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October 14, 1972 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-14

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Saturdoy, October 14, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

SatudayOctoer 1, 192 TH MICIGANDAIL
Tm U

r
(RADIO KING "
r Hr 1 ISirv
COUtO IRTH 1
217SASH 2PAM-2AM
This KOeaKMP
$2.00
Evelyne Boors
& her family
(Eric & Martha Nagler) j
fiddle, bluegrass & oldtime
banjo, guitar, & psaltery
SUNDAY-
Stefan
Grossman
2.00
(formerly of the EVEN
DOZEN JUG BAND)
1421 Hill STitET

IUILD
SATURDAY
An early example of the work
of one of the most admired
modern directors. With Maria
Cosraes who is a fascinatingy
actress (unforgettable for any-
one who has seen her as the
Death of Orpheus in Cocteau's
film.)
WOMEN IN
THE DARK
(Les Dames des Bois du Boulogne)
Dir. Robert Presson 1944
SUNDAY
by the. same director
La Femme Douce
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7 & 9p.m. 75C
UAC presents
the world's largest
Multi-Media Show
THE
BEATLES,
AWAY WITH
WORDS

T-ymusicr
The Stanley Quartet!".

By DONALD SOSIN
The Stanley Quartet's concert
in Rackham Thursday night was
notable for a number of reasons.
With the switch from string
quartet to piano quartet, this
marks the first time the Univer-
sity has had such an ensemble in
residence. The variety of works
that can be performed by the
group is thus greatly expanded.
If Thursday's program is any
indication, we may expect per-
formances of string trios, piano

trios, as well as quartets utiliz-
ing all the members of the en-
semble.
Opening with Beethoven's Trio
in C minor, Op. 9, No. 3, string
players Edwin Grzesnikowski,
Robert Courte, and Jerome Jeli-
nek, of the School of Music Fac-
ulty, performed with the sensi-
tivity to ensemble that one has
come to expect from their past
performances in the string quar-
tet. Unhappily, there was also a
good deal of slippery intonation;

theatre- ---
Lear at Stratford

By JIM KENTCH
"0 golden tongued romance
with serene lute! Fair plumed
jsiren! Queen of faraway!"
though John Keats as he sat
down to read King Lear once
again.
If Keats had seen the produc-
tion of thishShakespearean trag-
' dy as it is currently being pre-
gented by the Stratford Festival
Players, his praise would have
been almost limitless. All ele-
ments unite to create an intense
self-sustaining production.
The cast, with few exceptions,
had complete mastery of their
roles in last Thursday's produc-
tion. William Hutt as Lear was
''every inch a king;" his tirades
and gesticulations captured the
essence of the mad octogener-
ian.
When he stumbles up the steps

Read and

Use

Daily Classifieds

I

DIRECT FROM ITS
HIGHLYACCLAIMED
SHOWING AT THE
CANNES FILM
FESTIVAL!
CITY
John Huston's most
powerful picture in
years! The surprise
hit of this year's
Cannes Film Festival!"
-CHARLES CHAMPLIN.
L.A. Times
"John Huston has
directed it master-
fully. A work of solid
and effective realism!"
-THOMAS QUINN CURTISS,
International Herald Tribune
"The work of a great film-
maker with a great heart!"
-ROBERT CHAZAL.
France Sae
"It is John Huston's
best in many a year!
The sensation of the
Cannes Festival,
unanimously ac-
claimed. Directed with
such beauty, truth and
humanity...it is a tran-
scendent experience!"
-BERNARD DREW. Gnnett News Se'ce
"Perhaps the best film
-seen at Cannes!"
-DEREK PROUSE. Sunday Times (London)

I

Four (4) Performances
WED., OCT. 18
8 P.M. and 10 P.M.
THURS., OCT. 19
8P.M. and 10PM
POWER
AUDITORIUM
Advance tickets available at:
Centicore Bookstore
The Music Mart
The Michigan Union

CHRRLIE
CHRPLIN
"The powerful deflating
force of Chaplin's
comedy at its peak!"
-Newsweek
"Gloriously Funny!
Another work of
art from the master."
-William Wolf, Cue
c1 S
#\EAV

