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October 11, 1972 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1972-10-11

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Wednesday, October 11, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, October 11, 1972 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

UNDER NEW MANAGEMENT
TONIGHT and THURSDAY:
MOJO BOOGIE BAND
9:30-2:00
FRIDAY and SATURDAY:
ROCKETS (John Bidanchet & Jime Macardi)
9:30-2:00
208 W. Huron
LUNCHES DAILY
.... :. .

Beryozka:

Spectacular

By DONALD SOSIN
Beryozka Dance Company, Nadezh-
da Nadezhdina, Artistic Director.
Tuesday, October 10, 8:00 p.m.
Power Center; Choice Series of the
University Musical Society.
There are those that believe
that folk dancing is fine as a
participatory activity, buthas no
business being made into a spec-
RETURN OF:

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Ftg"1D
ykeur of;:

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WOODY ALLEN'S
"Everything
you always
wanted to know
about sex*
*BUT WERE AFRAID TO ASK 9
WOODY ALLEN. JOHN CARRADINE -LOU JACOBi
TONY RANDALL'LYNN REDGRAVE"BURT REYNOLDS

The Best of
the First
Annual
N.Y. Erotic
Film Festival

tator sport. The New York Times
dance critic Clive Barnes said as
much in a recent review of the
Beryozka Dance Company, and
went on to make some sour re-
marks about all folk music and
the company as well. Unfortun-
ately, one learned very little
about the troupe from his article,
gaining only an impression of Mr.
Barnes' petty prejudices. Such
misuse of power in a major news-
paper is injurious both to the per-
formers and to the field of criti-
cism.
Perhaps I am less sophisticated
than Mr. Barnes, and perhaps
the Ann Arbor audience is not
as sensitive to the fine points of
folk dance; in any event, the
packed crowd at the theater last
night enjoyed itself immensely,
the dancers seemed to be having
a good time, and this reviewer
was laughing and applauding as
much as he has for any spectacu-
lar he can remember-so phooey
on Mr.cBarnes, and cheers for
folk dancing and the Beryozka
Dance Company.
The program was made up of

elaborately choreographed num-
bers that reflected dance styles
in various parts of the U.S.S.R.
We saw peasant round-dances
and the well-known heel-kicking
Cossack dances as well as grace-
ful pieces that seemed to have
less to do with actual dancing
than with a display of costumes
and imaginative patterns.
The opening dance featured
fifteen women in floor-length red
gowns, carrying the birch leaves
from which the group gets its
name. They glided across the
stage, seeming to be on a turn-
table, as their feet moved in-
visibly under their dresses. The
effect was stunning and pro-
voked the first of many bursts
of applause during the evening.
Following this, men and wom-
en joined in a competition dance
that contained a lot of spinning
and jumping, as the men tried
to outdo each other. Gasps of
delight were endless, especially
in the next dance. The women,
imitating the threading of a
needle, swayed in a line across
the stage and suddenly parted

Sovieis!
to reveal the men, who had
magically appeared (through the
upstage curtain) without being
noticed. Such touches were fre-
quent, and greatly appreciated.
A Siberian suite made the
high point of the evening. Be-
ginning quietly as the men tried
to entice the girls to dance, it
soon developed into a bear-hunt,
complete with bear, who was the
hit of the show, clowning with the
audience, performing comical
acrobatics, playfully kicking the
men and hugging the women,
and generally stealing the spot-
light from the tour-de-force leap-
ing and whirling that went on
around him.
A lighting malfunction marred
the opening of the second half,
but was soon corrected, and the
remainder of the program, gen-
erally more subdued than before,
closed with a flashy Cossack
dance.
High praise also goes to cos-
tume designer Liubov Silich, and
the unseen musicians backstage
who kept a lively pace under
their conductor, Albert Ryzhkin.

CUU CALENDAR
UPCOMING CONCERT TIP-Folksinger Gordon Lightfoot
comes to University of Detroit Memorial Bldg. this
Saturday at 8:30. Tickets available at U of D box office
and all J. L. Hudson ticket outlets.
DRAMA-George Farquahr's Restoration comedy The Beaux'
Stratagem opens tonight in Lydia Mendelssohn as the
first offering of this season's University Players' Playbill
series. The play runs through Saturday. Tickets available
at Mendelssohn box office.
FILM-The Psych. 171 Film Series shows High School today
at 4 in the UGLI Multi-purpose Room. Ann Arbor Film
Co-op offers The King of Hearts at 7 and 9:30 in Aud. A,
Angell Hall. Daily reviewer Sheldon Leemon has this to
say about the film: "Rarely do we find a movie about
war which is simple, humane, and charming, but such a
movie is The King of Hearts. When a French town is
evacuated in World War I, inmates of the insane asylum
come out to live their twisted, amusing, and basically
harmless fantasies, while around them nations are living
' out their twisted, distasteful, and massively destructive
fantasies. The quiet, unassuming manner in which the
theme progresses sets up the audience for a stunning,
brilliant finish." Cinema Guild shows Orson Welles'
Immortal Story at the Arch. Aud. at 7 and 9:05.
MUSIC-The Univ. Musical Society presents the Beryozka
Dance Company tonight at the Power Center at 8.

