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September 12, 1972 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-12

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Poge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 12,1972-

Poge Tn THEMICHIAN DALYITuedoy, eptemer 1 , 197

Lui"Mnmmmmmmj I

Report cites pay discrimination
against women and minorities

(Continued from Page 1)
mum salaries-excluding unassign-
ed research positions. Women
make up 61 per cent of the total
P&A staff.
At the same time, only one per
cent of the women are classified
as above "maximum salary in
grade," compared to three per cent
for the entire staff.
The study also found that the
portion of women in each of the
lowest four salary grades ranged
from 63 to 83 per cent. The study
found there were no women in the
highest four levels.
In .an examination of minorities,
the study indicates that minority
group members receive salaries
which are commensurate with their
,salary grades, but they tend to be
concentrated in lower salary levels.
According to the report, 11 per
cent of all minority group persons
are below minimum salary grade,
as compared with 13 per cent of
the entire group. At the same
time, there are no minority staff
members in any of the four highest
classifications, but 20 per cent of
the people in the lowest grouping
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYFL WRITTEN FORM to
409 E. Jefferson, before 2 p.m. of
the day preceding publication and
by 2 p.m. Friday for Saturday and
Sunday. Items appear once only.
Student ;eorganization notices are
noat acceptei for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12
DAY CALENDAR
LSA Coffee Hour: 1054 LSA Bldg., 3-
4:30 pm.
Computing Center Film: "Basic Use
of the IBM 029 Card Punch," Seminar
Rm, Comp. Ctr., 4, 7, 8 pm.
Computing Center Film: "Advanced
Use of the IBM 029 Card Punch,"
Seminar Rm, Comp. Ctr., 4:30, 7:30, &
8:30 pm.
Nuclear Colloquium: M. Harvey, Chalk
River Labs, "Generalized Quartet Mod-
el," P&A Colloq. Rm, 4 pm.
Residential College Renaissance Dra-
ma Films: "Othello," in Russian, Res.
Coil. Aud., 7 pm.
Ctr. for Early Childhood Education
& Development: M. Keyserling, Wash-
ington econ. consultant, "Day Care:
Crisis and Challenge," Aud. 4, Mod.
Langs. Bldg., 8 pm.
U of M Baha'i Student Group meet-
ing: Sept. 15, at 8 pm, Michigan
League conference rooms 3 & 4. Film,
songs, and discussion.
UM Volleyball Club Organ. Meeting,
Thurs. Sept. 21, at 7:30 PM Faculty
Lounge, Mich. Union. All old mem-
bers & new ones welcome.
History Undergraduate Assoc. Mass
Meeting (to approve a constitution an
elect officers). 5:00 PM, Uft MUI-
purpose roam Sept. 14.

are minority group members.
In addition to requesting that
low salaries be raised, the report
proposes that salary increases for
the three per cent of the staff
which is above "maximum salary"
be greatly limited until their
salaries become consistent with
proposed levels.
The report also supplies a com-
plete set of job descriptions for the
classifications it created. Each de-
scription contains the title, basic
function and responsibility, char-
acteristics, related duties and re-
sponsibilities, supervision received
and exercised, and qualifications
required for each position.
Problems of
aged .faced
at meeting
The first day of the three-day
Annual Conference on Aging was
held yesterday at the Rackham
Building. Over -8O0 representatives
of many professional and govern-
ment organizations attended meet-
ings on the problems of advocacy
for older populations in various
cultures and biological considera-
tions of demographic expansion.
A highlight of yesterday's ac-
tivities included. the recognition
of seven "American Pioneers in
Aging" for their past achievement.
Key speakers at the conference,
the nation's oldest academic for-
um devoted to problems of the
aged, include Sen. Frank Church
(D.-Idaho), chairperson of the
Senate Special Commission on Ag-
ing, Dean Wilbur Cohen of the
University's School of Education,
and Arthur Fleming, chairperson
of the White House Conference on
Aging.
Fields to be covered in the re-
maining two days of the confer-
ence include aging and the econo-
my, aging and leisure, and pro-
gress being made toward a na-
tional policy on the aging.
The problems of the elderly have
become a significant issue in this
election year. A 20 per cent Social
Security increase was passed over
the threat of veto by President
Nixon. Further, a bill to provide
free meals to the elderly poor was
vetoed by Nixon, saying the pro-
gram was too costly.
Sen. George McGovern, Demo-
cratic presidential nominee, has
said that he will give an addi-
tional boost in Social Securitydas
a means to help the elderly poor.

