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September 12, 1972 - Image 9

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1972-09-12

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Tuesday,;September 12, 1972

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

/ait Respect4 -
The Olympics .. .
... Idealism gone sour
---- - -john papanek
WHAT was to be the most extravagant and colorful 10 days in
the history of sport began and ended in the dazzling $60
million Olympic Stadium in Munich, West Germany.
But though the games of the XXth Olympiad began on a
blazing blue-skied afternoon, they ended yesterday in darkness;
not only darkness of night, but more importantly darkness of
heart, darkness of death, darkness of injustice.
The colors that stick in mind are not those of the billowing
flags, the uniforms of 8,000 athletes, or the rustic drindis of
the Bavarian natives. They are red, for the blood that flowed
from 11 Israeli athletes brutally murdered by a band of Arab
terrorists. And black for. the thundercloud that now hovers
over the International Olympic Committee for prostituting the
healthy ideal of sport as man versus man into a monster
replete with international dirty politics, racism and repeated
abandonment of the spirit of fair play.
Aside from the bloody massacre of the Israeli 11 which may
or may not have -been beyond the control of the West Germans,
a staggering number of other events helped to darken the stain
of the Munich Games.
Judging inconsistencies, in the individual events-gymnastics,
diving' and boxing were incredibly flagrant, with preferences
almost without exception going to athletes from Iron Curtain
countries. The decision with the greatest disblief came when
Russian Valery Tregebov, soundly beaten by American Reggie
Jones, was declared the winner of their middleweight boxing
bout. Ray Russell, another American boxer who knocked down
his opponent six times was also declared a loser.
Not to be outdone, the officials of the basketball tournament
showed unparalleled ineptness in the final 51-50 Soviet Unionj
victory over the United States for the gold medal, that marked
the end of America's 36-year world domination in basketball.
After trailing the entire game, the United States took a 50-49
lead with three seconds left. The Soviets made an inbounds pass
which was deflected at midcourt and the court filled with cheering
fans thinking the game over, though the clock showed one second
left. The court cleared and the clock was set back not to one
second, but to three seconds.
This time the inbounds pass was short and the horn
sounded, signalling apparent victory for the USA. The clock
apparently had not been reset, and again went back to three
seconds. A long pass was thrown to Aleksander Belov who
dropped in the winning basket.
But during the last three-second stint, the officials, a
Bulgarian and a Brazilian, failed to call two violations, both
of which appeared on the videotape of the game. One showed
that the Russian stepped on the base line in making his full
court pass, and the other showed Belov violating the three-
second rule..
The Americans naturally protested, and waited while the
appeals committee, consisting of members from Cuba, Poland,
Puerto Rico, Spain and Italy, overruled the protest. The United
States refused to accept the silver medal, and the West Germans
and the IOC were again left embarrassed for another job
botched up.
If the officiating was bad, the administration was worse.
Overcome by its wealth of power, Avery Brundage and the IOC
ruthlessly dictated absurd rules which only further damaged
the image of the Munich Olympics. With an unprecedented
cascade of divine right, the IOC declared:
- That the pole used for the last eight months by American
vaulter Bob Seagren was illegal, then legal, then illegal again.
-That Vince Matthews and Wayne Collett, American gold and
silver medalists in the 400-meters be banned for life ' from
Olympic competition for "misbehaving during the award cere-
mony." And yesterday, the IOC added 11 Pakistani field hockey
players to that category.
The Olympics is the pinnacle of sport, yet bastardized
into a forum for political quarrels and manic nationalistic
aims. You can empathize with an athlete who failed, like Jim
Ryun, but your empathy runs to rage when the shackles of
bureaucracy and politics get in the way.
Swimmer Rick Demont had to return his gold medal because
the U.S. team doctors never told him that the drug he took for
asthma, ephedrine, was banned by the IOC. Eddie Hart and Ray
Robinson are co-holders of the world record for the 100 meters,
but they did not get a shot for the gold, because they were given
the wrong time schedule.
Sports must be returned to the sportsmen. Let the 1976 games
be an intimate gathering of the world's greatest athletes. Leave
the flags home. Let them play the games.
Professional League Standings

TIGERS SLIP TO FOURTH

Bosto
By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND - Roy Foster hit
a bases-loaded sacrifice fly in the;
sixth inning to break a tie and lift
the Cleveland Indians to a 6-5 vic-
tory over the Boston Red Sox in
an American League game last
night.
The Indians filled the bases on
a single by Buddy Bell, a hit bats-
man, a sacrifice bunt and an in-
tentional walk. The Red Sox got
a double play on Foster's fly. Left-
fielder Ben Oglivie dropped the
baseball but JackHeidemann was
forced at third and Foster was de-
clared out for passing another run-
ner going into second base.
Boston scored twice in the first
with Carl Yastrzemski's two-run
homer but Cleveland answered in
their half inning with three runs

