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March 18, 1973 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-18

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4

,i

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 18, 1973

Glory
(Continued from Page 1)
all kinds of people. There were
train fanatics that would just sit
and watch the trains come in."
There was One--Eyed Charlie, a
local hobo who made the depot
his favorite haunt and who made
a general nuisance of himself,
Usually drunk, Charlie would loll
around the station asking for hand-
outs and accosting women.
And although he was regularly
evicted by the police, he would in-
variably return. Finally Aldrich
called the police station and de-
manded to know why Charlie had
not been locked up.
"One-Eyed Charlie can slip into
places we can't get into," she was
told. "Charlie gets every crime
lead we need in town."
So Charlie stayed and became a
fixture in the otherwise ever-
changing scene of commuters, stu-
dents and miscellaneous travelers.
Salesmen made the train their
home; students used it as a means
of escape: poor Southern whites
'-igrated in droves to work in
the bomber plant.
The Michigan Central Railroad-
a locally originated line-had built
the depot in 1887 for the extrava-
gant sum of $30,000. The depot
was designed as a 'showplace for
the railroad and its was regally
appointed with Turkish rugs, rock-
ing chairs, and what a then con-
temporary newspaper called "fancy
settees for the ladies."
The depot was eventually en-
larged, the appointments became
functional and the . settees disap-
peared as the railroad became
busier and more passengers passed
through the depot.
By the mid 1930's the Michigan
Central was reachinghpeak pro-
ductivity. The trains had names :

fadesd
the Wolverine, the Mercury, the
Twilight, the Detroiter-and there
were 42 every day.
"We really had a railroad. We
gave service, we had enough help
to give service and everything was
clea--there was never even a
weed in the yard."
Marion Starry talks, acts-is-
the definitive Railroad Man." Tall,
lean and erect despite his 73 years,
there is nothing grandfatherly
abo-t him.
His life has been spent on the
railroad-31 years as a baggage-
man at the depot after arriving
here in 1935 from another job at

but memories

agement that entered became more"
demanding as men were laid off
and the railroals deteriorated. Dur-
ing his final years at the depot,
Starry worked as janitor in addi-
tion to his baggageman job. "They
had me cleaning washrooms," he
says with disgust. "The longer you
worked there, the meaner they
got."
He speaks bitterly of the "big
men in New York" who sat at
their desk and gave orders while
the railroads became inefficient
and disorganized. "There were too
many chiefs and not enough In-
dians."

It is almost midnight and the
ticket seller is alone in the depot
when No. 9 from New York comes
to a grinding halt. Three men
wearing dark coats, their hats
pulled low over their eyes, get off
and demand to see the books. They
say they are auditors.
But the ticket seller thinks they
are gansters and calls the station
agent before showing them any-
thing.
The agent opens the books and
during the audit an illegal petty
cash box is discovered, an in-
investigation is over, the egent

According to Aldrich, the depot was the perfect set-
tin for melodrama, but she and o th e r s who worked
there view the station's finat years as tragedy-the re-
suit oiily of neglect and mismanagement,.

linger
in the early 1960's and the railroad
was bogged down in an even larger
bureacuracy, "there just wan't'
anyone around to take care of a
passenger's needs and wants,"
says Starry.
Maybe. Or maybe passenger
trains are simply obsolescent in
an age when it is cheaper and
considerably faster to take a
plane. Even Starry admits he
"never traveled much 03 the
train."
"You'll laugh," Viola Aldrich
says, "but I bought stock in Penn
Central even though it is a bank-
rupt company. The railroad must'
prevail."
But today the depot is a restau-
rant, purchased in 1968 for soine
ten times what the Michigan Cen-
tral paid to build it almost a h1 n-
dred years ago. The building 1,0s
not changed atlhough thera are
new 'fancy settees'; and the res-
taurant's name is rooted in rail-
road history.
Gandy dancers were workers
who followed a machine dumping
gravel along the tracks. Their job
was to spread it evenly: Supposed-
ly there was one gang, headed by~
a man named Gandy, that worked
particularly fast-so fast that they
seemed to dance down the track-.
The depot has been historicaly
preserved-but it is a restaurant.
Of course, there is still a depot.
Located a few yards from the
Gandy Dancer is a small building
labelled AMTRAK. It was once
used for storage by another rail-
road. Four passenger trains ruin-
ble to a halt here each day, un-'
heralded by marching bands and
without a single cheerleader boui-.
ing on the roof.

