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September 27, 1972 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-27

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 27, 1972

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, September 27, 1972

r

N.

Viets claim

U.S.

spy attempt

(Continued from Page 1)
seven other POWs who were
brought forward for interviews
Monday, but I was not advised
that the alleged materials for es-
pionage were to be shown.
I was elsewhere in Hanoi when
the display took place at the Hoa
Binh Hotel.
Later Weiss told of the display
and I received photographs which
she said the North Vietnamese had
described as showing packages
andcontents sent to American
prisoners.
A Pentagon spokesperson, Maj.
Gen. Daniel James, said when
asked for comment in Washington,
"The charges are too ridiculous

to dignify by trying to address squeezed out revealed what HanoiI
them in detail. I know of no in- said was a receiving apparatus
stance of such actions taking place with a battery compartment and
and I think it is just another of an earpiece,
the propaganda web that Hanoi is A
spinning to obscure the real factsi of cellulose paper inside, 2 by 3
concerning her intransigient posi- inches, with instructions for writ-
tion in refusing to negotiate mean- ing messages that would not be
ingfully for our prisoners of war. detectable. The special paper was
On the pictures three names of to be folded so that it made a
alleged recipients could be seen- sharp edge and the secret message
Charles Robert Tyler of Mesa, was to be written with this edge,
Ariz.; Edward Alan Brudno of IteNrhVenms ad hn
H arrisondN.Y, and William Rob the North Vietnamese said. Then,
by using a code word in a normal
inson of Robersonville, N.C. letter, the prisoner would tell the
Weiss' group described the pack- ter e iving ileethab
i ags an incoseddevies:there was a special message to be
-An extra-large tube of Col- found by special processing of the
,gate toothpaste which when paper.
-A peanut shell that had been

One small cellulose sheet was
said to have asked for verification
of the deaths of five American
fliers, as announced by the North
Vietnamese, and information about
any others known to be dead.
The same sheet asked recipients
to provide any information about
prisoners captured anywhere in
Indochina. The instructions with
this were said to read, "Identify
X reference word X provide de-
tails on letter writing procedure X.I
Are you under constant observa-
tion by guards or interrogators
while writing home queries? Are
some POW's not allowed to write?
Do you get to keep your letters
from home? Do POWs have access
to or control of communications
receivers? What frequencies and
times can you receive queries? If
not available, what critical parts
are needed to build a receiver?
How effective are covert POW
communications?"

Z'1 4'1 wwr -T 70

POW release stirs
partisan responses

AP Photo
Four more years?
While anti-war demonstrators yesterday chant, "Stop the bomb-
ing," President Nixon pays tribute to the immigrants who came
to, America. Nixon, standing beneath the Statue of Liberty in
New York Harbor, was forced to pause several times during his
speech as his supporters shouted "Four more years, four more
years." Nixon attended the dedication of the American Museum of
Immigration.
CITY GAINS:
Model Cities board
loses power suit

By The Associated Press {
The release of three American
prisoners of war by North Vietnam
has become a hot new issue in the
presidential campaign.
Hanoi is "just exploiting these
people for their own propaganda
aims," Vice President Spiro Ag-
new charged yesterday.
He said if North Vietnam wasl
really sincere it would "deal with
the duly elected government of the
United States instead of every dis-
sident antiwar group who is at-
tempting to make a contact in be-
half of mainly themselves rather
than of the prisoners, in my judg-
ment."}
In San Francisco, Democratic1
presidential candidate George Mc-
Govern blamed what he described
as interference by the Nixon ad-
ministration for the delay of a
week in the departure of the pri-
soners from Hanoi. ,
"In the last several days," Mc-
Governdeclared, "we have seen
that the Nixon administration is
. . more concerned about the
opinions these men might express
than it is about speeding their re-
lease.
"I believe the President is
afraid these prisoners will tell the
awful truth about the war - that
it is the bombing that keeps them
in prison."
McGovern also said he believes
his "nudging" of the administra-
tion is partly responsible for Ha-
noi's decision to allow three freed
American prisoners to return
home. He had said Sunday the ad-
ministration was "playing politics"
with the men by insisting that they
undergo military briefings on their,
return.{
Defense Secretary Melvin Laird
said McGovern was making him-
self "a spokesman for the enemy."
McGovern appeared briefly with
Barbara Mullen, wife of a Marine
Corps major shot down over Laos

in 1966 and listed as missing. Mul-
len, coordinator of an organization
of POW families, said the latest
three returning airmen have earn-
ed the right to go home to their
families without interference from
the military and to tell their stor-
ies freely.,
"I want to hear what these men
have to say," Mullen said.

hollowed out and contained a mes-
sage, and also cans of Carnation
milk and Maxwell House instant
coffee which Hanoi said also had
contained messages.
-A toy hippopotamus about 1%
inches long, sealed, which when
opened showed an enclosure with
raised writing on one side reading
"use secret hiding place" and on
the other, "hold together, stand
up."
-A bar of Ivory soap, with a
wrapper, but cut in half, each
half gouged out and containing
plastic bags full of capsules said
by the North Vietnamese to be
used for secret writing.

