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October 22, 1972 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-22

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

aunday, October ZZ, IV 72

THE MICHIGAN DAILY zunday, October LL, I '9/2

Egyptian
coup d'etat
defeated
BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) - Trav-
elers arriving from Cairo yester-
day said about 300 Egyptian army
fficers and soldiers were arrested
last week following an abortive at-
tempt to overthrow the govern-
ment of President Anwar Sadat.
The informant said the attempt-
ed coup was put down less than an
hour after it started. They report-
ed a brief fire fight near the Al
Hussein Mosque in the eastern I
outskirts of Cairo, but they had!
no word of any casualties.
The travelers said some diplo-
matic sources in Cairo had con-
firmed general information on the
attempted coup, but their ver-
sions differed in detail. Nothing
had been published in Cairo about
it.
The informants said rumors
about the coup attempt have cir-
culated in Cairo for more than a
week.
According to the reports brought
out yesterday, the attempted coup.
was timed for 5:30 p.m. Oct. 12,
the first Thursday night of the
holy month of Ramadan,' when
most of the Egyptian cabinet was
scheduled to attend evening pray-
ers at the Al Hussein mosque.
The British Broadcasting Corp.,
which also reported the coup at-
tempt, said the rebel officers were
protesting what was described as
Egypt's failureto wage full scale
war against Israel. The BBC re-
port said the rebels also object-
ed to Egypt's proposed union
with Libya.
An Egyptian army captain, orie
of the rebel leaders, was reported
to have harangued a crowd out-'
side Al Hussein mosque, denounc-
ing Sadat's close ties with LibyaI
and calling for war with Israel. He
was arrested.!
None of the reports reaching
Beirut gave the names of any
of the leaders. There was no indi-
cation of top-level involvement in
the coup attempt, or any mass sup-
port of it.
The reported plan was to strike
at three main targets - Sadat'sI
residence on the banks of the Nile
River, the Federation of Arab Re-
publics headquarters in suburban
Heliopolis, and the Al Hussein
mosque.

Japanese
e s'
still fight
on islands
LUBANG ISLAND, Philippines'
(P) - Two Japanese infantrymen,I
unaware that . World War II is
over, harassed the farmers andj
fishermen of this mountainous is-:
land for the past 26 years.
On Thursday, one of them was
killed in a firefight with five mem-
bers of the Philippine Constabu-
lary. His comrade was wounded
but escaped.
According to a constabulary pro-4
vincial commander, at least 30
Filipinos have been killed by Jap-
anese soldiers on the island 70
miles southwest of Manila since.
the end of the war. Scores of oth-

Maybe You
Can't Afford
Anyplace Else
We're student run so we've
got good food and live enter-
tainment-for less. Now we have
pinball and art prints too.
On the menu are Sunday
dinner s p e c i a 1 s, afternoon
snacks, and eggs and bacon.
We're open for breakfast and
I u n c h weekdays aF nd every
night 'till midnight. Friday and
Saturday nights until one.
Don't w a s t e your money;
come to the Church Street en-
trance in back of East Quad.
Special events calendars are in
your area, take a look at who
performs t o n i g h t. No cover
charge.
the halfway inn

WASH INGTON, D.C.
SUMMER INTERN PROGRAM
Sponored bv U-M Summer inern Proaram
Job in Conge sonal Offices,
Executive Agenc e , Lobbying Groups,
News Media
MASSMETING
THURSDAY
7:30 Oct. 26-Multipurpose Room, 3rd floor UGLI
HILLEL FOUNDATION AND MIDRASHA COLLEGE
OF JEWISH STUDIES
, present
"Diamonds In The Night"
A FILM AND LECTURE BY
ARNOST LUSTIG
Czech Writer and Filmmaker
Purged after the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia Lustig now
lives in the U.S. A prolific author, he has written plays, novels
and poetry. This movie won first prize at the 1964 Mannheim
Film Festival.
8 P.M., MONDAY, OCTOBER 23 HILLEL, 1429 HILL ST.
ADMISSION FREE

F,

2i

AP Photo
Fall h arvest
Farm workers harvest the hay in Ohio's Medina County os the autumn sun slips slowly past the
horizon.
CONSERVATIVES ATTACKED:
Blacks vow unity at meeti

I

CHICAGO (' - The first Black
National Assembly opened here
yesterday with a clenched-fist
display of unity and a pledge by
one organizer to fight what he
called a "new conservative coali-
tion."
More than 400 delegates began
the two-day gathering by joining
in the black power salute and
invoking the names of slain black
leaders Martin Luther Ling, Mal-
colm X and Medgar Evers in
vowing to "preserve, defend and
protect the black community."
"We are pressed, our patience
has its limit and we are being
threatened in many ways as we
have never been threatened be-