(Continued from Page 5)
PERSONAL
ON SUNDAY, Mar. 18. 8:00 p.m., the
Ann Arbor Cantata Singers and
Chamber Orchestra will present G..F.
Handel's oratorio, "I SRHA EL IN
EGYPT" at University Reformed
Church, E.aHuron at Fletcher. Ad-
mission: adults, $1.50; students and
children, $0.75. Tickets at The Musicl
Shop, 717 No. University, and at the
door. 60F131:

PERSONAL
WANT TO MAKE a deal? For large
wine orders try us. The Village
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NAME YOUR TOURNAMENT
8-Bail, 9-Ball, Straight Pool?
Sign Up - Union Billiards
cF13O
PASSPORT APPLICATION PICS. faster,
and cheaper, by experienced Daily
photographer. Come to the Daily on
Mondav nightsbetween 7 and 8:a sk

DO YOU dislike money? Do you lik for David Margolick. dFl3
reading this page? Would you like toP FESSIONALLY desinediamond
write it? If the answer to any or all engagement and wedding rings. Hand
of these questions is YES, then come hammered, hand engraved, any pat-
on down to 420 Maynard St., or call tern-wholesale. Austin Diamond,
764-0560 and join the MICHIGAN 1209 S. University. 663-7151. cFtc
DAILY CLASSIFIED STAFF. dFl3l _______
ARE YOU PREGNANT Desperate?
BILLIARDS and BOWLING Dayyor Night, Call Problem - Preg-
OPEN TODAY AT 1 P.M. nancy Help. 7(69-7283. cFtc
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WIN $50 WORTH OF FOOD in the great Prof. Curtis. 662-8281. 70F130
Garbage Pit Calendar Coloring Con-_
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ENJOY COMPANY while eating? Board WE DO GOOD PIZZAS-the president.
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761-7435. 07E131 ___--- - -

PERSONAL
BOARD EXAM TUTORING
Enrollment for Kaplan Tutoring
courses. nov being accepted for the
upcoming LSAT, MC AT, DAT exams,
For infe-mation and enrollment call
313-354-0085, cFtc
at MARTY'S
"Wail-of -Slax"
Flared 'n Cuffed
Knit or Knot
Jeans 'n Jackets
MARTY'S MEN FASHION. CLOTHING
310 S. State St.
cFtc
DON'T PAY for a store's overhead via
high mark-up. For the areas lowest
prices and finest qualities possible on
an engagement ring, shop Austin Dia-
mond, 1209 S. University, 663-7151.
cFtc
UNIQUE JEWELRY DESIGNS. Award-
winning artist-craftsman. Bands,
stone setting, e tc. Fairly priced. Stu-
dio 484-0854 or 434-0055.
5 J's JEWELRY cFtc
OZONE HOUSE is begining, an emer-
gency shelter program. If you oc-
casionally can give someone a bed for
a couple of days, call 769-6544.
04F131
GRAD COFFEE HOUR: Wed. night, 8-
10 p m. Lots of people. Special: Hot
Chocolate, 4th floor Rackham. New
people welcome! * cFtc

s1

-1 spoolwa 11111 11 1 pill oplip Ig milmillim
AM
S4D g tthejqkdo e
grel the job done
ad

another railroad in Cedar Rapids,
Iowa (he calls it 'Ioway').
Now he sits in his living room
with a moose wading in the tapes-
try behind him and remembers
a {different depot from the one
Aldrich recalls.
His job was baggage, getting
baggage on the trains, and even
the people he remembers are bag-
gage-corpses in caskets, patients
on stretchers.
Starry doesn't romanticize. The
railroad he came to in the 1930's
was not the same one he left
eight years ago "when he didn't
care if he worked any more."
The local Michigan Central was
acquired bythe larger New York
Central in 1944 and the new man-

