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March 24, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-24

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Doge Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, March 24, 1973

rageE~gt TH MIHIGA DALY Sturay, arc 24,197

McCord
pledges
disclosure,
(Continued from Page 1)
into the small courtroom, listened
in an atmosphere of rising tension
as the judge read McCord's letter
announcing his willingness to dis-
close more facts about the case.
McCord said in his letter to the
judge, "several members of my
family have expressed fear for my
life if I disclose knowledge of the
facts in this matter, either pub-
licly or to any government repre-
sentatives."
McCord said that while he did
not share the fears of his family
to the same degree, he believed
retaliatory measures would be
taken against him, his family and
friends for saying what he knew.
McCord explained his decision
to speak to the judge rather than a
government official by saying: "I
cannot feel confident in talking
with an FBI agent, in testifying
before a grand jury whose U. S. at-
torneys work for the Department
of Justice or in talking with other
government representatives."
There was perjury during the
trial in highly material matters,
McCord said. "Others involved in
the Watergate operation were not
identified during the trial, when
they could have been by those
testifying."
Judge Sirica said his lips would
not be sealed no matter whom Mc-
Cord implicated. After the private
meeting between himself and Mc-
Cord, the judge said he would de-
cide what information he would
make available.
President Nixon has refused to
allow any of his White House aides
to testify before congressional com-
mitxees on the affair. Acting FBI
Director L. Patrick Gray told the
Senate Judiciary Committee on
Tuesday he handed over the bu-
reau files on the politically-charged
case to White House Counsel John
Dean.
Hunt today made an impassion-
ed plea for clemency, asking that
he be placed on probation in order
to remain at home and care for
his four children, left motherless
when Ms. Hunt was killed in a.
plane crash on December 8. .
Discussing his four children,
Hunt said: "I ask that they not be
without a father as well."

Prof. Cosand DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

leaves HEW

V:":

(Continued from Page 1)
Sidney Marlin.
le spent four months here as
director of the Center for the Study
of Higher Education before ac-
cepting the post in January 1972.
He had spent 23 years as president
of four different community col-
leges in California and the midwest
and had served as chairman of the
board of the American Council on
Education.
In Washington Cosand worked on
liaison between the government
and the American higher educa-
tion community concerning forth-
coming legislative action on the
education amendments. "I was
t there to do what I could to help
the amendments pass and reflect
hasfar as possible the needs of
higher education," he said.
He traveled extensively around
the U. S. getting input from educa-
tors and met monthly with 50 to
60 college representatives "bridg-
ing educators and government on
1 priorities and needs for the pro-
posed legislation."
The 22 amendments were passed
by Congress in June 1972 and sign-
ed by President Nixon.
Cosand remained in Washing-
ton to organize task forces to is-
sue papers to institutions affected
by the amendments, to establish
rules, regulations and guidelines
and "to be prepared for implemen-
tation of legislation when and if
the different segments were re-
AP Photo commended for funding," Cosand'
says.

SATURDAY, MARCH 24
DAY CALENDAR
Education: Saturday Seminars: T.
Herndon, MEA, "Collective Negotiations
in Education," Schorling And., SEB,1
10 am.
Rugby: Michigan vs. Chicago Lions,'
Palmer Field, Forest , Ave. behind
Mosher - Jordan, 1 :30.
Professional Theatre Prog.: "Ap-
plause," Power, 3. 8 pm.
Trotter House: Black poetry reading,
'rrotter House, 3:30 pm.
Malco lmson
leavlhes AIJ
(Continued from Page 1)
tension of the period of study for
the master's degree from five to
six years.
Malcolmson received a master of
science degree in architecture in
1949 at the Illinois Institute of
Technology and in 1961 was award-
ed a fellowship by the Graham
Foundation for Advanced Studies in
the Fine Arts to study the linear
principles of city planning.
While dean, Malcolmson says, he
has not been able to spend as much
time as he would like on architec-
ture, so later this year he will take
a leave of absence to prepare a
display of his architecture. This
display will include his work in the
past 25 years and' will go on tour
in the United States and Canada
beginning early next year.

Music School: J. Conwell, soprano,
SM Recital Hall. 4:30 pm.
Gilbert & Sullivan Small Co.: Gil-
oert & Groschmit's "Haste to the wed-
fling," Mich. Rm., League, 8 pm.
Music School: Men's Glee Club, w.
Pattersen, director, Hill, 8 pm.
Music School: A. Hofmeister, soprano,
SM Recital Hall. 8 pm.
Musical Society: Chamber Art Series,
Aeolian Chamber Players, Rackham
Aud., 8:30 pm.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 SAB
Interviews: register by phone, 763-
4117, or in person. Camp Sequoia, Mi.
Coed, Will interview Mar. 29. 9:30 to 5.
Openings in riding (western), arts and
craft, cook, field sports, camperaft, na-
ture.
Camp Tamarack, Silverman village
Prog., Livonia. Will interview here Mar.
28, 9 to 5, counseling emotionally dis-
turbed children. Following openings
avail., waterfront (WSI), arts and
crafts and gen. counselors (m).
Good Humor Company, Detroit. Will
interview Mar. 27. 9 to 5.
Camp Ma-Hi-Ya, Michigan Soc. Wk.
Will interview Mar. 29, 1:30 to 9. Open-
ings for gen. counselors. Many spe-
cialty fields.
Camp Plagens Wis. Coed. Will inter-
view Mar. 30. 1:30 to 5; arts/crafts, ar-
chery, riding, camperaft, swimming,
nature and others.
ANNOUNCEMENTS: Royal4 Oaks Golf
Camp, Waupaca, Wis. Instructing coun-
selors, for golf, tennis, archery, base-
all, swimming.
Portland Maine. Urban Summer
Planning Prog. for graduate students
in Public admin., govt., law, pol. sci.,
planning.
Harris Trust and Savings, Chicago.
Harris Summer Banking Prog. for grad.
students; projects include capitol bud-
geting, systems res., market res., mer-
ger & acquisition studies and port-
folio mgt.