Limited 2 Week Engagement
STARTS TOMORROW

cinema
So, what's the connection?

ARTS

,,

FRI.-SAT., Oct. 13-14
7:30-9-10:30 p.m.
NAT. SCI. AUD.
$1.25 cont.
FRIENDS OF NEWSREEL
Midwest premiere: Dec. 8-9
NY EROTIC FILM FESTIVAL II
Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558

By LARRY LEMPERT
We o p e n w i t h compelling
rhythms, sharp whites and blues,
intriguing patterns of movement.
Unfortunately, this is the "where
the action is" skiing short sub-
ject, not the main feature. Next
comes a cartoon which manages
to vary the "Tom and Jerry,
Wolf-Roadrunner" theme only by
substituting a snake and a Japa-
nese beetle who uses karate and
hums Gilbert and Sullivan.
The downhill trend has been
established and, sure enough,
The Salzburg Connection carries
the trend to fruition.
Its failure is understandable.

With television swamping the ac-
tion movie genre with entries
every week, only a skillful ex-
ploitation of screen qualities and
techniques can bring viewers
anything they can't find on their
set at home (especially if they
have a color TV).
One can imagine, for example,
watching The French Connection
on television. But, the force of
its violence (for better or worse),
the skillfulness of its editing, the
speed of its movements and the
impact of certain images would
certainly be lost on the house-
holder periodically interrupted by
commercials.

poetry and prose-
Winter strikes early

SHOWS DAILY At 1 P.M.:4:30-8 P.M.
Pass List and Bargain Day Suspended for
"Fiddler On The Roof"
CHILDREN $1.00
ADULTS
Mon.-Sat. Matinee $2.00
Eve. and All Day
Sunday $2.50 Program Informat

ion 662-6264

By ROB HORWITZ
As I drifted from the UGLI
after Walter Clark's poetry read-
ing yesterday afternoon, I was
startled-awoken as if out of a
trance-by the crisp evening air
tinged by a steadily unrushing
winter. Professor Clark's poetry,
much of which was composed
during his year's leave 'of ab-
sence on a Fullbright scholarship
in Austria, seemed to reflect this
contrast.
His first five poems, presum-
ably written during his leave,
were extremely smooth, polished
pieces-sensitive, as every good
poet's work should be, to the
most minute detail of the scenes
described. And yet, they seemed
to be narrated from a somewhat
detached point of view.
Snow everywhere
In the Stadtpark,
Chestnut trees
In white pajamas,
Pigeons stooping from boughs
Like sinister fruit.

Single Tickets On Sale Now

home.
As back from complicated Troy
Ulysses comes
His old dog wakes in him
only the portal of a fact.
Leaping away from this serene,
reflective sensibility, Clark mov-
ed to some of his old favorites.
New Yorkers, "an unfinished
poem which I'll read anyway
because I like the beginning,"
raucously rolled through the
room amidst occasional bursts of
laughter from the audience.
For the most, born,
Some are made, painfully.
A born one never looks back,
His voice carries him like a flag
To the ends of the airways;
D~itches of Venice
Are only spokes to his wheel.
MANAHATTAN!
He wears its streets on his sleeve,
Its song up his nose.
His "old stuff" is filled with
these exciting, sometimes ludi-
crous, always quite alive and
actively present moments. Pro-
fessor Clark, as you have said
yourself in one of your poems:
"Winter is no/Time for artists."
This critic must agree.

Unlike The French Connection,
The Salzburg Connection relies
almost entirely upon its plot.
This would have been disastrous
in The French Connection and
the result her'e, if not disastrous,
is at least unfortunate.
Nothing beyond the standard
machismo and a dash of patriot-
ism motivates a handsome and
heroic lawyer (Barry Newman)
to spice up his vacation with a
bit of international intrigue, on
behalf of the leading lady in dis-
tress (Anna Karia). A multitude
of agents appear - the blonde
lure, the young toughs and
others; they look sinister, search
for clues, follow people, get' kill-
ed, or any combination of the
above. The agents represent a
wide assortment of nations and
intelligence groups, but the view-
er is never sure (and, it might
be added, never really cares)
who represents whom.
The film-makers have sprinkled
their product with as much sus-
pense as they can muster.
Where is the mysterious MISS-
ING CHEST? What in THE
CHEST could be-so valuable as
to justify the murder of six peo-
ple?
Well, most movie-goers enjoy
suspense, even when it is arti-
ficially induced by obvious tech-
niques (a la Hitchcock, in many
of his films). But when the sus-
pense fizzles into an impracti-
cality, when the whole basis for
the plot turns out to be so im-
probable-it's a bit of a disap-
pointment. (Boy, wait 'til you
see what's in that chest-you'll
probably demand your money
back.)
The plot's suspense is nothing
compared to the real question of
the movie. The real question:
When is the car chase? The real
answer: About two-thirds of the
way through, and it's embarrass-
ingly inferior to chases in Bullitt,
Diamonds Are Forever, The
French Connection, and even to
one on the NBC Mystery Movie
several weeks ago.