nipped,

0's

win

dail
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
CHUCK BLOOM
including a solo homer by Jackl
Brohamer. Tom McCraw hit a!
two-run homer for the Indians in
the third, then Reggie Smith and
Carlton Fisk hit solo circuits in
the fourth for the Red Sox.
Orioles fly
BALTIMORE - Boog Powell's
three-run homer in the fourth inn-

ing - his first one since Aug. 21
-powered the Baltimore Orioles
to a 3-2 victory over Milwaukee
last night for a sweep of the four-
game American League baseball
series.
Powell rapped his 18th homer, on
a 3-2 pitch from Jim Colburn, 7-6,
after Bobby Grich and Tommyj
Davis singled to open the fourth.!
Mike Cuellar, 16-10, allowed
three of Milwaukee's hits in the
seventh inning as the Brewers
snapped a 31-inning scoreless
streak against Baltimore pitching.
Tigers dripped
DETROIT - Bobby Murcer and
Felipe Alou smashed consecutive
homers on Fred Scherman's first
two pitches of the fourth inning to
snap a 2-1 deficit and lead the!

New York Yankees to a 4-2 vic-
tory over the Detroit Tigers last
night in a game shortened to 5
innings because of rain.
Umpires waited an hour and 43
minutes before calling the game
when rain would not let up.
The loss dropped Detroit to
fourth place for the first time this
season.
Magic Number: 23
New York took a 1-0 lead in the
first inning on consecutive doubles
by Roy White and Murcer.
The Tigers, pulled ahead with
a pair of runs in the bottom of
the inning on singles by Jim
Northrup and Tony Taylor, an RBI
ground out by Gates Brown, and
a double by Duke Sims.
After Murcer led off the Yan-
kees fourth with his 28th homer
of the year, Alou followed with his
fifth of the year and 200th of his
career.
John Callison hit a pinch single
in the fourth to give New York an-
other run after Thurman Munson
walked and stole second.

NEWCOMERS PLENTIFUL:
Rugge rs s e
By CHUCK DRUKIS Huizenga is able
After gaining national recogni- quickly, but nee
tion last year, the Michigan ing in - the pass
rugby football club faces a re- Doyle and Swee
building task this fall, season undert
The ruggers' primary problem could prove in
will be to replace the (Richard) Blue scoring pun
Thompson, (T e r r y) Larrimer, Ross Vickers,
(Peter) Hooper backfield which ging minor inju
gave the Blue a lightning fast past year, has a
offensive punch and a heady de- making a comeb
fense. The forwards
Cleland Child, who hinged the three regulars,
forwards and backs together at perienced depth
scrum half for the past two sea- Gry ndersh
sons, will move to standoff, thus Gary Anderson
giving the backline experienced yar have pro
leadership. A likely successor at sturdy props w
scrum half is second year law dano, John McM
student Todd Peterson, who dis- my Raw are able
played both quickness and agility The hookerp
in last Saturday's victory over battled for by th
Purdue. ruggers, Hank
The Blue's omnipresent outside Gordon, and La
threat Ron Smith, one of the two The remainde
Michigan players named to the yet uncertain e
Midwest Rugby Union All-Star Lawson in the
team, will soon be leaving Ann Vern Plato, the
Arbor to do research in Aus- Star representat
tralia, and thus creating another ward.
gap in the backfield. Other likelys
After two weeks of practice, didates include E
the prime candidates to round Phillipson, and
out the backfield appear to be Tom Raboine an
John Bohlke, Rob Huizenga, Mike may also see so
Doyle, and Mike Sweeny. wing forward sp
Bohlke, also a triple jumper eight post will bi
Ifor the track team, has shown how the rest of1
flashes of blazing speed and will filled out.
probably start at openside wing. Michigan's b

tto, rebuild

to turn corners
ds more season-
ing game. Both
eny have a full
their belts and
valuable to the
inch.
plagued by nag-
uries during the
a good chance of
ack at fullback.
despite losing
have more ex-
to fall back on.
and Chris Peno-
ven themselves
hile Tom Gior-
Vannis, and Jim-
e back up men.
position will be
hree experienced
Lukaski, Dave
rry Lucarelli.
r of the scrum is
except for Quint
second row and
Blue's other All-
tive at wing for-
second row can-
Eric Wallen, Rick
Walt Holloway.
rd Chuck Drukis
me action in the
pot. The number
be determined by
the positions are
iggest weakness

will be kicking extra points and
penalty goals. None of the rug-
gers have yet shown sufficient
prowess to fill the role that had
been shared by Dave Osborn and
Richard Thompson last season.
Michigan will play most of the
first half of the fall schedule at
home with the second half away.
Consequently, the newer players
will be able to lose their early
season jitters in preparation for
NCAA champion Palmer College
in their second to last game of
the year.
Rugby Schedule
Sept. 16-Detroit
Sept. 23-at Toronto
Sept. 30-Cleveland Blues R.F.C.
Oct. 7-Notre Dame
Oct. 14 Michigan State
Oct. 21-at Chicago
Oct. 28-at Chicago Tournament
Nov. 4-at Indiana
Nov. 11-Miami of Ohio
Nov. 18-at Palmer College
Nov. 25-at Ohio State

AP Photo
CHICAGO'S DICK ALLEN is congratulated by teammates after
his first-inning shot over the center field wall in yesterday's 2-1 win
over the Royals.

