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March 22, 1973 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- Thumrsdav. anrch 22, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

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SPECIAL EVENINGS- SHE
Sunday and Monday: Quarter Nights
(BEER AND WINE)
Tuesday: All drinks'/z Price
Wednesday: Singles Night
free admission and all drinks
1/2 price for women
341 So. Main, Ann Arbor 769 5960

ABC-TV to sloiw
rock music festival

A N ICE

e
E WAY
T THE DAY
n pancakes
uit yogurt
or coffee ...
6c
ig but Sunday,

HOLLYWOOD (UPI)-The rock
concert phenomenon is steadily
increasing its impact on network
television, an ABC-TV announce-
ment made clear Tuesday.
In the announcement, the net-
work said it will present a three-
hour Rock Music Festival begin-
ning late in the night on Friday,
Apr. 27, and continuing into the
wee hours of the next day.
Stars will include Seals &
Crofts, Curtis Mayfield, Alice
Cooper, Bo Diddley, The Allman
Brothers Band, Poco, and Blood,
Sweat and Tears.
The broadcast will be twice as
long as the In Concert late night
rock shows that are presented
every other Friday. But it will
be part of that relatively new
series.
ABC-TV admits, however, that
the special "encompasses seg-
ments previously telecast" on its
In Concert series-in short, re-.
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
GILBERT AND SULLIVAN
SMALL COMPANY
presents
'Haste to the Wedding
A forcial opere.tta by
W. S. Gilbert & George Grossmith
Fri. & Sat., March 23 & 24
Michigan Room of the League
8:00 p.m.-$1.00

runs.
And, as with all the In Concert
outings, this broadcast will be
simulcast by a number of FM
stereo radio stations around the
country.
ABC-TV says the special is
"the first single continuous net-
work program of that length to
be devoted to contemporary mu-
sical sounds."
However, it is of viewer in-
terest, and competitive network
interest, that three consecutive
hours of rock and pop music
have been available for a while
through a combination of ABC-TV
and NBC-TV programming every
other Friday night and early
Saturday.
It might also be noted that
over at CBS-TV, there have been
plans to broadcast the blockbuster
rock festival movie Woodstock
this spring.
All of this may not exactly
all up to rock around the clock
at the video networks, but it
certainly is proof that the con-
servative broadcasting organiza-
tions have opened the doors much
wider to the newer music than
they used to, even if they really
don't feel too comfortable with
it.
High level network brass still
has a basically fox trot outlook.

By KEN ALTSHULER
and MIKE HARPER
The Beatles . . . the foursome
from Liverpool, England, who,
in the span of less than a decade,
redefined the word "music" and
wrote their ownchapter in en-
tertainment history. Beatlemania
in the sixties was screaming
teenagers, soldout Americancon-
certs, millions of dollars, and the
birth of a dream; a cohesive,
complete, ultra-talented, super-
human unit. Beatlemania today
is a fantasy destroyed at t h e
hands of the men who created it.
The Beatles disbanded.
The Beatles' past is written in
over twenty albums, scores of
singles, a musical company / re-
cording studio, fame, fortune, and
that mysterious touch of magic-
ianship. Their peak was Revol-
ver with "Eleanor Rigby" and
Sgt. Pepper's with "A Day in the
Life", but with Magical Mystery
Tour and their white album, their
splitting was obvious.
On the double album each Bea-
tle did his own work with limit-
ed support of each other; just
enough to be the Beatles in name,
but certainly not in perform-
ance. It must have been their in-
stinct of professionalism t h a t
made them create the incredi-
ble "Abbey Road" in the midst
of their break-up, but that w a s
their final group effort.
Separately, their four individual
histories are surprising and iron-
ic. The best soloist of the group,
without a doubt, is George Har-
rison. All Things Must Pass is
a great double album and would
have been a sensational single
disc. In guitarmanship he is next
to none, and his composing tal-
ent, which was suppressed under
Lennon/McCarthy, is now fully
developed.
Harrison's deep interest in Ind-

ian religion and music is refined
and sophisticated into such crea-
tions as "My Sweet Lord" and
"Isn't It a Pity" and the addi-
tion of songs like "Beware of
Darkness" makes All Things
Must Pass the best solo album
by a Beatle.
Ringo Starr has one good al-
bum, Beaucoups of Blues. It's
an easy-going, relaxing album;
nothing spectacular, but fine
country tunes. Ringo has matured
from a token drummer to a good
performer, and his departure
may have been a personal finan-
cial disappointment, but it has
initiated his creative develop-
ment.
John Lennon, the master of the
lyrical Beatles who penned "
Day in the Life" and "Eleanor
Rigby" has reduced himself to.
a socio-political fool, spouting
rhetoric in place of poetry.
Much of his lyrical power is
displayed on his first real solo
effort in "Working Class Hero"
and "I Found Out',' His words
are a stripping of the man's de-
lusions and fantasies. He makes
his pain real and felt, and main-
taines his artistic talent in the
process.
In "Isolation", Lennon criti-
cizes the public that ostracized
him for his relationship w i t h
Yoko Ono. He is right in his as-
sertion that an artist's w o r k
must be distinguished' from his