"When the New York Central' vestigation is called. Before the

took over the line (from the Michi-
gan Central in 1944) the railroad
started going downhill. And when
the Pennsylvania came in, it went
to nothing."
Starry began working at the de-
pot hauling mail to the city post
office, but he "had a lot of leisure
time," the baggage men were busy
and he helped out rather than
watch. And when the rush was
over, the .station agent handed
him a check.
Starting pay was $3.97 for an
eight hour day of hand labelling
baggage and loading suitcases and
trunks and 200 sacks of mail on
the train. There was no6overtime
pay and the job was 365 days a
year long.
Remembering his years on the
railroad now, he speaks warmly
only of the early years when stu-
dents would :crowd the platforms
at the beginning or end of each
term-"when everyone dressed
with the boys wearing suits and
the girls wearing dresses."
Celebrities would invariably ar-
rive by train then and word would
go down the line that "so and so
is on No. 12. And we had big
doings for Wendell Wilkie-even
built a big platform . .."
But celebrities obviously don't
interest Starry. He is a railroad
man and he did his job and that
is what he talks about. One-ton
loading carts, sacks of mail and
the men who were killed. The
crash in 1940 when 20 cars were
derailed and the locomotive turned
over on its side and lay there like
a wounded animal.
"I don't know what Marion
Starry could tell you," Aldrich
says. "He was only a baggage
man."
Because she remembers the de-
pot differently-in anecdotes that
are sometimes like a late night
movie:
FOOSBA LL
BOWLING
TABLE TENNIS
BILLIARDS
UNION

has committeed suicide.
According to Aldrich, the depot
was the perfect settting for melo-
drama but she and the others who
worked there view the statian's
final years as tragedy-the re-
sult only' of neglect and misman-
agement.
Passenger service was never as
profitable as freight traffic and
the railroad gradually cut one
train after another, laying off men
and discontinuing services Ike
dining cars and express runs that
attracted passengers.
By the time Penn Central had
merged with New York Cenral

RESUMES
$20.00
Includes consultation, writing, and
printing 50 copies, 1 page. Achieve
positive results. Mail orders invited.
BEST RESUME SERVICE
17220 W. 8 Mile Rd.
Southfield, Michigan 48075
1-356-2332
02F134
TRAVELLING IN Europe or interested
in having your son or daughterwpar-
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participants at BIRUS last summer.
Languages, ice-skating, skiing, etc.
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Do You REALLY Want To Go To
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CO-OP DINNERS 1' nights/week $6.00. 1
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__ . .

WANT TO
* ,Impress your
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friends?
cokes ?

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

* Meet some new peosle ?
* Learn something about advertising?
® And even get paid eventually?
Cash in on this once in a lifetime offer
Call Ray at 764-0560, or drop in at
420 Maynard

Camp Metamora, Det. Metro. Girl
Scout Council. Will interview Mar. 21,
9 to 5. Openings include camp,'direc-
tor (25 or over), general counselors,
specialists in waterfront, arts/crafts,
tripping, campcraft, drama, nature.
Attention Detroit Resident Stu-
dents: City of Detroit offers free
training for lifeguards for their city-
operated pools. Eight Week Program
beginning Mar. 26. Orientation meet-
ing Mar. 24; details at this office.
INTERVIEW: Oak Cove Resort,iLaw-
rence, Mi. Will interview Mar. 21, 9:30
to 5. Waitresses needed; room and
board plus tips and salary.
CAREER PLANNING & PLACEMENT
3200 SAB
INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS: Dept. of
the Army (WAC), Mar. 19; Inst. for
Paralegal Training, Fruehauf Inc., Aet-
na Life Ins., Mar. 20; O'Neils, Adult
Probation Dept. Montgomery County,
Mar. 21; The Hartford Ins.,, Mar. 22;
v BORDERS BOOK SHOP
NOW HAS AN EGCLUSIVE
STOCK OF
Jossey-Bass Publ.
IN
Behavioral Sciences
O AND0
Education
COME ON IN AND BROWSE
316 S. State-668-1653
OPEN MON.-SAT. 'TIL 10 P.M.

Liggett & Myers, Mar. 23; Wayne State
Univ., Mar. 27; Rike's, Rydell & Assoc.,
Mar. 28; Mass. Mutual Life Ins., Mar.
29; The May Co., Mar. 30; Montgomery
Ward, Apr. 4, 1973.
JOB HUNTING WORKSHOPS for
graduating students: If you're seeking
career employment in a non-teaching
area after graduation, sign up for a
one-hour- Job-Hunting Workshop. In-
cludes resume preparation, interview
techniques, job search ideas. Call 764-
7460 to sign up.

