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October 10, 1972 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-10-10

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 10, 1972

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

POOR HARVEST:
USSR faces potato,
Ivegetable shortages

Gandhi refuses CIA proof
NEW DELHI (P)-Prime Minis- Rogers was understood to have
ter Indira Gandhi refused yester- asked Indian Foreign Minister
day to give Secretary of State Swaran Singh last Thursday for
William Rogers the proof he is proof of allegations that the CIA
reported to have requested to sub- was interferring in India's internal
stantiate her charges that the U.S. affairs-a charge denied by the
Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) State Department.
has interfered with Indian affairs. The charges of CIA infiltration
"Everyone knows that CIA has were first made three weeks ago
been active in India and there is by Congress party President Shan-
no question of proving it," the kar Dayal Shama. Gandhi person-
prime minister told a national ally entered the controversy last
Tuesday, warning party members
convention of her Congress Party in eastern Bhar State to be vigilant
in Central Ahmdabad city. against the spy agency.

MOSCOW (A') - Already strug-C
gling to cope with a bad grain har-
vest, Soviet authorities have re-
vealed potato and vegetable crop
failures caused by drought con-
ditions.
The lead editorial in Pravda, the
voice of the Communist party, urg-
ed farmers on Monday to prepare
now for a maximum effort next
year to "compensate for losses of
production in the current year."

major index of agricultural suc-
cess, but also a need to increase
potato and vegetable production.
It had been reported earlier that
searing heat in the Moscow re-
gion had nearly wrecked the crop
Iof potatoes-a staple of the Rus-

It mentioned not only grain,
Busing ban

a

* f tlS4 UIUL* M allf W1 V 11*.* 7 I .
But Pravda's reference to the ; "" ""
potato and vegetable problem in DAY FF IC
dicated crop failures went beyond DAI Y VI I
the Moscow area. Even in the best
of years there are not enough I ..............:':" " s"-" "
vegetables for the Russian table TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10
although potatoes have been in DAY CALENDAR
adequate supply the last few Music School: Wind Instrument Stu-

IAL BULLETIN
definitely interested in Michigan stu-
dents!!
Students interested in Grad & Pro-
fessional Schoolst: A rep. vill be in the

UAC presents
ADE L L E DAVIS
leading nutrionist and author of best-selling LET'S EAT RIGHT
TO KEEP FIT, LET'S COOK IT RIGHT
Speaking on
"THE NUTRITION AWAKENING"
POWER CENTER
TUES., OCT. 17-8 P.M.
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:
Power Center Box Office Eden Foods
Michigan Union Soybean Cellar
The Fishbowl Your Health & Nutrition
Applerose Natural Foods 152312 N. Main)
(404 W. Liberty) Salvation Records
A BENEFIT FOR THE MICH. FEDERATION OF FOOD CO-OPS
DONATION $1.75
SPECIAL EVENINGS- SHE
Sunday and.Monday: Qvarlcr Nights
(BEER AND WINE)
Tuesday: All drinks 2 Price
Wednesday: Singles Night
free admission and all drinks
2 price for women
341 So. Main, Ann Arbor 769-5960

The perfect gift for
At Dallas' Neiman-Marcus department st
size robots of yourself and your spouse t
laugh at jokes and say yes in any lang
button. Edward Marcus, who heads the sti
remote controls of two dummies.
CHOU COMMENTS:.
on heir ti
SHANGHAI (A') - A spate of re- presents
ports on who may succeed Mao of succe
Tse-tung as China's leader leaves by a cor
waters muddied and raises the the topl
possibility that the Peking leader- lead to
ship wants it that way. Mao. Th

