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April 12, 1973 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-04-12

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┬░TMuesdoy, April 12, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thursday, April 12, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

to I

tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 FliMtstones
56 Operation Second Chance
6:30 2 CBS News
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 I Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Classroom Meetings
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News
7 To Tell the Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
7:30 2 What's My Line?
4 Circus!!'
7 Michigan Outdoors
9 Movie
"Tarzan and the Green
Goddess" (1938),
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Behind the Lines
8:00 2 National Geographic
"The Haunted West"
4 Flip Wilson
7 Mod Squad
50 Dragnet
56 NET Playhouse
"The Trail of Tears"
8:30 50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Movie
VHow To Save a Marriage-
and Ruin Your Life" 1968
4 Ironside
7 Kung Fu
9 News
9:30 9 Happy Though Married
10:00 4 Dean Martin
7 Streets of San Francisco
9 Pig and Whistle

50 Perry Mason
56 Masterpiece Theatre
10:30 9 Countrytime
11:00 2 47 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:20 9 News
11:30 4 Johnny Carson
7 Possession
50 Movie
"The Man Behind the Gun."
(1952)
12:00 9 Movie
"Cockleshell Heroes" 1955
1:00 4 7 News
1:50 2 Movie
"Spy in the Sky" (1958)
3:20 2 TV High School
350 2 Newps
cable tv
channel 3
3:30 Pixanne
4:00 Today's Woman-
"Tragedy of King Christophe"
4:30 Something Else
5:00 Stratosphere Playhouse
5:30 Local News
6:00 Love and the Law
6:30 NCAA Super Sports
7:00 Community Dialogue-(Principal
Dean Bodley and two students,
and David Martinez, co-ordi-
nator of the local Chicano
movement are guests)
8:00 Wednesday's Ann Arbor School
Board Meeting
vwcbn
89.5 fm
9 The Morning After Show
12 Progressive Rock
4 Folk
7 B.F.Skinner's speech "Learning
for Human Understanding"
8 Jazz
11 Progressive Rock

Andre Previn: Man
behind, the music

l

By KATHRYN RACETTE
In an impromptu question-ans-
wer session last Friday with mu-
sic school students, Andre Previn
dissolved the prevailing inhibi-
tion with his casual nature and
openness and inquiries were di-
rected more to the man than to
the American conductor of the
London Symphony Orchestra.
One particularly provocative
questioner paved the way for
personalized topics when he ask-
ed how Previn made his transi-
tion from a career in jazz and
American films to the European
concert stage, recalling Previn's
exit from Hollywood in 1960.
Without a pause, Previn ask-
ed smugly, "What was his pre-
diction?" and went on to say that
in America "they can forgive
you for being the Boston Strang-
ler but not for having scored a
movie. It's been thirteen years
now," he added. "I think I've
been forgiven."
There is tangible evidenre to
support that statement. Under
his direction, the London Sym-
phony has become the most
widely travelled orchestra in the
world, performing over 120 con-
certs yearly in London and
abroad. The orchestra also re-
cords more and, claims Previn,
programs more contemporary
music than any other major
symphony orchestra.

Debussy opera
The Music School will present Pelleas and Melisande at 8 p.m. in Mendelssohn Friday through Mon-
day.

Asked whether he has contin-
ued to compose jazz and film
music, Previn admitted that al-
though these areas still interest
him they proved the most ex-
pendable in the press for time
caused by his demanding con-
cert schedule. He tries to com-
pose "at least one piece of some
consequence" each year, and
mentioned two concerti in the off-
ing. The composer concedes that
while his own style is "wildly
eclectic," he does not conscious-
ly emulate that of any other
composer.
Several students were curious
as to Previn's opinions on de-
velopments on the pop music
scene. Confessing "no expertise"
in commenting on rock and its
variants, the conductor does ad-
mit to liking "quite a bit of rock
in its own milieu . .. however,
desperate measures to combine
a rock ensemble with orchestra
(as attempted by Frank Zappa
and others) are simply a bore."
On Emerson, Lake and Pal-
mer's renditions of well-known
classics, Previn said simply:
"If someone painted a mous-
tache on a da Vinci, he'd be ar-
rested."
The conductor professed a gen-
uine liking for the recent suc-
cess, "Jesus Christ Superstar,"
calling it "infantile musically,
but endearing." Previn praised
the theatricality of the produc-
tion and found it a "step in an
interesting direction."
A closing remark on popular
music was especially provoking
and, possibly, refreshing, to
School of Music students whose
classroom and performance ex-
periences are generally limited
to the study of "legitimate" art
music. As an unsolicited post-
script to the topic, Previn said:
"I like pop songs very much. A
good song is as valid musically
as a composition for string quar-
tet or orchestra."
Whether or not you agree with
that assertion it derives merit
from the undeniable fact that
one man who believes it has ris-
en from, or, more appropriately,
transferred his creative talents
from a successful career in the