and refuses help, Lear is pa-
thetic. When the Fool hands him
his whip, a perverted symbol of
his once powerful scepter, he is
frustrated and befuddled. And
when he overturns the dinner ta-
bles, at Goneril's, his wrath
knows no temporal bounds.
Edward Atienza as The Fool
was the perfect foil to Lear. His
antics, distorted dances and
puns provided a needed comic
relief,
Edmund, however, played by
Barry McGregor, was self-con-
scious in his soliliquies. Kenneth
Welsh as Edgar overplayed his
role, especially as the mad Tom
O' Bedlam.
And Kent, who is supposedly a
character in his late forties,
looks about 70 in this production
with his white hair and small
stature.
The lighting and sound effects
added greatly to the dramatic
intensity. When Lear, hands up-
raised in a supplication to the
heavens, first appears on the
heath in the storm, he is accom-
panied by a strobe-flash light-
ning bolt and a huge clap of
thunder. The effect is like wit-
nessing full - armored Athena
springing from the head of Zeus.
Stratford's modern, electroni-
fied musical accompaniament,
was, however, somewhat harm-
ful to the play's intensity. The
trumpets were anemic, and the
drums hardly appropriate to pre-
Christian Albion.
The play gains its effective-
ness from the high priority given
to realism. When Gloucester is
blinded, his bloodied eyes fall
out onto the stage. Lighted torch-
es, authentic fights with real me-
tal swords), falls, and garbage
all appear on the stage. And
when Goneril kills one of her
servants with an axe, it sticks
(a la Hollywood) in his back.
The simple, functional Strat-
ford stage united the actors and
audience. Edmund and Edgar
fight in the aisle, and you can
see the spittle as Regan spits
into Cornwall's face.
The setting of the Stratford
Theater would certainly please
the Bard himself. Surrounded by
a large park, it overlooks Lake
Victoria and its swans. Lake
Victoria, of course, on the Avon
River.
King Lear will be presented in
Stratford until October 21. It's
a four hour drive, but it's a dif-
ferent country and well worth the
trip.
DIAL 5-6290
"**** 4 STARS
HIGHEST RATING"
N.Y. Daly News
.v..
BUTTERFIJEE
ARE FREE
GOLDE MWN
ElFJ I(4ECkRRR
Shows at 1-3-5-7-9:05 p.m.

after three seasons of this, I
have become resigned to it, and
go to the Stanley's concerts not
so much for highly polished play-
ing as for the individual works-
the quartet has a history of di-
verse and interesting programs,
and has commissioned numerous
works in its 24 year existence.
The new member of the group
is Benning Dexter, chairman of
the School of Music piano depart-
ment. He joined Grzesnikowski
and Jelinek for the Ann Arbor
premiere of Ross Lee Finney's
Trio No. 2 (1955). Typical of the
composer's prolific output of
chamber music, the trio is lyric-
al and witty, and contains some
beautifully ethereal moments;
one hones Ann Arbor won't have
to wait another 17 years for a
second performance.
Faure's Piano Quartet in C
minor, Op. 15, has been unheard
on this campus for about the
same amount of time, according
to one faculty member. While it
is true that the availability of
recordings has made the issue of
live performance a less pressing
one, still there is no substitute
for live chamber music. Before
the advent of records, it was
common for amateur musicians
to gather and read through trios
or quartets for sheer enjoy-
ment. It seems as though this
practice h-s almost died out-
amateurs have turned to folk
and rock, and professionals, in
today's highly competitive at-
mosphere, spend a large amount
of time practicing, leaving little
time for recreation.
So it was good to hear musi-
cians gutting their energies into
a work like the Faure, reward-
ing in its turn-of-the-century ro-
manticism; the joy in making
such music is not easily contain-
ed, and overflowed the Rackham
stage, enveloping the audience,
which was curiously almost de-
void of music majors. After a
long day out at North Campus,
the Stanley Quartet is a gentle
reminder that music is enter-
tainment, not just a gig.

By STEVE POTTER
Debka Habir, Troika, Pajdu-
ska, Gankino, Mayim . . . A
heated conversation between an
Israeli and a Bulgarian? No, not
quite. These strange-sounding
words are just the names of just
a few of the dances seen every
Friday evening in Barbour Gym-
nasium.
The dancing starts about eight
o'clock and continues straight
through until eleven. Everyone
is welcome.
Folk dancing, by its very na-
tra. is a pleasant and relaxing
social activity. It gives people
an onportinity to experience a
physical closeness with others
(in a commrnnmal sense), which is
at times lacking in our society.
Perbars thn apoe-l of these
Fridav evening folk dances is
also heightened by the fact that
the onlu cost is a rewnested 25c
don'tion. Whatever the appeal
mqv be, somethina's working,
becavse early fall Fridays have
seen n fill gym of enthusiastic
dancers.
Beginners need not feel at all

