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September 14, 1972 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1972-09-14

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Thursday, September 14, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three,

Thursday, September 14, 1972 THE MICHiGAN DAILY Page Three

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U.S.-USSR trade pact likely
as result of Kissinger's talks

MOSCOW (A) - A leading Soviet
news correspondent, reporting on
Henry Kissinger's Kremlin talks,
said yesterday the United States
and the Soviet Union are on the
verge of signing a giant new trade
pact. It may include the location
of an American trade center in
Moscow, complete with hotels.
The Kremlin talks have been
held since Monday in secrecy with
officials from neither side disclos-
ing what was going on.
Victor Louis, a Soviet citizen who
writes for the London Evening
Standard from Moscow, said in a
dispatch to the newspaper yester-
day that one of the outcomes of
the talks would be a trade agree-
ment, that would be worth $4.90
billion a year by 1977.
Louis wrote that Kissinger's de-
cision to extend his stay in Mos-
cow by one day "seemed to un-
derline" that the trade negotia-
tions "had gone beyond the stage
of consultation."
"The pact would lead to trade
and Export-Import bank credits on

London he had reached an agree-
ment with the Soviets that would
involve an estimated $5 billion.
* From generally well-informed
Soviet sources came the report
that Kissinger and Kremlin lead-
ers were close to settling Russia's
World War II lend-leage debt, a
major obstacle to expanding Sov-
iet-American trade.
Bilateral trade was believed to
have been on the agenda for Kis-
singer's talks with Communist par-
ty chief Leonid Brezhnev, Premier
Alexei Kosygin and Foreign Min-
ister Andrei Gromyko.
Other topics were said to include
the Vietnam war, European secur-

ity and the limitation of strategic
arms.
West European diplomats said
mutual force reductions in Europe
and the Soviet-promoted European
security conference were two of
the principal subjects on Gromyko's
agenda with Kissinger.
Apparently other subjects such
as U.S.-Soviet trade and Vietnam
were discussed during Kissinger's
talks with Brezhnev and Kosygin.
Kissinger's trip to Paris on Fri-
day has lent support to growing
speculation that he would meet
with Le Duc Tho, North Vienam's
top adviser to the Vietnam peace
talks.

I--------_-I

HELD I # O4
OVER!

Sale of U.S. wheat to.
mainland China reported
WASHINGTON 01) - Govern- trade agreement with China. I don't
ment sources said yesterday t h e know how close it will be. The
United States has sold some wheat President opened the door a little

DIAL
8-6416

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and forwards in space and time with utter abandon . . . from
the grimness of a German P.O.W. camp in winter to the lush-
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2 THIS TRIP, ONE MUST FASTEN
...a SEAT BELT AND HOLD ON TIGHT!"
-Arthur Knight, Saturday Review
WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM
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Only American Film to be so Honored
KURT VONNEGUT JR'S
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accompanying the 1926 Silent Film Classic
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plus SING-ALONG and POP-CONCERT
W EDNESDAY, SEPT. 20
at 8 p.m.
MICHIGAN THEATER
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Advance tickets on sale at the Theater

a scale that only the superpowers to China, the first American grain!
could afford," he added. "T h e sale to the Communist country in'
Americans are already planning a more than 20 years.
trade center in Moscow complete The sources, asking not to be,
with American firms and hotels identified, said at least one U.S.
- and the American way of doing export company is involved. The'
business." Agriculture Department declined'
He added Russia would probably comment.
be granted "most-favored nation According to the sources, how-f
status similar to that already en- ever, the department has received
joyed by Poland and Yugoslavia." applications for export subsidies on{
U.S. officials in Moscow said they wheat to be shipped to China.'
had no information on the report. A spokesman for the Export Mar-
Louis' report coincided with one keting Services in the department
from the news agency Tass that said he could not confirm or deny
the American firm, Occidental Pe- the reports. However, he said
troleum, opened a business office "something" might be announced
in Moscow Wednesday. later today or early tomorrow.
Occidental's president, Armand Secretary of Agriculture E a r 1
Hammer, has been in Moscow con- Butz said if a deal was pending;
ducting his own secret negotiations or already concluded, he was un-
with the Russians for the p a s t aware of it.
week. He said, however, "Down theI
In July, Hammer announced in road sometime is a substantial1
Church fails to appear
at coference on aging
at co