popular idiom to become the in-
ternationally acclaimed conduc-
tor of the London Symphony Or-
chestra. And he still likes the
Beatles.
concer
notes
By GLORIA JANE SMITH
Arts Editor
In the aftermath of superstars
Alice Cooper and Iggy Stooge,
Detroit mellowed down Tuesday
night to a Masonic Aud. con-
cert featuring Procol Harem,
Tranquility and Leo Kottke.
No glam. No glitter. No gim-
micks.
The audience, relatively older
than those I've seen in Detroit of
late, sat back and listened (for
the most part, yes, actually lis-
tened) to the sounds of some
really excellent vocals and in-
strumental virtuosity.
Although no orchestra accom-
panied Procol Harem this time
around, they proved themselves
as fine a quasi-orchestral unit as
ever, with Gary Brooker on pi-
ano, Alan Cartwright on bass, B.
J. Wilson on drums, Mick Grab-
ham on guitar, and Keith Reid
on organ. Brooker's piano and
strong vocals were best when
highlighted, as in "Grand Ho-
tel" (off their new lp), "A Salty
Dog," and "A Lighter Shade of
Pale." The latter two were
dredged out in encores, the
group prefering to build up with
intense instrumentalization and
fairly muted vocals throughout
most of the show. Wilson layed
down some powerful licks, peak-
ing on a solo towards the end of
the set.
Tranquility turned out some
surprisingly tight composition
and high - pitched vocals, with
a bit of vaudeville thrown in for
good measure. And Kottke was
musician par excellence, with
some finger work that brought
out an impressively rich, multi-
leveled sound.

HOW THE WEST WAS WON!
The myth and the truth, as seen by the men who civilized the
West, and lived to regret it!
"As ENTERTAINING
A CASSIDY' "
HELD -New York Mag.
OVER-
3RD IN THE LIFE AND NO SHORTS!
WEEKTIMES OF Judge Bean
a f starts promptly
at 1 pim.-
3 p.m.-5:05
7:05 &9:10

Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If yy are interest-
poetry, and music,
drama. dance, film,
or writing feature
stories about the
arts: Contact arts
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Daily.
THE DETROIT
INSTITUTE OF ARTS
Illustrated Talk
PUBLIC WELCOME
MARIO AMAYA
Director, N. Y. C. Cultural
Center with Q and A
THURSDAY, APRIL 19, 8 P.M.
LECTURE HALL $1.50
(students 60c)
Founders Presentation from
Friends of Modern Art

ARTS

Comiposer' s symposium

mediatrics
ONE DAY IN THE LIFE }
OF IVAN DENISOVICH
7 and 9:30 P.M.
Saturday & Sunday
Nat. Sci. Auditorium
ONLY 75c Tickets on sale at 6 p.m.'

By DONALD SOSIN
The School of Music Composi-
tion Department will play host to
faculty and student composers
from Oberlin College and the
Universities of Iowa and Illinoi
this weekend as the Midwest
Composers Symposium is recon-
vened after a nine-year hiatus.
Originally organized in 1948,
the Symposium brings together
composers for performances and
discussions of their works a n d
gives the public a chance to hear
what kinds of music are being
written elsewhere.
Six concerts will be presented
in the two-day period, beginning
Friday night with a carillon re-
cital at 7:15 p.m. in Burton M,-
morial Tower. Following that,
the U-M Contemporary Directions

Ensemble will perform in Rack-
ham, starting at 8. This concert
replaces the Wind Ensemble con-
cert scheduled for Hill Auditor-
ium that night.
Saturday, the School of Music
Recital Hall will be the scene
for four programs of chamber
music by student composers from
the different schools. The sched-
ule is as follows: 10:30 - Iowa.
1:30 - Michigan. 3:30 - O'berlin.
.8:00 - Illinois. All concerts begin
promptly and are free of charge.
Participants will includehabout
three faculty, seven student com-
posers, and guest contemporary
chamber players from eazh
school.
William Albright is tie coor-
dinator for general arrange-
ments and the U-M portion of the
program.

Previn

A MOTION PICTURE THAT
CELEBRATES THE TIMELESS JOY
OF ORIGINAL INNOCENCE.
"Literally aglow with living tapestries of twelfth-to-thirteenth
century city and country life, the splendors of the Church and
the loveliness of the countryside."-Judith Crist, New York
Magazine /

MIDNIGHT
MOVIE
friday, saturday
doors open 11:45 pm.
"A first feature by Douglas
Trumbull, who was responsible
for many of the best special
effects in '2001,' it retains that
film's awe of the beauties of
space. But it goes several steps
beyond in its witty satire of
Space Age technology.".Rich-
ard Schickel, Life Magazine
An incredible adventure...
that journeys beyond
imagination!
"sdqnt
A UNIVERSAL RELEASE
TECHNICOLOR' q

