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October 11, 1972 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1972-10-11

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday; October 11, 1972

P~.ge Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday1 October 1 1, 1972

Court
Ohio

rules o
private

n aid toMEET THE UM BARBERS
Chet, Dave, Harold& Jay
8:30a.m.-5:15 p.m.
Mon. -Sat.
students MICHIGAN UNION

NOTICE
Jobs are available ...
For FREE information on
student assistance a n d
placement program send
self-addressed STAMPED
envelope to the National
Placement Registry, 1001
East Idaho St., Kalispelle,
Mt. 59901.
- -NO GIMMICKS--

t

AP Photo
Nixon meets Griffin
Sen. Robert Griffin (R.Mich.) checks notes with President Nixon during a meeting yesterday in the
White House. Nixon met with Griffin and four other antibusing senators, after the latest antibusing
bill received a serious setback in the Senate. (See related story on this page).
UAW COMPLAINS:
I tomakers charged with
UIexist e.,Mployment pracI-tices

WASHINGTON (P) - An Ohio
law defraying some expenses for
sending children to church-run
schools was struck down yester-
day by the Supreme Court.
The 8 - 1 decision may indi-
cate that any system of aiding
parents of parochial children
could find disfavor in the high
court.
However, the justices did not
issue a full-blown opinion de-
tailing their views, and the Ohio
reimbursement approach is only
one of several being taken by var-
ious states to assist in the edu-
cation of private school children.
The 1971 Ohio law provided
$90 a year to some 300,000 famil-
ies to reimburse them for books,
laboratory fees, bus fares a n d
other expenses of sending their
children to private schools about
95 per cent of them Roman
Catholic.
Last April, a three-judge fed-
eral panel in Columbus held the
law to be in violation of the
FirstAmendment's prohibition on
government aid to religion. Cit-
ed by the panel was an 8-1 de-
cision by the Supreme court last
year that Pennsylvania and.
Rhode Island may not reimburse
church-related schools for in-
struction in nonreligious subjects.
Ohio appealed, claiming its law
was markedly different. For one
thing, the state said, the funds
are paid to the parents and not
the schools.
But the Supreme Court simply
affirmed the lower court's ruling,
without even pausing for a hear-
ing. Justice Byron White dissent-
ed.
Ohio has since passed another
law providing tax credits for par-
ents of private school children.
That law is being tested current-
ly in a federal district court.
The Nixon administration is
supporting a bill in Congress to
allow such taxpayers to reduce
their federal income tax pay-
ments.
David Young, counsel for Ohio's
six Catholic dioceses, declined to
comment on yesterday's ruling.
"The Supreme Court decision did

not relate to the tax credit,"
Young said.
The high court, meanwhile,
agreed to review later this term
a Mississippi law which provid-
ed state-owned textbooks at pri-
vate, segregated schools.
In other actions, the court
set the stage for rulings on the
apportionment of the Connecti-
cut and Texas legislatures, on
claims of sex discrimination in
the military and on municipal
bans on jet aircraft takeoffs and
landings at night.
Also, the Democrats were turn-
ed down in a plea for free air
time to match three television
appearances by President Nixon.
Justice William Rehnquist, in
a probably unprecedented action,
explained why he did not dis-
qualify himself from a case in-
volving military surveillance of
civilians.
In a 16-page memorandum
Rehnquist said there was no rea-
son for him to step out of the
case that led to as tot4 ruling
7- 0 - 0

I

last June cutting off a test of the
Army's surveillance of civilians.
He said that while he testified
before a Senate subcommittee as
an assistant attorney general he
never participated, directly or as
an adviser, in the Justice De-
partment's defense of the case.
Rehnquist said it would be unus-
ual if justices did not have at
least "tentative notions" about
constitutional issues before com-
ing to the court. "Proof that a
Justice's mind was a domplete
tabula rasa in the area of con-
stitutional adjudication would be
evidence of lack of qualification,
not lack of bias," he said.
The equal-time case involved
an appeal brought by the Demo-
crat National Committee arguing
that the refusal of the networks
thwarted "the First Amendment
goal of producing an informed
public." The court was silent in
its rejection of the appeal.