hesitant to come because at this
time in the fall most of the peo-
ple are new anyway. To help the
beginners, the dances are taught
for the first hour and a half-
the last hour and a half being re-
served for the more advanced
dances. Besidesinot being a
varsity sport, skill and perfec-
tion is not what folk dancing
is all about. As instructor Dennis
Regan says, "It is not the steps
that are so important, but the
people with whom you are danc-
ing." This general tone of gen-
ialty pervades the entire atmos-
phere.
The folk-dancing group has
been active locally for about
eight years and is now organiz-
ed and instructed by a group of
about six enthusiasts who have
been working with it for about
five years. Although it might
seem that an ethnic background
in the culture of these dances
might be a prerequisite, it is not.
For as the group's treasurer
Kathy Wilson says, "We're al-
most all hodge-podge Ameri-
cans."
The music, perhaps above all,
is what really sets the mood of
the dances. Most of the time,
records are used, but from time
to time, a folk dance band will
make a cameo appearance. This

band has several of the tradi-
tional instruments such as the
accordion, tambourine, violin,
flute, and drums. Eventually,
they would alo like to add on a
guida (a bagpipe) and a frula
(a flute-like ethnic instrument).
.The different dances them-
selves have a great effect. on
the atmosphere. The Balkan
dances are most popular, ac-
cording to Wilson, because of
their unusual beats and har-
monies (often they are one-note
harmonies). In contrast to the
Balkan dances, however, a polka
will immediately change the at-
mosphere to one of frivolity. The
Israeli, Scandinavian, and Rus-
sian dances are also popular
The Troika, a Russian dance, is
done in sets of three, and means
literally "Three Horses."
In the past, the group has
also sponsored special dance
workshops in which they have a
professional come in and instruct
over a three-day period. They
are continuing with them this
fall, and their first one - a Ma-
cedonian Dance Workshop - is
planned for November 10, 11,
and 12. There are also Advanc-
ed and Intermediate classes
which meet every Tuesday eve-
ning in the Women's Athletic
Building.

I

CUJLTURE _CA\!ENIDAR;

Daily Photo by TOM GOTTLIEB

Folk dancers in action

INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
Step to a different drummer

CONCERTS - Folksinger
Gordon Lightfoot comes to
the University of Detroit
Memorial Bldg. tonight at
8:30. Tickets available at U
of D box office and all J. L.
Hudson ticket outlets.

ARTS

I am trying
to bribe you
with
}uncertainty,
with
dan.ger,
with
def eat.
9,$, ..orge
luis
borges
That's mostly what you'll
find if you commit your
life to the millions in the
Third World who cry out
in the hunger of their
hearts. That...andfulfill-
ment too.. .with the
4COLUMBAN
FATHERS
Over 1,000 Catholic mission-
ary priests at work mainly in
the developing nations.
We've been called by many
names -"foreign dogs"..
"hope-makers" . .. "ca.pital-
ist criminals".. "hard-nosed
realists"...
Read the whole story in our
new
FREE 6-PGE
BOOKLET
Tells it
like
it is
Columban Fathers
St. Columbans, Neb. 68056
Please send me a copy of your
booklet. No strings.

.

i

rT

wi, 10
PAULETTE GODDRRD
JACK OAKIE
Written,Directed and Produced
by Charles Chaplin
Released through Columbia Pictures
now thru tuesday
WEEKDAYS-7:00, 9:10
SAT., SUN.-12:45, 2:45,
4:50, 7:00, 9:10
Wed.-"AND NOW
FOR SOMETHING
COMPLETELY DIFFERENT"
SOON-"The Ruling Class"

