son, a Japanese-
American girl and their ro-
mance.
50 Movie
"Cutter's Trail" (70) outraged
marshal tracks down MexicanI
outlaws who tried to destroy
his town.
1:00 4 News
1:30 2 Movie
"Freedom Fighters" (62) docu-
mentary footage used for dra-
ma of Hungarian uprising in
1956.
7 News
3:00 2 News

LSA
Coffeehou r
Tuesday, October 24
3:00-4:30 P..
with
The Chemistry. Dept.
3003 Chem. Bldg.
-

Lamp
By SCOTT ZIMMERMAN
"At National Lampoon, the un-
derlying philosophy is that noth-
ing is sacred," said Chris Mil-
ler, a contributing editor, earlier
this week
Features such as "Son-of-God
Comics," "The Dead Kitten Cal-
endar," and "The case of the
Loquatious Rapist" grace the
Lampoon's pages, supporting
Miller's contention.
Fr6m cover to cover, the Lam-
poon espouses irreverance to the
highest degree. It is so wantonly
derisive that no shot is consid-
ered below the belt, and no per-
son and no situation is above sa-
tirical exposition.
The Lampoon, first published
in April, 1970, is "the only mag-
azine that reflects the viewpoint
of this generation," according to
Miller.
He claims that most maga-
zines have a central auithoritar-
ian figure but that the Lampoon
is basically the work of about 10
regular and five occasional con-
tributors.
"There's no pressure from the
editors," Miller says. I contri-
bute most of my stuff to Nation-
al Lampoon because they're the
only ones who will print it."
The Lampoon satirizes issues
from national politics to person-
al intercourse. Its unabashedly
debasing style has provoked
some unfavorable public - re-
sponses ranging from personal
denunciations to law suits.
Walt Disney Productions, for
instance, filed suit when Mini
Mouse appeared topless in one
issue. Charles Shulz proceeded
likewise when Charlie Brown

ion:

and his con patriots appeared in
a "Death is" feature. In it the
characters inadvertently m e t
their doom through child-like
shenanigans.
"Basically," Miller says, "we
don't get a lot of suits. There's
no percentage in suing, and be-
sides, you look like a humorless
idiot. We do get a lot of hate
mail, though."
One man, complaining that he
hadn't received back issues he
ordered, sent the Lampoon eight
sticks of unstable dynamite.
"Later he sent blasting caps
with a note saying he still hadn't
received his issues," Miller says.
"We finally got them to him ..
in jail."
National Lampoon has been
condemned as being racist, sex-
ist, decadent, abrasive and in
generally poor taste. In defense
of the Lampoon philosophy,
Miller cites a section from Janu-
ary's issue entitled "The Vietna-
mese Baby Book," in which the
author plays up the gore and
grotesqueness of the situation.
"Vietnam is in bad taste, not
the Vietnamese Baby Book,"
claims Miller. "In public issues,
a kind of numbness sets in after
awhile. Ilow do we make peo-
ple hear about it? We do is
throughathe black comedy ap-
proach.
"National Lampoon stays close
enough to realitystotscare peo-
ple." -Miller feels that people
tend to repress their awareness
of perhaps distressing truths
about themselves.
"We're ripping something out

Spicy irrev re c

ses:msisi:::ssi:ssisi:ssa

":: J:.::}V :. ".

DORM FASTS
ON ELECI ON DA Y-NOV. 7

4
{y{: :
;7 .I
,.
N;:

Raise Funds for lmnediate Medical Re/.f to Indochina.,
Say No to the U.S. Brutality in SE Asia
Discussions and Vietnamese films on eieczlon eve-sign up
in your dorm by Monday, Oct. 23.
sponsored by the Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars,

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
CHRIS MILLER, contributing editor for the National Lampoon,
explains his magazine's black humor philosophy in' the Michigan
Union. last week.

A GREAT SELECTION OF
+f iisherman Sweaters+0
at
fary 'Dibble
ANN ARBOR
1121 South University

of their subconscience and put-
ting it right in their faces," Mil-
ler says. "So what happens?
They freak out."
The black comedy of the Lam-
poon aims at arousing readers to

more liberally contemplate the
issues.
- "So where do we draw the
line?" Millers asks rhetorically.
"When you do draw the line,
stop and analyze yourself and
figure out why that is all you
can take.
"It's time we grew up and
realized that nothing is so sac-
Ired. People's lives are -sacred,
mankind. is sacred; no person
and no particular institution, can
be so sacred," Miller concludes.

Say "CHEESE

Soup

Wkafiver You figg/4Ti'mgU..

\

_ f
.. . . .. ' _ .

Now you're talking about the No. 1 favorite consomme at
INDIAN SUMMER.
We used to have people come in every Saturday like clock-
work just to feast on this'especially tasty blend of raw milk
cheese, cauliflower and a hostess of other healthy ingredients.
People continue to flip over this Indian Summer specialty,
pleading with us for the recipe and pleasing us with their satis-
fied smiles. Only now CHEESE SOUP is strictly a MONDAY treat.
TOMORROW IS MONDAY
Don't miss this once-in-a-week chance to get a taste for yourself.
You won't need any prompting to smile "Cheese."
INDIAN SUMMER
NATURAL FOODS RESTAURANT
Next to Kresge's on State
Where your body wants to eat

UE__

UNION-LEAGUE

Homecomi'ng '72

"Those Were

the Days..

"7

Re-live the '50's with us !
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 25-SUNDAY, OCT. 29

WED., OCT.

25:

Beach Party Flicks-8 p.m., People's Plaza

THURS., OCT. 26: Pep Rally-7:30 p.m., Beta Theta Pi House
Sock Hop & Homecoming Queen Contest-
9 p.m., Union Ballroom

FRI., OCT.

27:

Phone Booth Stuffing & H

ula-Hoop Contest-

Win! A dRim!en RhBell/

1-3 p.m. on the Diag
SATE, OCT. 28: Tug ofWar-9a.m., Island Park
Mud Bowi-lO a. m.,SA House

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