DETROIT (MP) - The United Auto
Workers (UAW) said yesterday it
has filed seprate charges against.
the auto inddtry's Big Three -
General Motors, Ford and Chrysler
accusing -them of sex discrim-
ination. -
the UAW said the charges were
filed with the Equal Employment
Opportunities Commission under
provisions of the Civil Rights Act
of 1964.
The union accused each of the
automakers of discriminating
against female employes by pro-
viding.sickness and accident bene-
fits for disabilities, related to preg-
nanicy_ which are "not comparable
to benefits available for other non-
occupational disabilities."
UAW contracts with the a u t o
compallgiS now provide for up to
52 weeks of sick and accident bene-
fits for :disabilities other t h a n
those caused by pregnancy.
UYAW President 'Leonard Wood-
cock said the commission' issued
regulations effective last March 31
nicking it clear that contracts
which fail to treat disabilities
caused by pregnancy the same as
other disabilities are discrimina-
tory and illegal._
Woodcock .said efforts to rene-
gotiate the contract provisions have
been rebuffed by the companies.
A Ford spokesperson said t h e

READ AND USE THE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

company believes the commission's,
guidelines "are neither inding]
upon us nor in accord with the
law. ,' f
"The courts have not yet passed
upon the questions raised by the
commission and involved in the
UAW charge," said Malcolm Den-
ise, Ford's' labor 'relations v i c e-
president. "In the event it were]
to be finally determined that a pro-
vision of our agreement became
legally invalid or unenforceable,
we would fully comply with the
law."

A GM spokesperson said the cor-
poration had not received a copy,
of the UAW charges, "however, we
informed the UAW in July of this
year that under the GM-UAW
agreement, benefits are provided
on an equal basis to both men and
women for disabilities not related
to pregnancy and we do not be-
lieve that the benefit treatment,
provided females for pregnancy ort
complications resulting from preg-I
nancy, which are conditions uni-
que to women, constitute a viola-
tion of Title Seven of the Civill
Rights Act."

14icking,
Quaalude
According to Drug Help of-
ficials Quaaludes - a common
street drug in the city -are
highly addictive and with-
drawal is a dangerous process.
Withdrawal, they say, is safe
only under medical supervi-
sion, and "cold turkey" with-
drawals can be fatal in some
cases.
Both Drug Help (761-HELP)
and the Free People's Clinic
(761-8952) can arrange free
medically supervised w i t h-
drawal. These agencies urge
anyone who suspects he or she
may be addicted to call or visit.

I
if
!
i
I
r
r

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan.tNews phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer. Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
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area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).
Program Information 434 1782
-r

A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
IBUTERFIaJES-
ARE FFEE
GOLDIE 4hWN ::
ELEan ECRR ..::7x)
I a n nroduc ng
E 0 C i1LEI ICOLUMBIA PICTURESPG
Now At The MICHIGAN THEATRE
I Oening Tonilght 8 p.m.
The Dept. of Speech, Communication and Theatre
"PLAYBIL L '72-'73"
PROUDLY PRESENTS
STRATAGEM
by GEORGE FARQUA HR
LYTAHENDESH THETR
Indviua tckets on s$l no :0-8pm
LYDIA MENDELSSOH N BOX OFFICE
BOX OFFICE PHONE: 668-6300
Good seats still available for all performances,
a Individual tickets $2, $3

ON WASHTENAW AVENUE
1 12 miles E. of US 23-Arborland
UNANIMOUSLY ACCLAIMED AT
CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
"A Brilliantly Acted Piece
of Americana"
STARTS FRIDAY!
JOHN
HUSTON IS
IF- COLUMBIAPRCTUPES-; AASTARODUCTIONS G

'I

NIXON U RG ES CLOT U RE
Sena d -ste deal low to antibusing
legislation fails to cut debate
WASHINGTON W) Chances Four hours after the cloture senators absent for yesterday's
,?IhCnt ne ofi ha tnxsxmxntreh fsdn " C27-f rf xnn~~ l xi~

f

for : bete passage o 4 atough
antibusing bill were dealt a se-
vere blow yesterday when the
first move to cut off debate fell
10 votes short of the ;equired
two-thirds majority. But' Presi-
dent Nixon promptly joined in an
effort to force, cloture later this
week.:

Nixonimpl icated in
pespionage

WASHINGTON. () - In response
to reports that the Committee for
the -R-election of the :Presidentj
was involved in political spying andl
espionage, the chairperson of the
House -Banking Committee yester-
day blamed President Nixon for
what he called "the- most sordid
political tactics ever employed by
a major party."
Rep. Wright Patman, (D-Texas),
after hearing of the report in yes-
terday's .Washington Post, -said he
would try again to get his com-
mittee to hold an investigation. But
a GOP member, Ben Blackburn
.f Georgia, said Republicans would
be "crazy" to testify.
The newspaper report said the
FBI has determined that the re-
election committee used a secret
espionage fund in efforts to sabo-
tage the campaigns of every ma-
jor candidate for the Democratic
presidential nomintion and zeroed
in on McGovern after he won it.
"President Nixon is in charge of
his own campaign. He is respon-
sible," Patman said.
The Post said it has learned that
the FBI has- concluded the break-in
and alleged bugging of Democratic
National Committee 'headquarters
in Washington's Watergate office
complex were part of a massive
political-espionage and. sabotage
campaign-that had been under way
since,1971
Calling the campaign "unprece-
delted in scope and intention," the
Post-said the campaign's objectives
included;- "Folldvx ing members of