DRAMA-University Players present Farquhar's The Beaux
Strategem in Mendelssohn tonight at 8; Wayne State
University features Kurt Vonnegut's Happy Birthday,
Wanda June tonight at the Bonstelle Theatre at 8:30;
Marygrove College presents One Flew Over the Cuckoo's
Nest tonight at 8:30 in the college's theatre; Meadow-
brook Theatre presents The Front Page tonight.
FILM SPECIAL-In a benefit showing for the Media Access
Center, Jean Luc Godard and Jean Pierre Gorin's Tout
Va Bien will be shown continuously today in Aud. A, An-
gell Hall. The directors will speak tonight in Power
Center at 8. Tickets, good for both film and speech,
available at Centicore, So. University.
FILMS-Cinema Guild presents Bresson's Les Dames Du Bois
de Bolonge, Arch Aud. tonight at 7, 9:05; Cinema II fea-
tures Hitchcock's Dial M for Murder at 7, 9 tonight. Aud.
A, Angell Hall; If at 9 tonight in Bursley Hall's West
Cafeteria.
MUSIC-The Beers Family tonight at the Ark; University
Bands present Maynard Ferguson with his All English
Jazz Band tonight in Hill Auditorium; Detroit and Flack
perform tonight at 8 in the People's ballroom; Live en-
tertainment at the Rive Gauche.
WEEKEND BARS AND MUSIC-Bimbo's, Gaslighters (Fri.,
Sat., Sun.) cover; Bimbo's on the Hill, Long John Silver
(Fri., Sat.) cover; Blind Pig. Boopie Brothers (Fri.,
Sat.) cover, classical music (Sun.) no cover; Del Rio,
Armando's Jazz Group (Sun.) no cover; Golden Falcon,
Stanley Mitchell and the People's Choice (Fri., Sat.)
cover; Lum's, RFD Boys, cover; Mackinac Jack's Radio
King and his Court of Rhythm (Fri., Sat.) cover; Mr.
Fleod's Party, Terry Tate (Fri., Sat.) cover; Odyssey,
The Rockets (Fri., Sat.) cover, jam night (Sun.) no
cover; Rubaiyat, Iris Bell Adventure (Fri., Sat., Sun.) no
cover.
ART-The Union Gallery, first floor Union, opens its doors
this afternoon between 12 and 5.
UPCOMING CONCERT TIP-Grand Funk Railroad perform
at Cobo Hall tomorrow night.
* * *
Information concerning happenings to be included in
Culture Calendar should be sent to the Arts Editor, c/o The
Daily.

On the front page

By JONATHAN MILLER
Feature Editor
With an audience of over 140
media people - and 300 of De-
troit's best dressed people, The
Front Page, Meadowbrook's first
offering of the season, got off to
a resounding start Thursday
night.
A jazzy accountofthe tumul-
tuous newspaper wars in 1920's
Chicago, Ben Heck's play was
immediately appealing to the
predominately media - oriented
audience.
The film version entitled His
Girl Friday, more familiar to
most people, has become a
classic of newspaper films, part-
ly because of the skillful adap-
tation of thestage play to a
screen play and mostly because
of superb acting by Rosiland
Russel and Cary Grant.
The Front Page at Meadow-
brook lacks much of the polish of
the film: the dialog is not as
quick and some of the acting is
spotty.
Buteven if the stage version
at Meadowbrook is not up to
tevo
tonight
6:00 2, 4, 7 News, Weather, Sports
9 This is Your Life
50 Star Trek
56 Thirty Minutes With
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 Safari to Adventure
9 Beachcombers
56 Just Generation
7:00 Truth or Consequences
4 Explorers
7 Michigan Outdoors
9 Movie-"Georgy Girl" (1966)

film standards it remains, none-
theless, a tremendously enter-
taining comedy.
Unfortunately, Jim Oyster's
portrayal of Hildy Johnson is one
of the weakest parts in the dra-
ma. Oyster seems almost effem-
inate in his role, not at all the
swashbuckling newspaperman of
yesteryear that one would have
expected in the role.
But almost everyone else in
the play is suberb. Special laur-
els must go to LeRoy Kalbas,
who played the part of Cook
County's inept and corrupt sher-
iff, and William LeMassena who
acts the part of the Examiner's
city editor.
The acting of the secondary
players and the construction of
the set are also praiseworthy.
The stage management is slick
and well executed.
If you've got a car and don't
mind the one-hour trek to Ro-
chester, The Front Page may
well be the highlight of your
weekend.- You don't even have to
be a journalist to appreciate it.
7 Streets of San Francisco
9 Document
56 On Location
9:30 2 Bob Newhart
10:00 2 Mission: Impossible*
7 Sixth Sense
9 CBC News
56 VD Blues
50 Lou Gordon
10:15 9 News
10:30 9 East Side/West Side
11:00 2, 7 News, Weather, Sports
56 Operation Venus
11:30 2 Movie-"My Six Loves." (1963)
A Broadway star adopts six or-
phans. Debbie Reynolds.
4 News, Weather, Sports
7 Movie-"Sylvia" (1965) Story
about a beautiful poetess with
a dark past.
9 Movie-"Elephant walk" (1954)
Young English bride cannot
adjust to life on her husband's
tea plantation in Ceylon. Eliza-
beth Taylor, Dana Andrews,

0 0 0

Recom-
mended
for
Adults!

I

-Benefit for the Media Access Center-
sponsored by Friends of Newsreel
prior to its U.S. premiere at
the SAN FRANCISCO FILM FESTIVAL

STACY KEACH
JEFF BRIDGES
SUSAN TYRREL in
"FAT CITY"
NOW SHOWING NIGHTLY
AT 7&9P.M.

Jane Fonda

Yves Montand

IN

TOUT VA BEEN
(EVERYTH I NG'S O.K.)
continuous showings 2-4-6-8-10 p.m.

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