MASS MEETING
'UM Ski Team
S Wed., 1:30 p.m.
Faculty Club Lounge
Michigan Union
665-0938

9

1

THE HUMAN RIGHTS PARTY
invites al women of
Washtenaw County to
MEET OUR WOMEN CANDIDATES
SUSAN WINNING-County Comm. 15th district
SUSAN NEWELL--County Comm. 14th district
1:30 p.m. Thursday, September 28
304 S. Thayer, Ann Arbor
761-6650
coffee and dessert
IMAGINE TIS:
A mountain of steamed
'. corned beef piled high on
a New York Onion Roll,'
Garnished with a slice of
A
dill pickle.
4
Stop Dreaming
Start Eating
In the MICHIGAN UNION 4
lower level

U. S. District Judge Charles
Joiner ruled in favor of Ann Ar-
bor Monday in a suit filed against
City Council by the Model Cities
Policy Board, but admonished
both-sides to stop the "bickering
apd back-biting."
The policy board claimed in the
lawsuit that the city and the fed-
eral Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD) were
attempting to take away the
board's authority in running the
$1 million program by relegating
the board to an advisory rather
than decision-making capacity.
The lawsuit asked Joiner to
draw up a new ordinance concur-
ring with the board's views of citi-
zen participation.
The board also asked for injunc-
tions to prevent the city and HUD
from-enforcing the local Model Ci-
ties ordinances, and for the city
and' HUD to redraw a contract
providing for more citizen partici-
pation in the program.
Joiner, in his opinion issued
Convocation
honors 'U'
professors
Awards were given Monday
night to eleven University profes-
sors and -one former faculty mem-
ber for teaching, service and schol-
arship.
A total of $10,500 in awards
was presented at the University's
annual Faculty - Staff Convoca-
tion.
Awards presented at the convo-
cation included five of $1,000 each,
given to senior faculty members
for outstanding teaching and re-
search. Funds were provided by
the Michigan Annual Giving Fund
of the Development Office.
Recipients of the Distinguished
Achievement Awards are: Robert
Bartels, professor of mathematics
and director of the Computing Cen-
ter; Charles Child, III, professor
and chairman of the department of
surgery; Donald Kerr, professor
and chairman of oral pathology in
the School of Dentistry, and pro-
fessor of pathology (for dentistry)
in the School of Medicine; Marilyn
Mason, professor of music and
chairman of the organ department;
Alfred Sussman, professor of bot-
any and associate dean of the
School of Graduate Studies.

Monday, acknowledged that there
had been a breakdown in citizen
participation in the program.
Model Cities program Director
Herbert Wingo, speaking from his
office last night, said, "There's no
jubilation here. I'm pleased with
the results of the court, but there's
no winners in this suit. We've all
got to get together to make the
program work."
The lawsuit stemmed in part
from the council's refusal last Ap-
ril to go along with a policy board
request that Wingo be fired for
alleged inefficiency.

III

Thomas B.

Roth, O.D.

11

ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF HIS NEW OFFICE
FOR THE PRACTICE OF OPTOMETRY
AT

PINE VALLEY OFFICE BLDG.
SUITE 103
2500 Packard Rd.,
Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
OFFICE HOURS
BY APPOINTMENT

