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March 29, 1973 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-29

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Page Two

I HE MICHIGAN DAILY

I hursday, March 29, 19713

I

Page Two IHE MICHIGAN DAILY I hursday, March 29, 1 973

MANSFIELD PROTESTS:
U.S. bombing raids debated

By AP and Reuter protection of U.S. troops was a pri- continued air attacks.
WASHINGTON - Defense Secre- mary function of air activities ... "By what authority
tary -Elliot Richardson and Senate but we now have in Cambodia a ed States carrying on
Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield situation which is a kind of linger- activities in Cambodi
disagreed sharply yesterday over ing corner of the war." ed. "Does the Presid
the Nixon administration's consti- Richardson said the raids were as the kings of old -t
tutional authority to bomb Cam- being conducted in response to a mander In Chief he
bodia. request from the Cambodian gov- American forces anyw
Mansfield said that authority is ernment, whose troops were under purpose that suits him
"stretched pretty far at the pre- increasingly heavy communist pres- White House spokes
sent time" and will disappear en- sure. Ziegler said the Unite
tirely when the last U.S. troops The two men talked separately continue bombing inC
leave South Vietnam. to newsmen at the Capitol. long as the Lon Nol go
Richardson said he believes such Their comments came a day af- quests it.
authority exists and that it is not ter Sen. William Fulbright (D-Ark.) The White House n
based entirely on the need to pro- threatened to call Secretary of bombing is justified
tect U.S. troops in the field. State William Rogers before a pub- communists have noti
Asked about the bombing decision lic hearing unless the administra- a ceasefire declared1
Richardson told reporters: "T h e tion explains how it justifies the, The Defense Departn

is the Unit-
any military
a?" he ask-
ent assert -
that as Com-
can order
vhere for any
n?"
man Ronald
d States will
Cambodia as
vernment re-
maintains the
because the
responded to
by Lon Nol.
:ment conced-

PRICES PLUNGE
Boycott supported
By The Associated Press
Plans for next week's national meat boycott gained momen
tum yesterday as midwest hog markets reported a second straigh
day of plummeting prices.
Market officials called the price declines unprecedented and
said it appeared farmers had panicked and were flooding the
market, propelling prices for live hogs on a downhill skid.
It was too soon to tell whether the lower prices at the stock-
yards would lead to lower prices at meat counters, since there is
a lapse of a few days between the time the live animal is sold,
slaughtered, processed and transported to the supermarket.
In Chattanooga, Tenn., a group called Housewives for Lower
Food Prices tried to move up the starting date of the April 1-7
boycott to Thursday.
In Iowa, where hog prices were down $3 and $4 per hundred-
weight from Tuesday's sliding prices, a spokesman, at the Des
Moines market attributed the falling prices to "panic selling and
a lack of confidence in what the market will be tomorrow and
next week."
The national boycott picked up official support in some states.
The Maine House of Representatives voted 108-27 to recognize
and support April 1-7 as "Meat Boycott Week."
But in California, Gov. Ronald Meagan said he opposed the
consumer boycotts. "If I am right, and I think I am, acts of God
had something to do with the present food prices. I'm not in favor
of boycotting Him."
TONIGHT ONLY!!

This is NOT An April Fool's Joke!!
Association of Jewish Graduate Students
FACULTY-GRAD PURIM PARTY
has been re-scheduled to
Sunday, April 1st-8:30 p.m.
1429 Hill Street
ADMISSION: FOOD (no meat or shellfish please) WINE, or $1.50
CALL 663-4129 FOR DETAILS

i

-1

Nixon urges merger
of anti-drug activities

WASHINGTON, (R e u t e r) -
President Nixon yesterday asked'
Congress to merge all federal anti-
narcotics law enforcement activ-
ities into.a single agency to con-
duct all-out war against "mod-
ern-day slave traders" traffick-
ing in illegal drugs.
He submitted a reorganization
plan that would place all federala
bureaus and agents involved in
fighting drug abuse into a new
D r u g Enforcement Administra-
tion (D.E.A.) responsible to At-
torney General Richard Klein-
dienst.
The plan will go into effect un-
less Congress vetoes it within 601
days.
The President said in a message
to the Senate and House that the
anti-drug campaign had made pro-
gress but was losing effectiveness
because several overlapping bu-
reaus were involved.
His plan would put the Bureau'
of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs,
the Office for Drug Abuse Law
Enforcement, the Office of Na-
tional Narcotics Intelligence, cus-
toms, agents involved in the anti-
narcotics drive and others under
a new administrator - to be nam-
ed later -- in the Justice Depart-
ment.
It would also strengthen efforts1
of the Federal Bureau of Investi-
gation (FBI) in investigating the