17 ' CLIP AND SAVE-n .
U r
I ,
Pone Numbers
Circuaio~nrn
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gr
er
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C A
* I'
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*- - ILP N SY

8

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Yankee go home!
A crowd of Indians surrounds the U.S. embassy in New Delhi to protest renewed sales of
arms to neighboring Pakistan. Placards in the crowd included the one above addressed to
Ambassador Daniel Moynihan.

American
new U.S.

CHARTER AMENDMENT:
City voters to decide transit issue

(Continued from Page 1) right direction and expect both
In more developed neighborhoods, propositions to pass. All of the
special markings on the existing Democratic candidates are indi-
pavement will designate bicycle vidually supporting both proposi-
lanes. tions A and B," said Beals.
Another $630,000 will be used for' Republican Councilman Lloyd
repairs to the Stadium and Broad- Fairbanks, who acknowledges he
way bridges in the form of new is regarded as the minority lead-I
deck structures. Other smaller er on city council but insisted he
projects include "safety sidewalks" was not speaking for the party,I
near schools, and wheelchair said the Republicans had not tak-I
ramps for the handicapped. en a position either for or against
Speaking for city Democrats, Dr. the propositions.
Ted Beals said his party supports "On city council the Republicans
both propositions, although they took a position opposed to Propo-
have no wishes for the proposals sition B, but decided Proposition
to be partisan issues. B be left up to the voters," Fair-;
"These are city-wide issues, and banks said.
we feel they are a step in the Human Rights Party Councilman

Jerry DeGrieck said HRP supports
both proposals, primarily because
they are "progressive" steps to-
ward finding alternative forms of
transportation other than the au-
tomobile.
"Because the property tax is
very regressive, we want to make
sure the tax increases asked for
in these proposals are earmarked
for needed human services - in
this case, transportation," De-
Grieck said.
"We still feel, however, that
these services should be commun-
ity controlled and are pushing for
the Ain Arbor Transportation Au-
thority to become controlled by
the people it serves," he added.
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN
SMALL COMPANY
presents
'Haste to the Wedding'
A farcial operetta by
W. S. Gilbert & George Grossmith
Fri. & Sat., March 23 & 24
Michigan Room of the League
8:00 p.m.--$1.00

MR.PIZZA
TONIGHT -
CARNAL KNOWLEDGE

0

Order
Your
Subscription
Today
764-0558

original works of graphic art-etchngs, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists:

University
Ref ormed
Church
1001 E. Huron
AT FLETCHER

Pablo Picasso
Salvador Dali,

Johnny Friedlaender Marc Chagall
Alexander Calder Joan Miro

Gecorges Rouault Victor Vasarely

and others.

SUNDAY, MARCH 25th at 3:00 P.M.
WEB ER'S INN - 3050 Jackson Rd.

I

EXHIBITION: 1:00-3:00

ADMISSION FREE

First Show of the Year Presented by Meridian Gallery

1 -r
WEDNESDAY
March 28, 1973
^ Atl:00 P.M.
losif Brodsky
POET-IN-RESIDENCE "
will be at ~
BORDERS BOOK SHOP Q
for an
Autograph Party &
Poetry Reading
The largest collection of his pa-
etry in translation will then be
BORDERS
316 S. STATE STREET
MICHAEL
SHOEMAKER
of the Bloomington, Indiano,
Rudrananda Yoga Ashram,
Will give lectures
and classes in
KUNDALINI YOGA
THIS WEEKEND
in ANN ARBOR

SUNDAY

10:30 a.m.-"Goals for the Second Century
World Mission"-Rev. Paul Hostetter

of

5:30-Student Supper
6:45-"Man in a Box: There's More Than One
Way to Skin a Pigeon"-
DR. ALAN RICE; BILL BENISH, senior in psych.

"Carnal Knowledge" I have experienced only three
or four movies that I was genuinely sorry to see end.
1 was sorry to see "Carnal Knowledge" end!"
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times

ONE WEEK FROM TONIGHT!

.1

"Carnal Knowledge" is one of the best movies
ever!"-Liz Smith, Cosmopolitan
Mike Nichols, Jack Nicholson, Candice Bergen, Ar-
thur Garfunkel, Ann-Margaret and Jules Feiffer
- TONIGHT-
Modern Languages Auditorium
7:00-8:00-8:45-9:45-10:30 p.m.

cc r n

-FRiFNnr, OF NFWSRFFI__

,])i .Z-D conc. -rr i c vvJ ur lvGYYJRCGL

.I

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