*.T T T
*T
Ai
*r
*
T
* Fei
k* xr
ara=
ges
* pic c
*matr
of lf
Sot*
sere
* B reKi
* entart
* scae
h seo
*I

* NEW WORLD MEDIA pres
PROGRAM NO. 5--INTERNATIONAL FILM
THIS WEEK
IN IDE WHITE AFR I
FEATURING
"VIVA FRELIMO'
(1972)
mo-the. guerrilla organization of Mozambig
mines developing education and health program
s, where people are fighting to free themselve
domination.
AND
COME BACK, AFRI4
(1960)

a timely and remarkable
of cinema journalism: a
-of-fact, horrifying study
in the black depths of
Africao society. Filmed in
.ain constant danger
st and deportation, COME
AFRICA . . looks deep
he private nightmare and
desperation of a man and
-Time Magazine

Italian Critics A
Film Festival, 1S
Winner of the
film showing the
advance in car
expression and
Canadian Federc
cieties, Vancouv
1959.
Selected by
Barre, Paris, as
Picture of 1960.

cents 'K
SERIES 'K
' K
CA
uer Fhilm etiv
is Cn vlieratde a
" K
RCA
awrld fi oo"th
most sgnifiant 1
ntent, eans o
tec hisufilmThe
ishinlieradtedo
s frot ort- 'Kc
RIAK
)ose Roo
r---U'K
rorld Flm Coo

The composer-conductortattri-
butes his easy transition to the
concert stage to his vast con-
ducting experience with Holly-
wood studio orchestras, which,
he contends, contain some of the
nation's finest musicians. He al-
so believes that "even tenth-rate
music" provides excellent prac-
tice in learning a score quick-
ly and preparing a piece for
performance with limited rehear-
sal time.
Previn said that only in the
United States was his jazz back-
ground subject to criticism as a
prerequisite for his present po-
sitior). In England, nearly all
composers supplement their typ-
ically meager incomes by writ-
ing for films and working with
jazz. He notes that the latter
is considered a more serious mu-
sical idiom in Europe than in the
U. S., an ironic situation con-
sidering the origin of the genre.
For All Career Oriented
MEN & WOMEN
ALTERNATIVE
LIFESTYLES
Symposium
-Living Alone
-Cohabitation (mci.
marriage)
-Communal Living
Experienced panelists;
workshops;
continuing meetings for
those wanting to plan a
new lifestyle together.
FRIDAY--April 13
269 Physics/Astronomy
Bldg.
(on E. University
7 :3 0 p .m . 5 0
Organieed by
Michigan Women In Science

DRAMA-Student Lab Theatre presents Kopit's Chamber
Music today at 4 in the Frieze Arena; U Players present
Cesaire's The Tragedy of King Christophe tonight at 8
In Frieze Trueblood.
CINEMA-AA Film Coop shows Gilroy's Desperate Characters
tonight at 7, 9 in Aud. A.; Cinema Guild and Future
Worlds show When Worlds Collide tonight at 7, 9:05 in
Arch. Aud.; New World Film Co-op shows Super Show
tonight at 7:30, 9:30 in Aud. 3, MLB; South Quad films
shows Summer of '42 at 7, 9, 11 in Dining Rm. 2.
MUSIC-Residential College Singers in concert tonight at 8
in North Cafeteria, East Quad; Blind Pig presents John
Nicholas tonight; Ark presents George Koppel tonight
at 9.
ISRAELI-SPECIAL-Israel Now and Israel 25th Anniversary
Celebration-Israel student programs, folk singing, danc-
ing at Union at 8.
POETRY-Poet Greg Orr gives a reading today at 4 in the
UGLI multi-purpose room; Robert Hayden reads tonight
at 8 at the Pyramid Gallery.

PLUS-A SPEAKER FROM NIGEI

FRIDAY ONLY
8:00 P.M.
REE

Multi-purp
3rd Floor

sponsored by New W

rir t* t* k k k **yAr *ytntr** * r* t lr* 1r** t** *** Ar icir nlrfHt r t' * '
__ _

MATINEE SEATS AVAILABLE
OFMCIAiN PROFESSIONAL TEAREP'R1G'A
"GREAT, UNEQUIVOCABLY GREAT"-CUVE BARNESN.Y. TIMES
"A HILARIOUS ROMP"-.TIME MAGAZINE
"TOTAL ENTERTAINMENT...HILARIOUS...
GUARANTEED TO CONVULSE YOU"-NEWSDAY
MAeIOAI Fff'lK I K FALES

featured in .;
this month's h :"
Playboy. .a,7
See it while{
0 :
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plus ALL ABOUT SEX'!
Mine Mg 482-3300
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e

PARAMOUNT PcTURr asom A iM BY
HIS FIRST FILM SINCE "ROMEO & JULIET"

plus chapter 11
of "FLASH GORDON"
not continuious'

m

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