Mich.) told reporters before the
meeting.
Diggs said President Nixon's
fore," Rep. Charles Diggs (D-
appointments of conservatives to
the Supreme Court were exam-
ples of the "emergence of a
new conservative coalition" that
the assembly hoped to fight by
forming a structure for dealing
with political problems facing
blacks.
After the emotional opening of
the convention, the delegates
turned to procedural matters,
electing Diggs assembly presi-
dent.
The assembly is an outgrowth

of the 4,000-member Black Politi-
cal Convention held in Gary,
Indiana last March. The con-
vention nominated 10 per cent
of its body to the Black National
Assembly.
In a statement before t h e
group. Diggs said the Assembly
was "like a congressional body."
"it may endorse candidates,
support candidates, run national
voter education and registration
drives, lobby for black interests,
assess black progress, make re-
commendations to the national
convention and become a focal
point of black politics in the Uni-
Led States.'

...........

GALIIEJAkCQLES
PRESENT S

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN'

SUNDAY OCTOBER 22
DAY CALENDAR
Rive Gauche: volleyball game, 1024
Hill St., 4 'pm.
Music School: . De Put, piano, Bch.
of Mus. Recital Hall, 4:30 pm.
Music School: L. Guse, piano doc-
toral, Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall, 8 pm.!
University Players: "Endgame," Are-
na Theatre, Frieze Bldg., 8 pm.
MONDAY, OCTOBER 23
Environmental & Industrial Health
Seminar: Gilbert Kulick, Ofc. of En-
viron. Affairs, U. S. State Dept., "En-
vironment & Economic Development,"
Vaughan Aud., Sch. of Pub. Health I,
1 pm.
Psych 171 Film Series: "To Die To-

day," UGLI Multipurpose Rm.. 4 pm.
Physics Seminar: R. Adair, Yale, "The
KL3 Problem," P&A Colloquium Rm.,
-4 pm.
Inst. for Enxironmental Quality &
Sch. of Natural Resources: G. Kulick,
dfc. Environ. Affairs, State Dept., "The
U.S. in International Environmental
Affairs," 1040 Nat. Res., 4:15 pm.
Music School: C. Wheeler, oboe, SM
Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Rive Gauche: Chinese language
night, 1024 Hill St., 9 pm.
The Reading Improvement Service
will hold registration for Speed Read-
ing & Study Skills on Fri., Oct. 27,
1972. 8-12 a.m., 1-4 p.m. at 1610 Wash-
tenaw. The fee is $6.00.

Oct.
Oils 0 1 terveo!or *s 0Etcein.gs
2208 PACKARD
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
769-6787

u

J

FI RST AND OLDEST IN U.S
DRIVE IN FOR BEVERAGES
FOR PARTIES-PICNICS-OR HOME
JUST DRIVE THRU
303 N. FIFTH AVE., ANN ARBOR

r.

_ .,..

PSYCHOLOGY
UNDERGRAD ASSOCIATION
announces a general meeting
and election of officers
TUES., OCT. 23-8:00 at SGC office
3rd floor Michigan Union
Discussion and planning of our goals. Participation
on decision making in curriculum organizing infor-
mational services for psych undergrads.
This is your organization-help make it what you
want it to be.
IF YOU CAN'T COME TO THE MEETING LEAVE
YOUR NAME AND NUMBER AT OUR OFFICE-1542
STUDENT ACTIVITIES BLDG. AND WE WILL CON-
TACT YOU.

MON.-SAT, 9 to 12
SUNDAYS 12 to 12

668-8200

,
f illillillll N o i

Bea i abrexv.ak.
You're the only one who can.
Because all Smokey can do is ask you to help prevent forest fires.
He can't break your matches. Or douse your campfires. Or snuff out
your cigarets.
Only you can.
So, please, lend Smokey a hand.
And maybe while you're at it, lend him your voice too: tell people to
give the bear a break.
He deserves it.
So does America.

§ SWEATER
§ True cable sweaters from England, Scotland and Ireland:
The true cable adds a handsome third dimension to this
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Overbeck Bookstore
IS HAVING A
CLEARANCE.SALE
OF

MEDICAL-LAW and GENERAL BOOKS
25c and up
CURRENT AND OLD EDITIONS-NEW AND USED
AND
OFFICE AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES
50% OFF

Nan, km -' RMNEW 1111201FAY, I

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