11

ATTENTION
ELIGIBLE VOTERS OF ANN ARBOR
Friday, October 6, 1972, at 8:00 p.m. is the
deadline set by law for persons to register to vote in
the November 7, Presidential Election.
IF YOU ARE ALREADY REGISTERED TO VOTE IN
ARBOR, BUT HAVE MOVED WITHIN THE CITY, YOU
SHOULD FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS WITH THE CITY
CLERK'S OFFICE AT CITY HALL. A CONVENIENT WAY
FOR VOTERS TO FILE A CHANGE OF ADDRESS IS TO
MAIL THEIR VOTER I.D. CARD TO THE CITY CLERK'S
OFFICE WITH THE CHANGE OF ADDRESS INFORMA-
TION FILLED OUT IN THE SPACE PROVIDED ON THE
CARD. CHANGES OF ADDRESS MUST BE RECEIVED BY
OCTOBER 6, 1972.
Voter registration or change of address activities may be
accomplished by coming in person to the City Clerk's Office
Monday through Friday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Clerk's
Office will also be open on Saturday, September 30, 8:00 a.m.
to 5:00 p.m. and on Friday, October 6, until 8:00 p.m. The
Clerk's Office is located on the Second Floor of City Hall,
100 N. Fifth Avenue.
In addition to City Hall, deputy voter registrars will be
available to process new voter registrations and changes of
address at the following locations and times:
1. Thurston School, 2300 Prairie Street: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
2. Angel School, 1608 S. University Avenue: October 2-Octo-
ber 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
3. Stone School, 2800 Stone School Road: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
5. Mack School, 920 Miller Ave.: October 2-October 6, from
5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
6. Pittsfield School, 2543 Pittsfield Blvd.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
7. Northside School, 912 Barton Dr.: October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. ,
8. Peace Neighborhood Center, 1121 N. Maple Rd.: October
2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
9. Fire Station No. 3, 2130 Jackson Ave.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
10. West Stadium Shopping Center at Stadium Pharmacy,
1930 W. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
11. Lamp Post Plaza Shopping Center at the Wrigley Store,
2366 E. Stadium Blvd.: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
12. Maple Village Shopping Center at the Mall Area next to
Maple Village Pharmacy: October 2-October 6, from 5:00
p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
13. Forest Hills Community Center, 2351 Shadowood Dr.:
September 25-September 29, and October 2-October 6,
from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
14. Ann Arbor Public Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave.: Monday
through Friday until October 6, from 1:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m. and on Saturday, September 30, from 1:00 p.m. to
6:00 p.m.
15. University of Michigan Campus location at the "Fish-
bowl" (between Angel-Mason Hall) on the Diagonal, de-
pending upon the weather, Monday through Friday until
October 6, from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
16. Summit Medical Center, 704 Spring St.: September 25-
September 28, and October 2-October 5, from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m., 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9:00
p.m. and September 29 and October 6, from 9:00 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
17. Campus Corner Drugstore at the intersection of Packard
and State: September 25-September 30, and October 2-
October 5, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to
9:00 p.m. and October 6, from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
and 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
18. Alice Lloyd Hall, 100 S. Observatory St.: September 27-
September 29, and October 2, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
19. Mosher-Jordan Hall, 200 S. Observatory St.: October 3-
October 6 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
20. Mary Markley Hall, 1425 Washington Heights: September
25-September 29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m.
to 8:00 p.m.
21. Bursley Hall, 1931 Duffield St.: September 25-September
29, and October 2-October 6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
22. West Quadrangle, 541 Thompson St.: September 25-Sep-
tember 29, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
23. South Quadrangle, 600 E. Madison St.: October 2-October
6, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
24. East Quadrangle, 701 E. University Ave.: September 25-
September 29, from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.
9C V ll n -rn . + i.- - - - - - -f QC' aa n A T",

A

TONIGHT!-SEPT. 27
7 & 9:30
AUD. "A," ANGELL HALL
the ann arbor film cooperative
ANN ARBOR PREMIERE!
5onie of
my Sm
frinds ore...
'-aCOLOR 8Y MOVIELAS81a.
AN AMERICAN INC RNATIONAL RELEASE
see advertisement, page 2

11

I

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k1

PHONE
973-1990

i

WED.-SAT AT 9:00
AND WE')
4COUFU OF R~M I
SUN.-TUES. AT 9:00
WOLFGANG
S .-
217S.ASH 2 RM.- 2A M

in the first grade, when you were taught
to read "Run Spot Run," you had to read it
out loud. Word-by-word. Later, in the second
grade, you were asked to read silently. But
you couldn't do it.
You stopped reading out loud, but you
continued to say every word to yourself.
Chances are, you're doing it right now.
This means that you read only as fast
as you talk. About 250 to 300 words per
minute. (Guiness' Book of World Records
lists John F. Kennedy as delivering the fast-
est speech on record: 327 words per
minute.)
The Evelyn Wood Course teaches you
to read without mentally saying each word
to yourself. Instead of reading one word at
a time, you'll learn to read groups of words.
To see how natural this is, look at the
dot over the line in bold type.
grass is green
fou immediately see all three words.
Now look at the dot between the next two
lines of type.
and it grows'9
when it rains
With training, you'll learn to use your
innate ability to see groups of words.
As an Evelyn Wood graduate, you'll be
able to read between 1,000 and 3,000
words per minute . . . depending on the
difficulty of the material.
At 1,000 words per minute, you'll be
able to read a text book like Hofstadtler's
American Political Tradition and finish
each chapter in 11 minutes.
At 2,000 words per minute, you'll be
.able to read a magazine like Time or News-

week and finish each page in '31 seconds.
'At 3,000 words per minute, you'll be
able to read the 447 page novel The God.
father in 1 hour and 4 minutes.
These are documented statistics based
on the results of the 450,000 people who
have enrolled in the Evelyn Wood 'course
since its inception in 1959.
The course isn't complicated. There
are no machines. There are no notes to
take. And you don't have to memorize any-
thing.
95% of our graduates have improved
their .reading ability by an average of 4.7
times. On rare occasions, a graduate's read.
ing ability isn't improved by at least 3 times.
In these instances, the tuition is completely
refunded,
Take a free
Mini-Lesson
on Evelyn Wood.
Do you want to see how the course
works?
Then take a free Mini-Lesson.M The
Mini-Lesson is an hour long peek at what
the Evelyn Wood course offers.
We'll show you how it's possible to
accelerate your speed without skipping a
single word. You'll have a chance to try your
hand at it, and before it's over, you'll actually
increase your reading speed. (You'll only
increase it a little, but it's a start.)
We'll show you how we can extend your
memory. And we'll show you how we make
chapter outlining obsolete.
Take a Mini-Lesson this week. It's a
wild hour. And it's free.

Ui

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NEW HOURS:
12-2 p.m.- p.m.-midnight

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