Mass Meeting
U-M RIDING CLUB
Monday, Sept. 18
7 P.M.
Union Faculty Club
761-9555

Gridde Pickings
ANN ARBOR - Robert "Big Bob" Schreiner, stellar rookie half-
back for the awesome DAILY LIBELS, will be on his way to the Mayo
Smith Clinic next week for possible major surgery to his right knee.
Schreiner was counted on for great things this season because of
his quickness, speed, talent and wit in arguing with the referee.
The injury was suffered during a typical vicious scrimmage as
Art "Evil Finger" Lerner dealt a nasty blow to the leg as the hurt-one
was attempting to block for his QB.
Lerner sneered at the thought of causing injury, saying it was part
and parcel of the game we've come to know and love.
Coach "Long John" Papanek placed Lerner on waivers and added
C. Bubba Constrictor, veteran defensive lineman, to the roster. Con-
strictor is back from an unsuccessful tryout with the Yukon Yahoos
of the Arctic League.
Oh yes, pick a winner (not your nose) here by Friday and win a
xpizza.
P.S. We need bodies for the Sports Staff. Saturday nights can get
lonesome.

American League
East

National League
Z East

Boston
Baltimore
New York
Detroit
Cleveland
Milwaukee

w
73
74
73
72
63
54

L
61
63
64
64
73
83

Pct.
.545
.540
.533
.529
.463
.394

GB
I '7
2
11
20

West

Oakland 79 57 .581 -
Chicago 77 59 .566 2
Minnesota 69 66 .511 91;
Kansas City 66 68 .493 12
California 63 72 .467 15
Texas 51 84 .378 271,
Yesterday's Results
New York 4, Detroit 2, 6 innings
Cleveland 6, Boston 5
Baltimore 3, Milwaukee 2
Minnesota 2, Oakland 1, 1st
Minnesota 3, Oakland 2, 2nd
Chicago 2, Kansas City 1
Tonight's Games
Boston (Tiant 11-4) at New York
(Peterson 14-14)
Cleveland (Wilcox 7-12 and Butler 0-0)
at Milwaukee (Parsons 11-12 and
Ryerson 3-8), 2
Oakland (Hunter 19-7) at Minnesota
(Corbin 8-7)
Chicago (Bahnsen 17-15) at Kansas
City (Montgomery 1-1)
Baltimore (Dobson 15-15) at Detroit
(Fryman 5-2)
Texas (Gogolewski 3-9) at California
(Ryan 16-13)

/

Pittsburgh
Chicago
New York
St. Louis
Montreal
Philadelphia
Cincinnati
Houston
Los Angeles
Atlanta
San Francisco
San Diego

w
86
75
70
64
63
49
83
75
73
64
60
51

L
48
61
64
73
72
87
53
60
62
73
77
83

Pet.
.642
.551
.522
.467
.467
.360
.610
.556
.541
.467
.438
.381

GB!
12
16
23i/
231/2
38
7Y2
9%/
1911
23Y2
31

1. Northwestern at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. UCLA at Pitt
3. South Carolina at Georgia Tech
4. Penn State at Tennessee
5. Toledo at Eastern Michigan
6. MSU at Illinois
7. Minnesota at Indiana
8. Iowa at Ohio State
9. Bowling Green at Purdue
10. Northern Illinois at Wiscon-
sin

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

Arizona State at Houston
Wyoming at Air Force
Duke at Washington
Washington State at
California
San Jose St. at Stanford
Baylor at Georgia
North Carolina at Maryland
Virginia Tech at Virginia
Villanova at Kentucky
Brockport State at
Slippery Rock

West

Yesterday's Results
New York 4, Philadelphia 2
Montreal 4, St. Louis 0
Houston at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
New York (Webb 0-0) at Philadelphia
(Reynolds 2-12)
St. Louis (Santorini 6-10) at Mon-
treal (Morton 6-13)
Los Angeles (John 11-5) at San Fran-
cisco (Bryant 11-6)
Cincinnati (Simpson 8-5) at Atlanta
(Freeman 2-0)
Pittsburgh (Ellis 13-7) at Chicago
. (Hooten 9-12)
Only games scheduled

TRY OUT.. . YOU'LL LIKE IT
JOIN THE MICHIGAN

_ ,
,
i,
I

LSA
OPEN HOUSE
Tuesday
September 12, 1972
Dean's Conference Rm., 2549 ISA Bldg.
LSA First-Year Students
Come and meet the Dean and his Staff. Tell

VARSITY BAND
SPECIAL CONCERT BAND OPEN TO
ALL QUALIFIED UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
AUDITIONS at HARRIS HALL

1311

III

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