years. dent Recital, Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall,
Yesterday, the U. S. Depart- 1230 pm.
votlotuesterday, LSA Coffee Hour: Psychology Dept.,
cioture ment of Agriculture in Washing- 2549 LSA Bldg., 3 pm.
ton reported a serious food sit- E Extension Service. & EnglishLang.j
uatin inthe ovie Unin, ctin Lit.: Walter Clark, poetry reading.
sv, UGLI Multipurpose Rm., 4:10 pm.
set in Senate "various sources." It said Mos- Music School: Flue Student Recital,f
cow may be planning to import Sch. of Mus. Recital Hall, 4:30 pm.
more food from satellite countries Women's Studies film Series: "Re-
WASHINGTON () - A Sen- in addition to the massive ur- member Me When This You See" (On
ate vote will be taken today on chase of 20 million tans of wheat Gertrude Stein), UGLI Multipurpose
cuttng of th fiibuser o anRm., 7 pm.
cutting-businthe ilibuster on a from the United States. Residential College Renaissance Dra-
at-buig bl passed by th The ma Film: "Anthony & Cleopatra,"!
House. e grain harvest, planned for Italy, silent, and "Macbeth," Britain,
The legislation would make bus- an average of 195 million tons a Residential Col. Aud., 7 pm.
ing for school desegregation a last year during the current five-year Musical Society:, Beryoska Dance Co.,
resort and prohibit it altogether period, may fall well below the Power Center, 8 pm.
resot ad pohiit t atogthe 170miliontonmar ths yar. Rive Gauche: Italian Language Night
to a school other than the one 70-million ton mark this year. 1024 Hill St., 9 pm.
next nearest to a student's home. Harvesters in Siberia and north- ORGANIZATION NOTICES
The bill also would permit the ern Kazakhstan are trying to CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
reopening of court orders in school bring in crops damaged by rain Ac0tion / Peace Corps / Vista wili be
desegregation cases to bring them and snow with time running out. on Campus Oct. 17. 18, 19, in 3529 SAB
in line with the bill's, restrictions. to talk with interested students. Since
AP Photo A two-thirds majority of sena- The Michigan Daily, edited and man- 1961, The U of M has supplied fourth
Cstors voting is required to put the ged by students at the University of largest number of volunteers. They are
ZllS t~xStos vtig s eqire t pt heMichigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second -
Senate's anti-filibuster rule into Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
ore you can order life- effect. igan 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
hat, when programmed, The. first attempt to cut off de- Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues- YOUR LAST DATE
urge at the touch of a bate is expected to fail but, in case day through Sunday morning Univer-
ore, center, operates the it does, more tries will be made carrier (campus area); $1 local mail
later this week. sin Mich. or Ohio): $13 non-local mail (I twas for a lot of others, too!)
- If a two-thirds majority cannot (other states and foreign).
be obtained in three attempts the Summer Session published Tuesday MASTER-DATE matches you in
be heled or histhrough Saturday morning. Subscrip- i ,proaltitrss
bill is likely to be shelved for this tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus I o o k s, personality, interests.
year. area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or Free questionnaire.
In advance of this initial test tatesand; $ reig .-local mal (other P.O. Box 1912, Ann Arbor 48106
d vote, senators argued yesterday
M ix Iover the use of busing as a way - -
to achieve school desegregation.
Forced busing was denounced as
disruptive and contrary to the
aO popular will and defended as an THE TELEPHONE
essential tool, in some cases, toTHTE EO N
wipeoutracial segregation.
Lb ~~~Leaders of opposing sides in theIS R NN G.
the idea that the question battle over the bill expect to ii- " "
ssion in Peking is clouded tial attempt to invoke the Sen-
ntinuing and deep split in ate's antifilibuster rule to fall And that's the way we like it. But some of you have been calling
leadership that likely will short. us in the morning when we're not at the Health Service Input
a power struggle after - phone to help answer your questions, cut red tape, and stand up
is view is held by a num- for your rights. Our hours are from noon-three, weekdays. Please

uil.U mr om.way ne4 a teu niv. aw
School on Oct. 10, The University of
Toledo-College of Bus. Ad., Oct. 11,
and Duke Univ. Law School, Oct. 12.
Career Minded Students: A rep will
be at the Office from American Mo-
tors, Oct. 13, seeking Journalism Ma-
jors.
Visits Postponed: C. R. Bard, Inc.
scheduled to be on Campus on Oct. 10,
has postponed visit until Nov. 30. Yale
Law School scheduled to be on cam-
epus Oct. 11, has postponed visit, will
reschedule at laterdate.

The Best of
the First
Annual
N.Y. Erotic
Film Festival

.E

Did OUI sell out
to the
Establishmtent'?,
Frankly, we don't know. All we know is 800,000
copies of the premiere issue disappeared from
the newsstands within 36 hours after publication.
So either OUI is a very heavy magazine, or
we've got a very heavy Establishment. Find out
for yourself in the November issue, oh sale now.