,.t
. r
,
,- -
'' '' G .t{ - 1
1,

THINK
BICYCLES!I

WANTED: ARTIST
To be responsible for the design, lay-out and distri-
bution of a weekly loint film schedule. Salary and
free pass to all independent film societies.
Contact: 769-7353
Coalition of Independent Campus Film Societies

Dankwart Rustow
(Notional chairperson of the Caucus for a New
Political Science)
will be visiting the U. of M. on
WEDNESDAY, March 21 for a
speaking engagement:
The Study of Politics, Old and New:
Professionalism vs. Social Obligation
-All are invited to attend-
7:30 P.M.-LECTURE RM. NO. 1 MLB
(Sponsored by the Grad & Undergrad Poli Sci Associations)

Sam Sturgis Collection
A crowd of dapper gentlemen greet the arrival of one of the
many trains that pulled into the city's depot in the 1920's.
CORNED BEEF SANDWICH ... $1.00
PASTRAMI SANDWICH .....$1.00
2 FRANKS . . . . . . ... $0.75
Above prices all include:
Hawai'an punch, coleslaw,
potato chips, and sauerkraut.
EVERY SUNDAY-6:00 p.m.
f at HILLEL-1429 Hill St.
Subscribe to The Daily
Phone 764-0558
ti
] f
zz

LONDON
THEATRE WORKSHOP
SUMMER 1973
July 16-August 31
sponsored by
U of M Extension Service
andk
U of M-Flint Theatre Department
Four hours of graduate or undergraduate credit for Speech 533:
Special Work in Theatre Production and Performance (2) and
Speech 539: Production and Direction of Contemporary Drama
(2).
International faculty. Tours, lectures, workshops, classes films,
street fairs, open rehearsals.
Approximate cost, including tuition, round-trip air fare, housing
arrd meals at Imperial College, University of London, and theatre
admissions-$1,000.
Application deadline: April 1. Registration limited.
For information, contact Dr. Gene J. Parola, Theatre Department,
U of M-Flint: (313) 767-4000, Ext. 234.
Center for Russian &
East European Studies
FALL OFFERING
- .n' rC ,r rA.C.T UC CAVIC r .* IkIIA':Ii

Spring is Fun Time: Kites-Frisbees-
Marbles - Roller Skates - Jacks -
Yo-Yo's - Time for riding a beautiful
10-Speed Bike! Schwinn - Raleigh -
Mercier - Lapierre - Motobecane
AND SOON to come "the famous
French Peugeot Bicycle." We have all
of your Bicycle Needs!
We service what we sell.
"THE FRIENDLY STUDENTS STORE"
Campus Bie and Toy
514 E. WILLIAM ST.
Compare the Records
Nice-sounding leaflets are a dime-a-dozen
in political campaigns. So we just ask you
to check the record - was if the Human
Rights Party or the Democrats who .. .
0 pushed for a City commitment to rent-con-
trot NOW.
" called for and held public on police priorities
and practices.
f sponsored unit - pricing, products dating,
nutritional labelling, and ban on non-return-
able bottle laws
S demand city aid for a low-cost abortion
cinic
* pushed for and got the first City funding for
chid-care centers
FRANK SHOICHET
City Council HRP-Ward 2

sI

I

The Dept. of Near Eastern Languages & Lit.
ANNOUNCES
THE 1972-73
ZWERDLING LECTURES
BY'
Nahum N. Glatzer
Samuel Lane Prof. of Jewish History & Social Ethics,
Dept. of Near Eastern & Judaic Studies, Brandeis
University
FIRST UNIVERSITY LECTURE:
The Book of Job & the Problem of
Man's Position in the Universe
WED., MAR. 21, 170 Physics-Astronomy, 4:10 p.m.
SECOND UNIVERSITY LECTURE:
The Prophet Jeremiah & the Religion
of the Spirit
THURS., MAR. 22, 170 Physics-Astronomy, 4:10 p.m.

" Left
service
Political

the Democrats after
on their Michigan
Reform Commission,

0 Urban Corps intern with
Detroit Model Cities.
* Community Organizing Di-
rector for local Vietnam Mor-
otorium.

* Coordinator f o r student
support of GM and U workers'
strikes.
" Organizer for M a y d a y
demonstrations in Washing-
ton, D.C.
" Active in HRP since Sep-
tember, 1971.
0 U-M law student.

El

1I

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