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private life, b
tice what he
cluding Yoko
his music bec
key and lyri
Lennon alone
and a decent
shows bad jug
topics, the wo
the musicians
port his effor
Paul McCa
is interesting
pletely alone
first solo alb
"Maybe I'm
have been tre
per productio
ly good on th
Wing are an
phistication h
the Beatles, a
to the trivial,
to enjoy. An
mistakingly it
cal spouse in
ney is the w
four, for he n
intelligent co
fesional prou
In 1968, the
ed Sgt. Pep
where to go
how could th
the greatest
ever will be
stereo, perfe
feet cooperati
ing, with a si
Lennon and 1

TO START
whole grai
fresh fru
hot cider, tea

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... et the &ea/e4
ut he fails to prat- returned to the studio to record
preaches; by in- "Hey Jude." Their lost spirit and
in his solo work, broken direction were restored
,omes painfully off- instantly; their unity was obvious
cally insignificant. in their choruses, and their com
is a good lyricist radship evident in their musician-
musician, but he ship.
dgment in his song With the memory of a broken
rk he produces, and group in spirit an direction being
he chooses to sup- restored with one song, one has
ts. to ponder the possibilities of a
rtney's first album reunited Beatles.
- he did it com-
and it was the In the past few weeks, rumors
um by a Beatle. around Los Angeles reported
Amazed" would John, George and Ringo in the
mendous under pro- studio and Paul attempting to re-
n, but it is mere- turn to the U.S. to reform the
is album. Ram and Beatles. As it turns out, part of
injustice to the so- the story is true: John and
e established with George are in the studio with ten
nd at best, a-credit other musicians backing up Ringo
pop world he seems on his new album. Paul is in
d he, like Lennon, England fighting two ndope
ncludes an unmusi- charges, but trying to enter the
his band. McCarty 'States for financial matters.
orst soloist of the Though the 1;eates are not to-
nakes no attempt at gether, two remarkable events
hmposng and pro- have occured. John, George and
dction. Ringo are together for the first
Beatles had record- time since the break-up, and Paul
pers and had no- and John are on speaking terms.
from there . . - All four have mentioned that it
hey? It is possibly would be nice to work together
album that has, or again . ..
recorded; perfect Could they be a cohesive, pro-
ct production, per- ductive unit once again? Could
on. But in one even- they re-create the incredible
ngle composition by magnetism displayed by thou-
----yth---sands lining concert halls and
motel walls to glimpse the "fab-
ulous foursome?" If McCartney
and Lennon can work and co-
operate with each other, the
Beatles can reform. Paul and
John were musical foils; Lennon
sawed off the edge of McCart-
ney's "popness" and . McCartney
removed much of Lennon's trite-
ness. If that musical compromise
can be restored, so can the
Beatles.
But Harrison would have to be
allowed to write equally. A com-
. , bination of the three would be
unbelieveable and unsurpassable,
but even alone, Harrison must be
recognized as the best musician
of the group, and certainly com-
patible at song writing. Starr
will suffice as a personality and
adaquate drummer, but his role
is a catalyst to preserve the
group as performers and friends.
On Lennon's "God," he says
he doesn't believe in Beatles;
"The dream is over." The Beatles
as a myth is not necessary any
longer. No one needs that magi-
' " cal belief any more, most of all
Lennon and company. They are
,.. a^ four individuals who, as a unit,
revolutionized the musical world,
and mesmerized a delusioned
to by JOHN UPTON generation. Now the need and
belief is for reality . . . if they
at Power Center. can adapt to that change, and to
modern audiences each other's, the dream is just
beginning.

every mornin

Nf7WVL )00)5 )SJWJfT
315 F.STATE SZ ANN 11ROP 161-7918

PRES ENTS
A KATHERINE HE PBURN WEEKEND
Beginning TONIGHT,
March 22
with
HOLIDAY
co-starring Cary Grant, Edward Ev-
erett Horton, Jean Dixon, Lew Ayres,r
Doris Nolan.
Directed by GEORGE CUKOR
A sophisticated comedy in which Johnny Case
(Grant) proposed to a rich man's daughter,
falls for her sister, and must decide whether
to marry into the family or succeed on his own.
ONE OF THE BEST FILMS OF 1938
FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
ALICE ADAMS STAGE DOOR LITTLE WOMEN
SHOWINGS AT
7 and 9:05 ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM $1.00

written by NEIL SIMON
directed by ELAINE MAY
"ONE OF THE
YEAR'S BEST"
-N.Y. TIMES
~-NEWSWEEK
-TIME
-NEW YORKER
2 ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINATIONS
Jeannie Berlin, best
supporting Actress.
Eddie Albert, best
supporting Actor.
NEXT STREISAND
IN "UP THE SANDBOX"

Daily Pho
Italian revival
Bruno Martinotti conducted the Angelicum Orchestra of Milan, Italy last night
Founded in 1941, the ensemble of 30 was the first Italian orchestra to present to
revivals of works long forgotten. See review in tomorrow's Daily.

