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September 27, 1972 - Image 7

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-27

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Wednesday,. September 27, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Wednesday, September 27, 1 9 7 2 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Sorority Rush

It's already started

But you can still register
Call 769-6367, Monday-Friday 1-5
Or Register at any house
during rush itself

History
Undergraduate Association
MASS MEETING
1:30 p.m.-Septemiber 28
Ugh Multipurpose Room
To elect ofilcersI
-To decide what is to be done

By WILLIAM MANN
Associated Press Writer
DACCA, Bangladesh - Nine
months after East Pakistan be-
came Bangladesh, Sheik Mujibur
Rahman's ruling Awami League
is still promising solutions to the
country's basic crises. But most
problems are worse than ever, and
the promises apparently are wear-
ing thin.
Workers and students, many of
them former supporters of the
sheik, parade through the streets
of the capital carrying signs andI
chanting slogans or congregate to
air their grievances.
"Burn the throne we gave Mu-
jib," shouted leaders of a student
march that wound through Dacca's
main streets to the Secretariat,'
where several hundred partici-
pants stormed inside and ransack-
ed the office of the education min-
ister.
On the same day, red-capped la-
borers demonstrated at the prime
minister's official residence as the
sheik met with lower-ranking ad-

I.~~ ~ ______________________________

HIGH PRICES:
Bangladesh crisis unsolved;
demonstrations rock Dacca

PRICES GOOD THRU SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1972
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT QUANTITIES. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS

e72

ministrators on the country's con-
tinuing problems.
Abdur Rab, leader of a student
group that broke away from the
Awami League student wing, ha-
rangued a crowd estimated as
high as 100,000 with veiled threats
of violence unless the situation
changes. ,
The complaints generally are the
same.
Prices are high - in many cases
higher than ever before, even when
Bangladesh was East Pakistan un-
der what Bengalis called colonial
rule by West Pakistan.
Sheik Mujib acknowledges that
corruption is rampant among
Awami Leaguers, and he is report-
ed to have told the officials meet-
ing in Dacca that they will be lia-
ble for antigraft prosecution un-
less corruption is reduced.
Students want educational bene-
fits, workers pay raises. Unions
are at odds with each other be-
cause several claim representa-
tion in each industry, making all
ineffective. Workers are restive be-
cause they believe earlier govern-
ment statements that labor rules
a Socialist system toward which
Bangladesh claims to be heading,
but in Bangladesh their lives still
remain extremely hard.
"People are talking against the
government, openly, more now
than ever before," said an Amer-
ican businessman working in Dac-
ca.
jInflation has cut the value of
the taka, Bangladesh's currency,
by more than half in border areas
and by at least 30 per cent every-
where. Many of the promises are
aimed at that problem.
Mujib has pledged stern govern-
ment moves against corrupt of-
ficials, smugglers and hoarders,
generally blamed for the infla-
tion. Their illicit dealings continue.
M. R. Siddiqi, commerce minis-
ter, promised at a rally that
prices would plummet in October,
"when the imports start arriving."
The government has been prom-
ising since June that fair-price
shops to dispense cloth, a short
items, would be set up. Few have
been.
Politically, Mujib seems on firm
ground, but not his government.
He has promised elections early in
1973, and the Awami League, the
only party currently represented in
the Constituent Assembly, stands
to lose seats. The best guess is that
it will emerge with a 60 per cent
majority.
But there is talk in Dacca that
the party will split before the elec-
tions, with Mujib heading a coa-
lition encompassing all opposition
TONIGHT=-SEPT. 27
7 & :30
AUD. "A," ANGELL HALL
the ann arbor film cooperative
ANN ARBOR PREMIERE!
some of
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see advertisement, page 2

parties to quiet opposition rhet-
oric.
"The Bangabandhu Mujib and
Bangladesh are one and the same,"
said a Western relief official. "But
the Awami League is in trouble.
One reason for the League's di-
lemma, the official said, can be
traced to corruption that diverted
possibly 70 per cent of the hun-
dreds of thousands of tons of food
grains sent to Bangladesh as food
relief. Much of it was smuggled
into India or sold in Bangladesh, he
said.
Another reason for lack of ad-
ministrative management seems to
be the Awami League govern-
ment's inability to eliminate a sort
of colonial mentality.
"The government has had a hard
time converting from a provincial
administration to a central unit,"
said a Bengali civil servant who re-
cently returned from West Paki-
stan to a government job. "Nobody
will take decisions."
The only publicized decision
made during Mujib's absence
served only to tighten the admin-
istrative bottleneck in the capital.
Faced with street demonstra-
tions by workers claiming to be
civil servants, Islam sliced the 9-
5 work day to 6 hours, 7:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m., the working hours dur-
ing the Pakistani administrations.
City Council
OKs ban. on
airplane ads
City Council Monday night un-
animously passed on first read-
ing an ordinance that w o u 1 d
ban air advertisements.
The measure, which'must be
passed on second reading to
become law, says, "No person
shall operate, or cause to be
operated, any type of motor-
ized aircraft over the city while
said aircraft tows any adver-
tising display."
Commenting on the ordinance,
Mayor Robert Harris said,-"The
essence of the problem is noise
and not advertising."
The measure would ban planes
with advertising streamers fly-
ing over the football field dur-
ing games.
Complaints were received
about the noise from low flying
towing planes, which are n o t
supposed to go below 500 feet.
Register now
The sands of time are running
low if you want to vote in No-
vember's general election. Only
10 days remain before you dis-
enfrancise yourself. A list of
registration sites can be obtain-
ed from the city clerk.Call 761-
2400, extension 222.

I

AS

YELL W
PENCILS
10 count package equipped
with erasers tips.
9c pkg.
Our Reg. 28c
SCHOOL SUPPLIES DEPT.

ITS!*

Look and feel your best in these hand-
some knit slacks of 100% polyester
knit bonded to nylon tricot. They are
machine washable permanent press
and are available in assorted colors of
solids and fancies. Waist sizes 32
to 42.

BOYS'
SPICE TAN SHOES
__ , GREAT FOR GIRLS TOO!

Our Reg. $9.96

96

Leather uppers in
sizes 32 to 6.

RHODES
FROZEN

ONLY
16 oz. wt c
pkg.
59 lb.
79 clb.

MEIJER U.S.D.A. GRADE A

0

0

0

0

ENDS & PIECES MIXED

CUT FROM QUARTER LOIN

9-11
PIECES

SAVEI12c c
with this coupou /
toward the purchase pa
ICuv DEL MONTE
17 oz. wt. can S
* FRUIT COCKTAIL 15c ;
I WITH COUPON
Good Tues., Sept. 26 thru Sat., Sept. 30, 1972
P..E....m.ff".r...mt........ ....... ... .... DT.h

U ~ Ammmmmimmmmm
I 2 SAVE 10c
~with this 'Coupon '
toward th purchase oft
48 fl. oz. bottle
IVORY LIQUID 89c
WITH COUPON3
Good Tues., Sept. 26 thru Sat., Sept. 30, 1972
. ri Coupon "M F firniTed n per " DEPYv

inAmmmm="m mn.i,
S SAVE 38C2
61 C* qq with this toupont0
toward the purchase oft I
C Q ~ REGULAR OR SUPER "0 N
40 ct. box
® KOTEX TAMPONS 99c U
WITH COUPON
Good Tues., Sept. 26 thru Sat., Sept. 30, 1972
-- * .., ,. . . . . . ... . . ....? DEPT.

i

an

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