bit with his China trip."
Butz also said a deal conceivably
could have been made by a pri-
vate company and the government
would not necessarily have a n y
knowledge of it.
Rumors have circulated in the
grain trade that China has order-
ed at least 20 million bushels of
U.S. wheat. Nixon administration
officials have been predicting for
some time that China would soon
open up as a new U.S. farm ex-
port market.
The unofficial report of w h e a t
sales to China came on the eve of
a congressional hearing t o d a y
on the question of earlier, much
larger wheat sales to the Soviet
Union.
Those sales, amounting to 400j
million bushels, helped push wheat
prices up sharply this summer.
The Soviet deal also has prompt-
ed charges by Sen. George Mc-
Govern and others that the Agri-
culture Department held up in-
formation on the Soviet transac-
tions and caused some farmers in
the early harvest areas to miss out
on the rising markets by having to
sell their grain at lower prices.

A military-political complex?
Gen. Creighton Abrams, up for nomination as the Army Chief of Staff, talks with Sen. John Stennis
(D.-Miss.), chairman of the Armed Service Committee. Abrams testified before the committee about
his version of the North Vietnamese air raids ordered by Gen. John Lavelle.
'ALEST URE':
POWs to be, escorted hom---e

"An administration committed
to bombs in Indochina and un-
employment at home has decided
to say no to spending more on
programs for the aged," charged
William Oriole yesterday at the
final assembly of the Conference
on Aging.
Oriole, a member of Sen. Frank
Church's (D-Idaho) staff, read
Church's speech as Church was
unable to come to the conference
due to yesterday's lengthy Sen-
ate session.
Oriole states that the results
of the White House Conference

on Aging are commendable, but
that the Nixon administration has
adopted a "this too, shall pass
attitude. They have never direct-
ly stated their goals. Their usual
policy on the aged is no policy."
Church's speech called for an
international conference on aging
in the near future, possibly co-
ordinated through the United Na-
tions.
The speech also called for co-
operation between the U.S. and
the USSR on diseases of the aged
such as heart attacks and lung
cancer.

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 locai mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-locai maii
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: a $5.50 by carrier (canpus
area) ; $6.50 local maili (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other'
states and foreign).

from N.
NEW YORK (A') - Relatives of
three American war prisoners to
be freed by North Vietnam, ac-
companied by three peace activ-
ists, left for Hanoi last night to
escort the liberated pilots back
home.
The wife and the mother of
two of the three imprisoned air-
men were in the entourage led by
antiwar advocates Cora Weiss
and David Dellinger.
They were scheduled to arrive
in Hanoi on Saturday. The father
of the third pilot said he was un-
able to make the 'flight.
Yale University Chaplain Wil-
liam Sloane Coffin, veteran peace
movement spokesman, also was
in the delegation, which was tra-
veling under the sponsorship of
the Committee of Liaison with
Families of Servicemen Detained
in North Vietnam. Weiss and Del-
linger are heads of the commit-
tee,
Dellinger's presence on the jour-
ney was in doubt until yesterday
morning, when a federal appeals
court in Chicago granted the long
time pacifist permission to travel
outside the United States.
Court approval was needed be-
cause Dellinger was free on bail
pending appeal of his Chicago

Vietnam by relatives

Seven conspiracy conviction that
followed the disorders at the 1968
Democratic National Convention.
Dellinger and Weiss said last
week that Hanoi had invited rela-
tives of the POWs to be released
to accompany the committee
members to the North Vietnam-
ese capital.
One prisoner was captured
when his plane was shot down
over North Vietnam last Decem-
ber. Another has been imprisoned
for four years and the third for
three months.
The group was to fly to Hanoi
via Copenhagen, Bangkok a n d
Vientiane and return with t h I
prisohers on Sept. 25.
In New Haven, Conn., before
the flight, Chaplain Coffin told
newsmen he saw nothing wrong
with making statements o v e r
Hanoi radio while in North Viet-
nam. He did not say whether he
intended to make any statements.
The clergymen termed the im-
pending release of the prisoners
"a gesture" and said: "A ges-
tvre calls for some reciprocation.
An appropriate reciprocal ges-
ture might be a halt in t h e
bombing."
Should he speak on'Hanoi rad-
io, he said, it would be "not out

of love for Hanoi, but out of
love for my own country."
The chaplain said he wished
"to make it perfectly clear that
I have never supported Hanoi,"
His own view, he said, was that
the United States "should n o t
support either North Vietnam or
South Vietnam."

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