100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 17, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DA1LY

Saturday, March 1.7, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, March 17, 1973

HRPgles or political life'
(continued from Page 1) five female council candidates, worried that the apathy demon- HRP's performance in this elec-
appeal 'to the middle, many Demo- most of them young and almost all strated by University students re- tion will be the deciding factor in
crats are now trying to face left to of them talking the same sort of cently will be reflected in the poll- the party's ability to remain cred-
capture HRP's votes, politics as HRP itself. ing booths. ible. But estimates vary on just
This has resulted in the Demo- If this should be the case, HRP what performance would be ade-
cratic party fielding no less thanI Further, HRP strategists arecould stand to lose votes it must quate
--- - - - ---- - - __-oldstn-t ls-vte-t-us uae
hold to have any chance at all. Nancy Weschler, a member of
But despite the gloomy picture, Debs and an HRP City Council
Uswmreveralmembers of HRP rem member from the second ward,
ev c soptimistic. says she does not expect Kaimowitz

Impress your friends?
* Drink nickel cokes ?
Meet some new peo le?
s Learn something about advertising ?
* And even get paid eventually?
Cash in on this once in a lifetime offer
Call Ray at 764-0560, or drop in at
420 Maynard

dormitory residents

Come together in Ann Arbor
Karnatic Indian music drifts through Burns Park School last
night as Shubhangi Deshpande (left) and Madhav Deshpande
perform in Ann Arbor's world's fair. The event will continue
through tomorrow featuring cultures from around the world.
Senate members to
see Watergate file

(Continued from Page 1)
the Watergate incident and other
matters related to the 1972 Presi-
dential campaign."
"This agreement will prevent
improper dissemination of raw
FBI data and at the same time
meet the committee's needs," they
said.
Neither Ervin nor Baker could
be reached for elaboration but
aides said the chief counsel and
the minority counsel of the staff of
the special committee, as well as
the two senators, will have .access
to the raw files of the FBI's inves-

tigation to the bugging of Demo-
cratic headquarters.
L. Patrick Gray III, at Senate
Judiciary Committee hearings on
his nomination to be FBI director,
had offered to let any member of
the Senate examine the FBI files
of the Watergate investigation.
Gray, acting director of the FBI
since last May 3, said he was
proud of its investigation and
made his unprecedented offer so
that senators could see for them-
selves that, as he put it, the FBI
had made an all-out, no-holds-
barred investigation.

(Continued from Page 1) j
Feldkamp now says "it isn't re-
porting the robberies that we need,
it's preventing them. We know
what the problem is - selling
drugs."
The three evictions this week'
are not the first to occur recent-
ly.
Last year, two students were
evicted - one for pulling a false
fire alarm in Markley and another
student for co-habitation in Alice
Lloyd, according to Feldkamp.
Thestudent who pulled the false
fire alarm, a felony in Michigan,
was permitted to re-apply to a
different dorm.
Last term, two students were
evicted, one for the persistent use
of marijuana in Markley and the1
second, again for co-habitation,
from Oxford, Feldkamp said.
frBoth were reportedly given re-f
peated warnings.
In the Markley eviction, both the
student's resident adviser, Jeff
Peters, and building director, Le-
Peking baths
soothe clients
(Continued from Page 1)
and pounding flesh and cracking
joints in the "Rei King" bathhouse
for the past 40 years, from the old
Nationalist era through the Jap-
anese occupation of Peking to the
coming of the communists.
Medical students from the near-
by capital (formerly anti-imperial-
ist) hospital come to learn his
massage techniques, as he is one
of only 10 qualified masseurs in
Peking.
Chiang is also something of a
doctor himself, and he told one of
the girls she did not eat enough
and that her digestion was not
good.
Fortunately, Chiang's recipe for
good health is one certain to please
most Chinese and non-Chinese
alike.
"You may smoke and drink Mao-
tai (a fiery, sorghum-based liqueur)
-but in moderation," he said.
'Everything in moderation."

roy Williams, say they had talked
with him repeatedly on an individ-
ual basis, issued a letter of warn-
ing, and offered him a number of
alternative roommates before re-
sorting to eviction.
The student was finally evicted
for "possession of illegal drugs or
marijuana" - the same charge
that has caused Hoitt and the
others to be evicted.
. . .X J
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