ed yesterday that U.S. bombers
might be hitting supplies intended
for North Vietnamese forces re-
maining in South Vietnam under
the ceasefire agreement.
Pentagon spokesman Jerry Fried-
hem said there was no wayi to
separate supplies into those for
Cambodia and those for border
areas.
"We can't separate trucks on the
trail and ask which way they in-
tend to turn off," Friedheim said.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone* 764-0562. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan. 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier (campus area); $11 local mail
(in Mich. or Ohio); $13 non-local mail
(other states and foreign).
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5.50 by carrier (campus
area); $6.50 local mail (in Mich. or
Ohio); $7.50 non-local mail (other
states and foreign).

D. BPRODUCTIONS
Spring JAZZ Concert

I

SUNDAY, APRIL 1 - 8:30 p.m.
Featuring JULIAN
CANNONBALL
ADDERLY

4

I

HERBIE MANN ALL ON

HERBIE MANN

I

MASON IC
AUDITORIUM

LES McCANN SAME
SHOW
TICKETS: $5.50 - $6.50 ON SALE AT
-J.L. HUDSON, GRINNELL'S, MASONIC Box Office
NOTE: Tickets on sole day of show from 4 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.

F,

Il

President Nixon

relationship between drug traf-
ficking and organized crime.
Nixon said the single unified
command he proposed would re-
place a loose alliance among gov-
ernment agencies in the fight
against a resourceful and elusive
world-wide enemy.
"Drug abuse is one of the most
vicious and corrosive forces at-
tacking the foundations of Ameri-
can society today," the President
said.

" a
GET
ATTENTION

I

I

MUSKET '73

DUSTIN HOFFMvAN IME[ BIG NMAN"

Modern Languages Bldg.
Aud. 3
(E. WASHINGTON AT
THAYER, ANN ARBOR)

7:15 & 9:30 P.M.
$1.25
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP

West

Side

Story

APRIL 5--B

"A WILD, WILD, ALL STAR EPIC. NEWMAN BRILLIANT!"
va" 1 & --James Bacon, L.A.Herald-Examiner

Join The Daily Ad Staff
P hone 764-0558

I I

IN THE LIFE AND TIMES OF
TAINING AS
'BUTCH mdI NOW SH

Tickets Available Power Center Box Office

A-dmll. Ammb VA'"' (9

I

a

91 1

OWING

CASSIDY'"
---Judith Crist,
New York Magazine

SHOWS AT
1, 3, 5,7,9 P.M.
SAT. & SUN. AT
7 & 9 P.M. ONLY

I

From the New York Times
By ROGER GREENSPUN

0

PRESENTS:

UBIAH HELP
WITH
SPECIAL GUEST STARS
Billy Preston & McKendree Spring
April 7, 8:00 P.M. at
E: M. U. BOWEN FIELDHOUSE
RESERVED SEAT TICKETS:
$3, $4, $5. May be purchased at:
McKinney Union, J. L. Hudson,
Huckelberry Party Store, & Ann Arbor Music Mort
MAIL ORDERS:
Send self-addressed envelope & check or money order to:
Office of Student Life, McKinney Union

AV#. JARDNER
(Lhy Langtry)

T, HUNTER
(Sam Dodd)
JOHN '-i"1STON
(Grizzly Adam)

11

"Fellini's Roma" is perhaps
three-quarters Fellini and one-
quarter Rome; a very good pro-
portion for a movie. Although
an appreciation of the city in-
forms every part of the movie,
Rome is not so much the subjevt
as the occasion for a film that
is not quite fiction and surely
not fact, but rather the cele-
bration of an imaginative col-
laboration full of love and awe,
suspicion, admiration, exaspera-
tion and a measure of well-qual-
ified respect.
It is also, for me, the most
enjoyable Fellini in a dozen
years, the most surprising, the
most exuberant, the most beau-
tiful, the most extravagantly
theatrical. The audience I saw it
with kept interrupting the film
with applause. This isn't some-
thing you normally do at the
movies, but it seems proper
enough for "Fellini's Roma."
"
It is altogether t y pic al of
Fellini that he should film his
"Roma," his tribute to a great
city, mostly indoors on a sound
stage. When he does go outside,
he treats the very streets as a
sound stage, with unreal lights
and shadows playing over the
facades.
Or he turns to the process of
his own filmmaking, to intro-
duce a further element of the
fantastic into a landscape that

