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March 28, 1973 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-28

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IA

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 28, 1973

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 28, 1973

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Utah 84403.
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ADDED OFFENSE

Gridders seek

passing profi

By BRIAN DEMING
Passing, passing, and more
passing. That's the emphasis thus
far of spring football as Michi-
gan's gridiron heroes prepare for
the April 21 spring game. Aerial
tactics are expected to play a
key role in Michigan's 1973 foot-
ball strategy to compliment the
Wolverines' everpresent, awe-
some running game.
Dennis Franklin, backed up by
Tom Slade, has led the spring-
time quarterbacks. Paul Seal, Gil
Chapman, and Greg Denboer,
among others have been primary
targets on the receiving end of
the aerial barrage.
Coach Bo Schembechler has
not forgotten the famous Michi-
gan ground attack while in pur-
suit of an improved passing
game. The quarterback option,
among the usual repotoire of
running plays, has been prac-
ticed extensively. Such familiar
names as Ed Shuttlesworth,
Chuck Heater, Harry Banks, Bob
Thornbladh from last year's
squad as well as Gordon Bell

from the freshman team have
peopled what may prove to be
the most respected backfield in
the Big Ten.
Michigan's offensive success in
the fall could depend on the per-
formance of the offensive line.
The loss of All-American tackle
Paul Seymour, center Bill Hart,
and guard Tom Coyle leave gaps
in the offense that must be
solved this spring.
"Both lines have a lot of work
to do," commented coach Schem-
bechler after yesterday's action.
Apparently positions on both of-
fense and defense are still in-
secure.
220-pound sophomore Dennis
Franks has so far garnered the
centering duties while Dave Metz
and returnee Mike Hoban have
filled the guard positions.
At tackle Jim Coode, of course,
returns as 243-pound Curtis Tuck-
er presently occupies the gap
left by Paul Seymour.
In the defensive backfield Dave
Brown, Roy Burks, George Koss,
Barry Dotzauer, Tom Drake, and

Dave Elliott will be competing
for positions.
Craig Mutch is anchoring the
linebacking corp while Dave Gal-
lagher is a solid member of the
defensive line.
Defensive end Walt William-
son has been hampered by a
shoulder injury forcing him to sit
out recent practices. The serious-
ness of the injury has not yet
been determined.
Bob Wood, kicking specialist on
last season's freshman team, ac-
companies veteran Mike Lantry
for placekicking duties.

Bo Schembechler and his staff
were not idle this winter and
managed to recruit a number of
outstanding freshmen. These
players are eligible to compete
on the varsity.
Among the nine high school
players who have signed letters
of intent to play at Michigan are
twotfrom Ypsilanti High School,
Greg Boik, a 6-5, 245 pound guard
and Jim Hall, a 6-4, 230-pound
tackle.
Keeping with Michigan's re-
cent tradition, three prospects
are natives of Ohio. They are.

ciency
quarterback Jerry Zuver, 6-3,
187-pounds from Archibald High,
Gary Zolciak, a 6-7, 235-pound
defensive tackle at Toledo Cen-
tral, and Jim Hackett, a 6-2, 220-
pound fullback at London High.
The practices thus far have
been serious business. Technique
was the primary concern in the
first few days and only recently
have regular scrimages taken
place.
No weakness is excused as the
simplest mistake is answered by
an irate coach bellowing 1n terms
clearly indicating the flaw in the
performance. Perfection is not
glorified-perfection is expected.
If a staffmember should miss a
trace of failure in the perform-
ance of an individual, a camera-
man perched atop a crane at one
end of the field will record the
misdemeanor.
The cool but comfortable spring
weather, though, has invited a
substantial number of fans to
come down to the practice field
and witness the violence while
enjoying the sun. Various coaches
from colleges such as Ohio Uni-
versity and Hillsdale along with
coaches from numerous high
schools have watched from the
sideline. Some students and alum-
ni crowd the tiny set of bleachers
trying to catch a glimpse inside
of the season to come.

L.

A

Twin's Perry comes to Detroit;
L.A. sends Dietz to Braves
By The Associated Press
* LAKELAND, Fla. - The Detroit Tigers obtained former Cy
Young Award winner Jim Perry from the Minnesota Twins Tuesday in
a straight one-for-one trade for minor league pitcher Dan Fife.
General Manager Jim Campbell, who announced the trade, said
Perry had agreed to the trade and is expected to report to the Tiger
training camp here Wednesday. Fife, a right-hander and a former
University of Michigan basketball co-captain, will report to the Twins'
Orlanda farm club, he said.
Perry, a 36-year-old right hander, had a 13-16 record and 3.34
earned run average last year. He won the Cy Young Award as best
pitcher in the American League in 1978 when he had a 24-12 record.
His brother Gaylord won the award last year with Cleveland.
" VERO BEACH, Fla. - The Los Angeles Dodgers sold veteran
catcher Dick Dietz to the Atlanta Braves for an undisclosed amount
of cash Tuesday.
Dietz, 31, had appeared in only four exhibition games with the
Dodgers, collecting two hits in 10 at bats. He batted .161 last season
with Los Angeles after six years with the San Francisco Giants.
The sale of Dietz leaves the Dodgers with three catchers - Steve
Yeager, Joe Ferguson and Chris Cannizzaro.

GET

TOGETHER!