I

OPEN
12:45
DAILY
SHOWS
AT
1 PM
3 PM
5 PM
7 PM
9 PM

aA '[

00-

1

Starts
Tomorrow!

PROGRAM INFORMATON 434-1782
WAA D

Starts
Tomorrow!

toeI

"THE FIRST IMPORTANT FILM OF 1973-
AND POSSIBLY OF THE SEVENTIES!"
-Arthur Knight. Saturday Review
"NEVER-NOT EVEN IN "A DEEPLY PROFOUND
'THE DAYS OF WINE AND SHATTERING
AND ROSES-HAS JACK EXPERIENCE! IT USES
LEMMON BEEN MORE ITS POWER TO IN-
,,..TOTALLY AND FELICI VOLVE, ENTERTAIN
TOUSLY PAIRED WITH AND EVEN GRIP THE
A ROLE. This is a superb AUDIENCE AS FEW
actor playin g tothe hilt a MOVIES IN RECENT
role that comes along MEMORY HAVE EVEN
fonce in a decade!l" . ATTEMPTED TO DO!
- Arthur Knight, Saiurday 'SAVE THE TIGER'
Reiew and Westways Mag. ESTABLISHES LEMMON
SPRAVAS ONE OF THE
"SUPERLATIVE SCREEN'S MOST
EMENT POWERFUL ACTORS!
JACK LEMMON -Rex Reed,
a triumphant Syndicated Columnist
celebration of 'is IT'S DYNAMITE!
twentieth year JACK LEMMON
in filmns!"
-Judth cast, WILL BE, AN OSCAR
NewYorkMag NOMINEE!"
-Rona Barrett,'
Metromedia TV _
PARAMOUNT PICTURES CORPORATION and FILMWAYS, INC. present
TAVT I ThAkAAfNT

I

I

tonight
6:00 2 4 7 News
9 Courtship of Eddie's Father
50 Flintstones
56 Opperation Second Chance
6:30 2 CBS NEWS
4 NBC News
7 ABC News
9 I Dream of Jeannie
50 Gilligan's Island
56 Classroom Meetings
7:00 2 Truth or Consequences
4 News

1I1

7 To Tell The Truth
9 Beverly Hillbillies
50 I Love Lucy
56 Course of Our Times
7:30 2 what's My Line?
4 Circus!
7 Michigan Outdoors
9 woods and Wheels
50 Hogan's Heroes
56 Behind the Lines
8:00 2 The Waltons
4 Flip wilson
7 Mod Squad
9 Billy Graham Crusade
56 Intertel Law and Order
50 Dragnet
8:30 50 Merv Griffin
9:00 2 Movie
"Hornet's Nest" (1970).
4 Ironside
7 Kung Fu
9 News
56 An American Family
9:30 9 Happy Though Married
10:00 4 Dean Martin
7 Streets of San Francisco
9 Adieu Alouette
50 Perry Mason
56 Masterpiece Theatre
10:30 9 Countrytime
11:00 2 4 7 News
9 CBC News
50 One Step Beyond
11:20 9 Newws
11:30 2 Movie-
"Joy House"
(French, 1964)
4 Johnny Carson
7 Dick Cavett

50 Movie
"silver Dollar" (1932)
11:40 9 Curling Report
12:00 9 Movie
"The Ride to Hangman's Tree"
(1966)
1:00 4 7 News
1:10 2 Movie
"The Golden Eye" (1948)
2:40 2 TV High School
3:10 2 News
wcbn
89.5 fm
9 The Morning After show
12 Progressive Rock
4 Folk
7:10 Future Worlds Lecture;
Donella and Dennis Meadows
8 Jazz
11 Progressive Rock
cable tv
channel 3
3:30 Pixanne
4:00 Today's Woman
4:30 Something Else (rock)
5:00 Stratosphere Playhouse
5:30 Local News/Town Crier
6:00 Love and the Law
6:30 NCAA Sports
7:00 Community Dialogue
8:00 School Board Meeting

SOON: PAUL NEWMAN
"THE LIFE & TIMES OF JUDGE ROY BEAN"

I ff

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- - -.1
---

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CUUWTRF C U.EARk
MUSIC-The Ark presents Cadillac Cowboys at 8:30; The
Bach Club performs The St. Matthew Passion in Green
Lounge, E. Quad at 8, wine and cheese served.
MUSIC SCHOOL-Piano student recital in the Recital Hall at
12:30 p.m.; John Calloway on bass in Recital Hall at 8.
FILM-Ann Arbor Film Co-op shows Bergman's Shaine in
Aud. A at 7 and 9; Cinema Guild screens Cukor's Bill of
Divorcement in Arch. Aud. at 7 and 9:05; S. Quad Films
..--f F KrAVIv-i inVining Rm 'Tuo t 7 and 9: New

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