Also included in the proposal are*
recommendations for yearly per-
formance evaluations of all staff,
an appeals procedure, and a pro-
cedure for the system itself to ad-
just to future needs.
Virginia Nordin, a chairperson of
the Commission for Women, says
that the findings of the Hayes
study "verify what women have
been saying" about salary in-
equalities.
"All in all it is a report that will
help women on this campus a great
deal," she said.
Nordin interpreted the study's
findings to mean that either wo-
men had been "misclassified" into
low paying jobs or that the ad-
ministratorshad perceived of work
done by women as less important
than similar work done by men.
The Hayes report suggests that
part of the reason for the salary
differences might be that men hold
more seniority in their present
classification than do women. The
report also says that "many clas-
sifications predominantly peopled
by women have been increased in
relativeorder," thus suggesting
that these classifications had pre-
viously been placed at too low a
level.

j'
TROPIC ISLE
O'DELL ALL-GLASS TANK SALE
r r
10 gal. $7.50 20 gal. $16.00
15 gal. $12.00 29 gal. $20.00
r
* ALSO: 10% OFF ALL OTHER EQUIPMENT WITH COUPON.
1731 PLYMOUTH RD. (behind Lum's) 769-4188
* Coupon Good thru September 30
. .I
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,,
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'
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The Union Gallery
First Floor
MICHIGAN UNION
530 South State
Telephone 761-2924
FIRST JURY
The Gallery is accepting art work for the
first jury from September 11 through Sep-
tember 20. Artists may submit their work
at the gallery from 3 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9
p.m. Monday through Friday.

<I

FRE

X.X".
. .... . ...

10 Speed Imported Bicycle FREE
with purchase of new Toyota or "quality checked" used car

72-3 Sasn Oeng ing
Concert. New York
Ph'ilharmonic *Pierre
Boulez Conducting
Saturday evening, September 16, the splendid New York Philharmonic
opens the 94th annual Choral Union concert series in Hill Auditorium.
Pierre Boulez, one of America's most exciting and brilliant conductors,
will be on the podium for the following program: "Benvenuto Cellini"
Overture by Berloiz; Haydn's Symphony No. 31 ("Horn Signal"); Schumann's
Symphony No. 4; and Ravel's "Daphnis and Chloe" Suite No. 2.
Season tickets for 10-concert Choral Union series at $45, $38, $32, $26, $20.
Single concert tickets from $3.50 to $8.50.
(:EkSITY

- DOMESTICS -
'70 CHEVROLET
One-half ton pickup, V-8, 3-
speed, radio, 61 ft. fleetside
box.
$2195
'70 MAVERICK
6-cylinder, automatic, radio,
new tires.
$1595
- FOREIGN and SPORTS -
'72 MERCEDES BENZ
250c 4-door sedan, automatic,
AM-FM radio, 12,000 miles,
beautiful dark green finish,
luggage tan interior.
$6995

'71 DATSUN "510"
2-door s e d a n, low mileage,
priced right.
'69 PORSCHE 911E
5-speed, AM-FM radio, mags,
radial tires, extra sharp, 27,000
actual miles.
$4995
'69 MGC ROADSTER
6-cylinder, with overdrive, wire
wheels, new radial tires, AM-
FM radio, extra clean.
$2495
'66 PORSCHE 911 Coupe
New engine, and transmission,
priced for quick sale.

'64 PORSCHE
356C Coupe
Sharp finish, runs good,
clean for a '64 9
$2295

very

TOYOTAS, 100% warranty
'71 TOYOTA
Corolla 1600 4-door, 4-speed,
a low mileage car.
$1995
'70 CORONA
4-door sedan, automatic, clean
car.
$1895
'69 CORONA
2-door hardtop, 4-speed, bright
red finish, sharp.
$1495

BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR

MON. THRU FRI. 9-4:30; SAT. 9-12

PH. 665-3717

-NOW ON DISPLAY - USED
Open Evenings till 9 p.m.; Sat. till 5 p.m.

1972 MAZDA RX2-
Ann Arbor
907 N. MAIN

__ srb _ --_--
Subs cribe to The Michigan Daily

663-8567

h~._______________________________________________........ -

-- --i .

I

The Housing Office feels that a

I

I

students should be free to concentrate on

academic (and other) pursuits without added worry of dietary requiremen
Therefore, University Residence Halls offer "Optional Meal Contracts"1
any University student.
" available at all Halls
* select one convenient location
* initiate or cancel contract at your request
" select lunch, or dinner, or both

its.
for

" reasonable prices (lunch and dinner meal contract for

a year

would

cost

$2.85 a day). Re-serves on nearly all foods. Salad bars, soft drinks, and soft
serve ice cream available for both meals.

CATCH 22-not really, but we should mention that there are
specified dining hours at each residence.

III

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