By MADELINE TRIFFON
No, it's not just a little old
man who locks himself in the
bell tower to entertain us with
splendid renderings of San Fran
cisco "Be sure to wear flowers
in your hair.
Burton Tower houses a legiti-
mate musician named Hudson
Ladd - the University Carillon-
eur who presented a program of
carillon music this past sum-
mer, featuring distinguished in-
ternational performers.
The 25 recitals, which opened
early in May and ended earlier
this month, included carillon-
neurs from France, Belgium,
Holland and the United States.
Ladd plans a similar series for
next spring.
The carillon, an instrument
consisting of over 23 tuned bells,
came here 36 years ago. Its
unique size and weight - Bur-
ton's carillon weighs 100 tons -
t.v.
t 0
tonight
6:00 2, 4, 7 News, Weather, Sports
9 Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones-Children
56 Maggie and the Beautiful
Machine
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
9 Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
7 ABC News
56 Making Things Grow
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News, Weather Sports
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Pro Hockey
50 I Love Lucy
56 Zoom
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Family Classics
7 Wild Kingdom
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Consumer Game
8:00 Carol Burnett
4 Adam 12
7 Paul Lynde
56 A Public Affair/Election '72
50 Dragnet

r

These
lonely,

BURTON CARILLON

100 tons of chimes

first poems are cold,
longing - perhaps for

-I

eliminated the Michigan Union
and Angell Hall successively a.
possible installation sites. Bur-
ton Tower was finally built for.
the primary purpose of housing
the carillon.
Full university credit is given
to c-rillon 'students whom Ladd
teaches personally. If you're in-
terested, you must be in the
School of Music and will be ac-
cepted into the program at
Ladd's discretion. He insists that
"they must have a thorough ac
quaintance with the piano key-
board." Ladd's students are
permitted to play the "real
thing" after plenty of practice
on a model carillon.
Hudson Ladd is a member of
the Guild of Carillonneurs and
became the University's carilon-
neur in residence on July 1,
1972.
(Incidentally, no one rushfs
up every 30 minutes to ring the
time. It's done automatically.)
killed her husband and whether
he was on the take.
50 Merv Griffin
56 Playhouse New York
9:00 2 Medical Center
9:30 9 Bandwagon
10:00 2 Cannon
4 search
7 Julie Andrews
9 News, Weather, sports
50 Perry Mason
56 Soul!
10:20 9 Nightbeat
11:00 2, 4, 7 News, Weather, Sports
9 Cheaters
50 Mancini Generation
11:30 2 Movie-"Charlie Chan in Bono-
lulu" (1938)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Dick Cavett
9 Movie-"Strategy of Terror"
(1967) UN assassination plot
uncovered by journalist and
dying man.
50 Move-"Watusi" (1959) remake
of H. Rider Haggard safari
classic.
1:00 4, 7 News
1:30 2 Movie-"Man'Bait" (1952)
Bookstore manager suspected
in murder of one of his
clerks.
3:00 2 News
Correction
The Daily says "We're sorry"
for some mistaken profit figures
which appeared in Tuesday's re-
view of the Cheech and Chong
concert. Cheech and Chong made
$4,500 and The Persuasions made
$1,000, while UAC-Daystar made
only $400 and Project Comnu-
nity made only $300.
Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
drama, dance, film,
poetry, and music,
or writing. feature
stories about the
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, C/o The
Michigan Daily.

FRANK WILKINSON
from the National Committee Against
Repressive Legislation
SPEAKING ON:
"Civil Liberties View
of the Nixon Court"

Perhaps, like Diamonds Are
Forever, The Salzburg Connec-
tion is meant to be parody itself.
If so, parody is veiled with
definite genius. No, the film ad-
vertised as "the suspense ad-
venture of the year" is appar-
ently meant to be just that. Ac-
tually, it will probably be the
suspense adventure of next year,
when it appears where it be-
longs-on television.

3:30 P.M.-THURSDAY
LAWYER'S CLUB LOUNGE

I

I

benefit for the
Media Access Center
sponsored by
Friends of Newsreel
prior to its U.S. premiere at the
SAN FRANCISCO FILM FESTIVAL

1

8:30 4
7

Banacek
Movie-"Lieutenant Schuster's
Wife" (1972) Cop's widow fran-
tically tries to find out who

DELTA SIGMA DELTA

r

DELTA SIGMA DELTA
Dental Fraternity
T.G.
FRI., OCT. 13
7 p:m.
1502 Hill, Ann Arbor
LIVE BAND
REFRESHMENTS

Jane Fonda

Yves Montand

IN
TOUT VA BIEN
(Everything's O.K.)
plus: short film, "Letter to Jane"

I

2-4-6-8-10 p.mr SATURDAY

Oct. 14

$2.50 benefit cont.

00..
Imaline ~l*A1 as o f Tvrolean

Aud. A
meet with the directors-8 p.rr

. II

I

U x~." ~; . .,

I

I

II

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