might already seem fantastic
enough. Thus, in a sequence
showing the Raccordo Anulare,
a great highway skirting Rome,
jammed with traffic in a stormy
twilight, the subject becomes the
camera c r a n e itself, with its
spotlights, its plastic rainshield
flapping wildly in the wind, like
some extraordinary, swooping,
probing monster.
"Fellini's Roma" begins with
the young Fellini in the north,
in Rimini, first learning about
Rome in school, from friends or
from conversations overheard in
taverns. It follows Fellini as a
young man (played by Peter
Gonzales) in his introduction to
the city at the beginning of
World War II, and then it con-
tinues in more or less self-con-
tained sequences, shifting back,
and forth between the present
and the not-so-distant past. Fel-
lini, the real Fellini, makes a
brief appearance, and there are
celebrity spots for Gore Vidal
and Anna Magnani (a bad idea),
but mostly we are in the pres-
ence of what excites the direc-
tor's imagination and his mind.
"Roma" gives the director's
mind a kind of freedom I have
seen in no other Fellini movie.
Its capacities for pleasure and
terror, for sympathy and irony,
are all perfectly met in "Roma,"
where, for example, a strange
conceit called an Ecclesiastical
Fashion Show begins with roller-
skating priests ("They move
faster to Paradise") and ends

I

dfr
F-
STACY KEACH RODDY McDOWALL
(Original Bad Bob) (Lawyer Frank Glass)

BRUNO
(The Watch Bear)

with a marvelously delicate, in-
tricate, heraldic float construct-
ed of human skeletons; or where
the waiting room of any brothel
(there are two, a fancy one and
a poor one) seems a, teeming
antechamber to heaven's portal
or hell's gate. It is as if Rome
in the 20th century were the
last great expression of the late
Middle Ages.
But there is also the ancient
world, and its modern counter-
parts, and perhaps no other
image in the film really matches
one brief glimpse of a monu-
mental Fellini whore standing in
the midst of fallen stone heads
and torsos, no more permanent
or wonderful than she, in a
rain-driven field outside Rome.
Yet there is another image,
a face, a fresco at the bottom of
a shallow pool of clear water,
part of an ancient Roman villa
uncovered in subway excavations
(this is all artifice) explored by
the Fellini production crew.
What matters is not the face
itself; but the sense of wonder
that Fellini not only offers, but
also shares, as if that were why
he makes movies in the first
place. I suspect that is why
there are so many journeys of
discovery-a short ride, a walk
into the past or another world-
in Fellini's work; and why
"Roma," which is almost wholly
a journey of discovery, seems so
richly to epitomize his career.
THRIFTY THURSDAY
All Seats 75c
before 6:00 p.m.
THURS.-1 :30, 3:30,
5:30, 7:30, 9:30

i

ANTHONY PERKINS
(Rev. LaSalle)

VICTORIA PRINCIPAL
(Marie Elena)

V'anessa Redgraxve Gndajackson

h

The Fall of the Roman Empire
1931-1972

"Two fine actresses, Vanessa Red-
grave and Glenda Jackson, give
force and substance ... Redgrave's
Mary is regal, nervous, passionate,
uncertain-a delicate creature who
becomes indomitable only in death
.. Jackson's Elizabeth is cunning,
complex, intriguing - a monarch
whose desire for power is both a
motivating force and a tragic flaw."
Joy Cocks, TIME

"Two of the most phenomenal ac-
tresses of the decade . . . a rare
cinematic experience."
-- NGENUE
"A truly extraordinary film in every
way, a great directorial achieve-
ment. Brilliant acting . . . without
question one of the year's (1972)
best."
--AFTER DARK

k
fig'
t

I

FRI.-7:30, 9:30

SAT. and SUN.
5:30, 7:30, 9:30

14

"FELLINI'S ROMA"

i/ -x . .Y~ "The mststunningly efetvac-
-*'i; "--. --

11 ri'UhTI.I 'rl'I Iu

I

I I

I I_ ----- - - - - -

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