Democratic candidates families and
assembling dossiers on their per-
sonal lives, forging letters and
distributing them under candidates'
letterheads, leaking false and man-
ufactured items to the press,
throwing campaign schedules into
disarray, seizing confidential cam-
paign files and investigating t h e
lives of dozens of Democratic cam-
paign workers."
White House spokespersons de-
clined further comment, saying of-
ficials of the re-election commit-
tee had already responded a d e-
quately. DeVan Shumway, spokes-
person for the committee called the
article "a piece of fiction."
Patman's committee voted 20 to
15 last week not to investigate the
Watergate incident. But the Texas
Democrat said he will summon all
members to a special session to-
morrow an'd 'ask 'four key Nixon
aides, to appear.
He called on 'the President to
open all records of his campaign
organization and to direct his aides
"to reveal publicly what has gone
on behind the backs of the Amer-
ican people."

move was beaten on a45-37 vote,
the President summoned five
antibusing senators to his Oval
Office and told them he wants a
yes-or-no vote on the disputed
bill.
Sen. Robert Griffin (R-Mich.)
told reporters after this meeting
that Nixon called the House-pass-
ed bill an appropriate vehicle for
reaching his own antibusing
goals.
Griffin added that the Presi-
dent told the senators the White
House is in the process of con-
tacting senators to make certain
they know his position on the
bill.
-Sen. Hubert Humphrey, (D-
Minn.), one of the those opposed
to the House-passed bill, declared
it now has no chance.
"I'll give you an early obit-
uary," he told a reporter. "The
bill has had an early 'and ig-
nominous death but one it real-
ly deserved."
A vote is to be taken again
today and, if necessary, tomor-
row also on invoking cloture, but
the key point in yesterday's vote
was that 37 senators voted
against the motion.
Griffin said he sees a chance
for, cuting off debate on a third
-vote, adding it is "not a good
chance but within the realm of
possibility."
Griffin said he figured one or
two of these 37 might shift on
later votes, but he said also some

vote are against cloture.
As long as 34 senators, o n e
more than a third of the total
membership, stand firm against
shutting off debate, cloture can-
not be obtained.
However, Sen. James Allen,
D-Ala.), who played a key role in
getting the bill before the Sen-
ate, said he was "well pleased."
with the vote and expects a
slightly better showing Wednes-
day.
He told' a reporter that even
if a two-thirds majority cannot
be mustered for cloture, the bill's
supporters can launch a fight
against a motion to put it aside.
If this happens, the situation
will be reversed and backers of
the bill instead of opponents
could wind up conducting a fili-
buster as Congress drives for ad-
journment by the end of the
week.
The roll call showed 20 Demo-
crats and 25 Republicans voting
to cut off debate. Against were
25 Democrats and 12 Republicans.
The bill passed by the House
on Aug. 18 by a 282-102 vote,
would make busing for school de-
segregation a last resort and
even then ban busing a child
farther than to the school next-
nearest to his home.
It would permit also the re-
opening of court orders intschool
desegregation cases to bring
them in line with the bill's re-
strictions on busing.

tool

$2.00

411

I

11

FRI. & SAT.

Evelyne
Beers

ALAN BATES & GENEVIEVE BUJOLD IN PHILIPPE DE-BROCA'S
*THE KING OF HAT
(IN ENGLISH)
WILD AND WACKY FARCE! A Scottish private, scouting behind enemy lines during World War I,
comes upon a town, deserted except for the inmates of the local asylum, who have escaped, and
whom he takes for the usual citizenry. The Germans have left a time-bomb planted somewhere in
the town before it was evacuated. That's the set-up; then the fun begins!
TONIGHT!-oct.11 th-ONLY!-35mm Color & Cinemascoce-7 & 9:30 p.m.
TOMORROW EVENING-Max von Sydow in Bergman's THE HOUR OF THE WOLF
COMING TUESDAY-Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight in MIDNIGHT COWBOY
NEXT WEDNESDAY-Michelangelo Antonioni's RED DESERT
ALL SHOWINGS IN AUDITORIUM "A," ANGEL L HALL-$1
Tickets for all of each evening's shows on sale outside the auditorium at 6 p.m.

4

&Her
Family,
(Eric & Martha
Nagler)
fiddle, bluegrass,
& oldtime
banjo, guitar,
and psaltery

L

0

UAC-DAYSTAR PRESENTS

SUN. $2.00

Stefan

Iowa

MMWA|

DIAL 668-6416
"For this trip, one must fasten
his seat belt and: hold on tight!"
4.. --Saturday Review
WINNER 1972 CANNES
FILM FESTIVAL
JURY PRIZE AWARD

I*

Grossman
(formerly of the
Even Dozen Jug
Band & author of
nine different
instruction books
of various guitar
styles)

I

WED.

Hoot 50c

m ,

::
:, f ;: ,
":
{r ;?li:ji$' ; : ; is

I., i

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