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October 18, 1972 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1972-10-18

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Page Two

i I IE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesdoy October 18, 1972'

Page Two ii IE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesdoy, October 18, 1972

Industrial'
output
increases
WASHINGTON (R) - -In-
dustrial production continued
its steady upward push in
September, rising by 0.6 per
cent and* reflecting an im-
proving national economy,
the Federal Reserve Board
said yesterday.
The board said its index of in-
dustrial output, one of the na-
tion's most sensitive economic in-
dicators, went up to 115.5 per cent
last month,over the 1967 average,
making the index 7.6 per cent
higher than it was at this time
last year.
It was the largest gain in indus-
trial production since the 1.5 per
cent increase recorded in April.
In October a year ago the econo-
my began accelerating. The re-
covery has continued to the pres-
ent.
The index measures output of
factories, mines and utilties. In-
dustrial production has b e e n
strong in recent months. It went
up by an upward revised 0.7 per
cent in August.
At the Commerce Department
another report reflected a rising
economy. Personal income of
Americans rose $5.7 billion in Sep-
tember to a seasonally adjusted
annual rate of $945,7 billion. This
compared with a $7.1 billion in-
come rise in August.
Broken down, the September in-
come figures showed that wage
and salary payments made UPI
most of the increase, rising $4.2
billion. Although this figure was
high, it was below the August
gain of $4.9 billion.
Rising employment and, state
belt-tightening slowed the"na-
tional welfare growth rate to aI
rive-year low in fiscal 1972, theI
Department of Health, Education
and Welfare said.
C~t.'wt~tr> 'rx . U 1 C e... 4 n

S. Korean president
proclaims martial law
SEOUL (P) - President Chung Immediately after the proclama
flee Park proclaimed martial law tion, armed troops and armore
yesterday in South Korea, assert- vehicles moved into position aroun
ing that political parties could not i the parliament building. The on
be trusted to push unification talks house National Assembly was i
with Communist North Korea. recess and no lawmakers were in
In a surprise move, the former side.
four-star general dissolved the Na- After a quarter-century of hos
tional Assembly, suspended parts tility, the North and South Korea
of the 1962 constitution and clamp- rd
ed censorship on the domestic governments announced agreemen
press. He also closed all colleges in July to seek peaceful reunifica
and universities "for the time be- tion and avoid tension on the Koi
ing." ean peninsula. The agreement fo
He promised to restore constitu- lowed secret contacts between th
tional rule by the end of the year two governments.
'"at the latest." It was the third
time he has proclaimed martial Red Cross talks aimed at reunit
law since he took power in a blood- ing families separated byt27-year
less military coup 11 years ago. old partition of Korea are alread
In Washington, State Department under way.
spokesman Charles Bray said the
United States was "not consulted
l about the decision and quite ob-
k viously" is "not associated with
it."
Addressing the nation by radio, DIAL 668-6416
Park said he would propose con-
stitutional changes by Oct. 27 and ENDS WEDNESDAY
submit them to a referendum a ALFRED
month later. The charges, he said,
would permit South Korea to face HITCHCOCK'S
the transition from years of cold
war to the present atmosphere of "FRENZY"
detente which includes moves tow-
ards reunification with North Kor- AND-
ea. MICHAEL CAINE
Park said his measures would in
bring South Korea into line with "THE IPCRESS FILE"
present-day realities and "would be THURSDAY
best suited for backing up the ac-
tive pursuit of the South-North dia- EASY R I DER"
logue and for coping successfully AND
with the rapidly changing situation ELLIOT GOULD in
surrounding us." "GETTING STRAIGHT"
He accused the nation's political
parties of being "obsessed w it h
factional strife and discord" and
responsible for disorder and inef-
ficiency.
"The irresponsible political par-
ties already have lost the sense of
national mission and the represent-
ative institution was made the
scapegoat of their political strug-
gle," Park declared, referring to

a-
ed
nd
,e-
n
n-
is-
n
nt'
a-
ye
3y

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State lottery director Gus Harrison announced yesterday that
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.50 cent ticket.
GOVT. THREATENED:
Violence grows in Chile
as protest gains support

7& 9 P.M.

75c

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SANTIAGO {R) - Riot police
battled demonstrators with tear
gas yesterday in Santiago as
Chile's political conflict sharp-
ened and Communists warned
that the nation's leftist govern-

against the government of Marx-
ist President Salvador Allende.
Another Chilean province,
Aconcagua, just north of San-
tiago, was declared under a state
of emergency, a form of martial

a
t
$

Sligtly more than 15 minlion ment was threatened. law. Now 18 of 25 provinces, in-
persons were receiving welfare in Incidents of violence increased. cluding the capital, are subject
the year ending last June 30, a 5 The national truckers strike, to state of emergency restric-
per cent rise over the previous 12 which touched off the wave of tions.
months. antigovernment protest last week, Riot police fired dozens of tear
The total feder~al, state and lo gained support despite official gas canisters in downtown San-
warning that such action was tiago to break up opposing groups
cal welfare outlay was $18.2 bil- seditious. of Marxists and anti-Marxists.
lion, a 17.4 per cent increase. Luis Corvalen, secretary-gener- Rot trxisswnptith rsts
al of the Communist party in Riot trucks swept the streets
The Price Commission gave Chile, declared that a "civilian with high-presure streams >f war-
Chrysler Corp. and American Mq-, coup d'etat is in progress" er to disperse the demonstrators.
tors Corp. permission to raise -
prices.on their 1973 automobiles to
cover the cost of government-re- UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
quired safety and pollution equip- WEDNESDAY-$ATURDAY
ment. WDESA -ATRA
The ruling means that ChryslerR)
can raise prices on 1973 models by
an estimated $60.10 per car while 9:30-2:00
American can boost the price of!
its cars by an estimated $144.28,
of which $75.90 is for federally 208 W. Huron
mandated safety and emission
control equipment. LUNCHES DAILY

the assembly.

I

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phere. Slides of Israel will be shown.
THURSDAY, OCT. 19-7 P.M.
936 DEWEY (Off Packard)
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Theatre Phone 642-626441
OPEN 12:45
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DIAL 5-6290
"**** 4 STARS,
HIGHEST RATING!"
N.y. Daily News

COMPLETELY DIFFERENT7
IS A CAVALCADE OF
INSANITY!"
-WCrRMANNVw:
ot
riy9e o e e
LAUGH-IN s e
Atg ti {NtaS" ° d k
--W BN-V s0:(i { lO sa n

i

"'
BR

"MARX BROS. ZANINESS! Lives up to its
taie Cmi kners and nlid keI ylanahs!"

1

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