+I

,i

Oddly, all the reports could be ber of Western China watchers as
correct to some extent. Two of well.
them are in fact, differing ver- If a collective emerged there is
sions of what Premier Chou En- a good chance that eventually itj
lai said to a group of visiting would go the way of "collectives""
American editors. in other Communist-ruled nations.
One has Chou predicting a col- After Joseph Stalin died the So-
lective leadership after Mao, now viet Union - with European
nearing 79, passes from the scene. Communists obediently following
The other, referring to the same suit - proclaimed a collective
interview, has Chou indicating the leadership. It seemed a clumsy
likely successor to be Yao Wen- arrangement for a dictatorship,
yuan, a youngish Politboro mem- and before, long Nikita Krushchev
ber and author, who is a protege decollectivized it.
of Mao's wife, Chiang Ching. The way matters look from a
Yao is in his fifties, and a lit- distance, Chou is at present the1
erary firebrand of the revolution. single most powerful man in China
He writes skillfully in a polemic after Mao. In all probability he
manner which appeals to Mao, will wield power after Mao, but it
himself a poet and essayist. could be that Chou, the diplomat
Yao in November 1965 wrote a and fence-mender, -would arrange
slashing criticism of a play by the to have the succeeding regime
deputy mayor of Peking, Wu Han, take on the look of a collective.
called "Hai Jui's Dismissal from Still, Chou may be intentionally
Office." Mao saw the play as an throwing sand in the world's eyes.
attack on his 1959 dismissal of De- The fact of the matter may be!
fense Minister Peng Teh-huai. that the Russians are close to the
Yao's criticism touched off the answer: that there remain deep
Cultural Revolution. divisions brought about by the
Yet another report, this from political upheavals of the cultural'
Shanghai, says speculation there revolution and these make risky,
is that surely Chou himself will any speculation about the future
succeed to Mao's power. But since top leadership.
Chou is 74, this speculation is
projected beyond him. It names
Yao and another Politburo mem-
ber from Shanghai, Chang Chun-
chiao, as probable successors not
to Mao but to Chou.
Chang was a deputy chief of the
Cultural Revolution Committee
and, like Yao, closely associated
with Ms. Mao in the turbulent days
of the nationwide purge.
The Soviet Union repeatedly
TUES./WED.

NOTICE
Jobs are available . .!
For FREE information on
student assistance. a n d
placement program send'
self-addressed STAMPED
envelope to the National
Placement Registry, 1001
East Idaho St., Kalispelle,
Mt. 59901.
-NO GIMMICKS-

call us then at..--
763-4384 -

FRI.-SAT.
Oct. 13-14

I

I

"I

Health
Service
Weekdays
Noon to Three

763-4384
7 ari
ahd

7:30-9-10:30 p.m.
i*
Not. Sci. Aud.
$1 25 cont.
FRIENDS OF NEWSREEL

oui

for the man of the world

11

I

Z4 T

U U

. .r.

I1

ENDS WEDNESDAY!

,UIIi

BEST-SELLER BECOMES
MOVIE SPY-THRILLER!
THE SALZBURG
ialmuaWrmiArU

I

g a l

ur -.--

Single Tickets OnSale Now

I

COLORBY ELUEt
OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT 1:15,
3:10-5 p.m.-7 p.m.-9 p.m.

STUDENTS-Help organize
the SOC Grocery Co-op
You voted for it, now work

STARTS THURSDAY

for it. All

positions open,

I

__u
ORCHID WALLY '
217'ASH 2PM-2AM

Two Short Features:
Immortal Story

from Board of Directors
down. Assume power.
All interested call SOC,
763-3241

on

I

I

Dir. ORSON WELLES, 1968
Welles acts out a story of an
old man who pays a sailor to
sleep with his wife so he can
have a son before he dies.
With JEANNE MOREAU
-AND-
Simon of the Desert
Dir. LUIS BUNUEL, 1966
A saintly man, living on a pillar
in the desert, is tempted by the
devil in the form of a woman
(Silvia Pinal).
ARCHITECTURE
AUDITORIUM
7 & 9 p.m.--75c

3 SHOWS DAILY
1 p.m.-4:30-8 p.m.
PRICE POLICY
ADULTS MAT. $2.00
EVE. $2.50
CHILDREN $1.00

' ' I

____ _ i,

M-21

-T

DOUBLE-FEATURE HORROR SHOW! Two by ROGER CORMAN

LITTLE SHOP
- OF HORRORS
A new member of the vegetable kindom says,
"Give, me to eat!"-A florist's helper de-
velops a hybrid plant which demands BLOOD.
SHOWN AT 7 & 9:30 P.M.

CREATURE FROM
THE} HAUNTED SEA
Underseas monsters are jealous creatures. They
don't relish having their domain invaded by
"phony" monsters.
SHOWN AT 8:15 & 10:45 P.M.

A FRANKOVICH PRODUCTION
R IC RITAI.J

_ I

aw
..
ku..r a :r#.., v ..., .. Js.. .r u~_ .,,... .. .. ==ot~ t*;. , k ~ '- .a; *' ... ,.1 , ,-. - u. '^r- .:r

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