SATURDAY, MARCH 17
DAY CALENDAR
Nationality Clubs World's Fair '73:I
Burns Park Elementary School, noon-
midnight.
Music School: L. Michaels, violin, SM
Recital Hall, 2:30 pm.
Music School: M. Bailey, tenor, SM
Recital Hall, 4:30 pm.
German Dept.: Buchner's "Leonce
& Lena," RC Aud., 8 pm.
Music School: Contemporary Direc-
tions, S. Hodkinson, conductor, Rack-
ham Aud., 8 pm.
Music School: C. Faba, piano, SM
Recital Hall, 8 pm.
U Players: Shakespeare's "King
Lear," Power, 8 pm.
Musical Society: Mozarteum Orches-.
tra of Salzburg, Hill, 8:30 pm.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
212 SAB
INTERVIEWS: Register by phone or
in person, 763-4117: Camp Tamarack,
Fresh Air Society. iW1 interview Mar.
22, 9:30 to 5; gen. counselors (in), bus!
truck driver, kitchen help, specialists
in modern dance, jeweler (silver, cop-
per. brass) ceramatist.
Camp Metamora, Det. Metro. Girl
Scout Council. Will interview Mar. 21,
9 to 5. Camp dir. (25 or over), gen.
counselors, specialists in waterfront,
arts/crafts, tripping, "campcraft, drama,
nature.
Oak Cove Desort, Lawrence, Mi. Will
interview Mar. 21, 9:30 to 5. waitresses
needed. room and board plus tips and
salary.
Attention Detroit Resirent Students:
City offers free training for lifeguards
for the thirty city-operated pools.
Eight week program beginning Mar. 26.
Orientation meeting Mar. 24; further
details avail, at this office.

MUSIC LESSONS
SIGN UP NO WFOR CLASS GUITAR LESSONS.
JUST $12.00 FOR A SIX-WEEK COURSE. Rentals
available.
Also private lessons on guitar, flute, recorder, banjo,
piano, and moog. CALL
Ann Arbor Music Mart
769-4980 9:30-9:00
336 South State Street
Join The Daily Ad Staff
Phone 764-0558

Schoichet, a law student at the
University, is generally considered
a strong possibility for victor in a'
ward, race with Democrat Carol
Jones, a University junior.
Kaimowitz, a 37-year-old com-
munity organizer, thinks her
chances for victory are good-even
though almost nobody else does.
It is generally conceded that
HRP candidates in other city wards
have little chance of victory -
though they may take votes from
the Democrats and make things
easier on the GOP.

to win ini the mayoral race but
adds: "I hope she takes enough
votes from Mogdis to elect Stephen-
son."
While this attitude is acceptable
to Weschler and other members of
Debs, it is viewed with alarm by
other party members.
Kaimowitz, realizing her poten-
tial to elect Stephenson, has taken
the offensive. She feels that Mog-
dis, not she, should bow out of the
race to avoid splitting the liberal
vote.
Mogdis, of course, insists he is in
it to the end.

Day care funding cut

(Continued from Page 1)
each recipient's case will have to!
be judged individually before day
care funding is provided; and
-elimination of funding for all
families except those whose par-
ents are working or training to
work.
The guideline changes are an at-
tempt to "knock out the under-
pinnings of group day care in the
United States," comments Gabe
Kaimowitz, legal advisor to local
Regents OK
new code
(Continued from Page 1)
the Cellar's request for five more
years of subsidization by rolling
assessment on a motion from Re-
gent Robert Nederlander (R-De-
troit). Nederlander said he read
the Cellar's financial statement to
show that in three years the store
would have accumulated the init-
ial capital necessary to finance its
operations.
Cellar representatives B r u c e
Wilson and Dennis Webster told
the Regents at Thursday's meet-
ing that according to their pro-
jections, the store needs to collect
the five dollar refundable fee
from incoming students for five
more years before it can capitalizeI
itself independently. d (
Regent Lawrence Lindemer (R-
Lansing) amended Nederlander's
motion to a two-year extension to
force an "improvement in business'
practices" he claimed is neces-
sary.'
After two years the Cellar will
have to return to the Regents and
request a one-year extension.
Nederlander stressed that stu-
dents should not expect the Cellar
subsidization to be extended past'
the three-year deadline.
On a third issue Nellie Varner,
University affirmative action di-
rector, spoke in favor of racial
identification on job applications,
a proposal alsoesupported by the
Executive officers but voted down
by Assembly 21-18.j
Fleming said the proposal would
clear up statistical problems the
University is experiencing in try-
ing to reach the standards re-
quired by the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare
(HEW).
The final issue - which the Re-'
gents voted down without discus-
sion - was the SGC proposal for
two SGC seats on the Board of
Regents. Only Regent Gerald
Dunn (R-Livonia) voted in favor
of the requested SGC positions
which would be analogous to those
of the Executive Officers.