AP Photo
Youth Movement
Along with the acquisition of youthful Jim Perry earlier in the day,
the senile Bengals signed rookie George C. Scott as a free agent.
Scott, known for his Patton(ted) three-strikes-your-out swing should
bolster the Tiger's team speed. To make room"for Scott, Norm Cash
was sent to the Triple-A old age home.

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M iehifiSh
By MARK RONAN
Recent American history has
seen a select few of our fellow
countrymen translate their aquatic
skills into sources of fame and not
inconsiderable w e a lt h. Johnny
Weismuller, Buster Crabbe, Esther
Williams, Mark Spitz, and even
Lloyd Bridges emerged from the
pool waters and, barely pausing to
dry, strode to their respective sta-
tions in the hall of national folk
heroes.
Perhaps nothing of this sort is
likely to befall the members of
Michifish, one of the intramural
sports clubs, though it would not
be for lack of talent on the part of
the club members.
The club itself is comprised of
swimmers who share an interest in
the competitive and performing as-
pects of synchronized swimming.,
Last fall, the prospective mem-
bers came together and participat-
ed in a series of tryouts from
which the final membership was
selected. Since that time, they
have extensively practiced the
strokes utilized in synchronized
swimming while attempting, in

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RACKHAM STUDENT GOVERNMENT

The University of Michigan
school of Music Presents
Debussy's Exquisite Masterpiece
PELLEAS AND MELISANDE
opera in English
Josef Blatt, conductor
Ralph Herbert, stage director
April 13, 14, 15 & 16, 8:00 p.m.
MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

present extravaganza
general, to perfect their swimming works for this week's perform-
skills. ances. The swimming numbers, all
From time to time, the club of which were written by individ-
holds clinics, with Eastern Michi- uals in the club, relate to the cen-
gan, Michigan State, and a num- tral theme. Varying numbers of
ber of high schools. Later this club members will take part in
spring, the club plans to compete each production, ranging from a
in the Women's Intercollegiate maximum of approximately twen-
Synchronised Swimming Cham- ty-five to a solo performance by
pionships. Patti Wessels.
At present, however, the swim- Direction and supervision has
mers are primarily concerned with come from Joyce Lindeman with
the annual synchronized swimming j the assistance of Mary Lou Hellie.
performance scheduled for tomor- Others who have contributed to the
row, Friday, and Saturday, March direction are Alice Dever and Jor-
29-31. A large portion of the club's Ja Howe.
recent activities have been devoted The Michifish performance be-
to the upcoming performance. "Vi- gins at 8:15 at the Margret Bell
sions of Future Passed" will serve Pool on the evenings indicated pre-
as the overall theme with special viously. Michifish will most likely
emphasis to be placed on facets of draw a watery rave, for anything
American Heritage. Buster, Esther, and Lloyd did they
Several productions are in the can do better.
White athletes prep
for S. African Open
NEW YORK (P) - In what could rector of the United States Wrest-
develop into a racial controversy, a ling Federation, an arm of the
group of United States swimmers, NCAA, Massary and Strobel are
divers and wrestlers - all white - NCAA wrestling champions. Jerry
is preparing to compete in the Hubbard, a black wrestling cham-
South African Open Games. pion from Michigan, turned down
The wrestlers - Mark Messary an invitation to compete, saying
of Northwestern, Rich Laainger of academic commitments were keep-
Wisconsin and Greg Strobel, Jim ing him busy.
Hagen and Jim Crunley of Oregon A decision by the Amateur Ath-
States - are due to leave Friday, letic Union is expected Wednesday,
said Myron Roderick, executive di- according to Tuesday's New York
---- --_--- Times, on whether to approve tra-
vel permits for five track and
field athletes for what has been
UM BARBERS labeled as a multiracial meet.
AND STYLISTS Because of South Africa's policy
of, apartheid - the separation of
OPEN TODAY the races - black African nations
have condemned the games as a
Aygovernmental smokescreen and
Michgan nion they are being boycotted by ath-
ichig an U nion letic organizations such as soc-
cer's Federal International Foot-
-- --- - ball Association.
It is believed that the AAU will
vote to withold the permits for the
A. track and field stars, a group head-
ed by pole vaulter Steve Smith,
holder of the world indoor record.
By granting permits for the
American athletes, the AAU,
which controls international track
and field in the United States, is
risking alienation with black Afri-
can nations, with whom it has de-
veloped strong sports exchanges in
recent years, and with black offi-
cials and athletes within its own
organization as well.

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1973

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Information 764-6118

Candidates are needed for the following positions:
PRESIDENT and VICE-PRESIDENT

Mail Orders: School of Music
Opera, Mendelssohn Theatre, Uni-
versity of Michigan, Ann Arbor,
MI 48104. Enclose stamped, self-
addressed envelope.
Box office opens 12:30 p.m. April 9

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JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9:00 P.M

(Running as a

slate)

EXECUTIVE BOARD
Biological and Health Services-i position open.
Social Sciences-3 positions open.
Education-i position open.
Physical Science and Engineering-2 positions open.
Humanities---3 positions open.
Filing Deadline: Friday, March 30, 1973.
Elections to be held by mail April7-17th.

deep tones and long sleeves
. . .a winning sport shirt
combination, especially when
paired with contrasting
light color spring slacks.
Long point collar, two-button
cuff. Navy, wine, brown or
green permanent press
polyester/cotton. S,M,L. 6.50

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