child care groups.
"Low income working class peo-
ple," he adds, "are going to be
driven back onto the welfare rolls
because they can't afford child-
care payments."
State-widethe $3850 a year in-
come ceiling is expected to elimi-
nate day care funding for approx-
imately 1,000 families.
Since there are more day care
centers proportionally to the num-
ber -of people in the Ann Arbor
area than in most other parts of
the state, Kaimowitz estimates
that "in excess of a hundred" chil-
dren will be affected by this pro-
vision locally.
The ban on matching funds from
private sources is expected to end
federal funding for a number of
local centers which receive money
from the United Fund and the In-
terfaith Council of Churches.
According to Pat Horn, coor-
dinator for the Committee of Co-
ordinated Child Care (CCCC),
those affected include the Perry
School and Jack and Jill centers,
the Ann Arbor Child Care and De-
velopment Center, the Bethel AME
center, and the Second Baptist
Center.
Elimination of groun eligibility
may prove the end of the state-
wide program for migrant farmers,
says Ruth Hurvitz, CCCC adminis-
trative assistant. Although the pro
gram provides day care for 2,500
migrant children, the cost of in
vestigating individual cases will ba
more than the program's original
budget, she says.
The restriction of funding fon
those who work, means an end tc
day care for "eighty to one hun
dred"children locally who ar<
now in centers for "social and
health" reasons, Horn estimates.
Meanwhile, City Council's atten
tion wasdrawn to the guidelin
changes at its meeting last Mon-
day night. Mayor Robert Harris
said he would call a special coun
cil session later in the week tc
deal with the matter.
Harris says he sent a letter, "or
behalf of council," to HEW offi
cials in Washington protesting the
decision.
COMING
KEN KESEY'S
P LDN1E flRJH FDD
Tues. &Thurs, 7:30 & 930 p.m.
Modern Languages Bldg., Aud. 3
NEW WORLD FILM CO-OP

;
Ft
j'
t'
0'
o
1E
r
,
e,,
d
-
e
-
s'
r-
o
n
i-
e
i

YOUR WORLD! WELCOm TO IT!

March 16-18
Fri.: 7-12 p.m.
Sat.: 12-12
Sufl.: 12-6 p.m.

Burns Park
School
1414 Wells
Ann Arbor

U of M FOREIGN STUDENTS
PRESENT
WORLD'S FAIR '73
International VreyShow
EXHIBITS OF INTERNATIONAL ARTS & CRAFTS
DELICIOUS, EXOTIC MEALS AND SNACKS
ADMISSION TO FAIR: Adults $1.00
Children: .50
VARIETY SHOW: $.50
GROUP RATES (25 or more)
CALL 764-9310 for information

HILLEL & MIDRASH-COLLEGE OF JEWISH STUDIES OF DETROIT
PRESENT
DR. ELLIS RIVKIN
Professor of Jewish History, Hebrew Union CollegeJ. ' r..
SPEAKING ON
"The Contemporary Crisis and the Jewish Historical
Experience: Options for American Jews
8 p.m., Monday, March 19, at HILLEL, 1429 Hill
Now Has Some Beautiful New Titles at Some Amazing Prices
NATURAL FOODS COOKBOOK By Anna Lee: A Handy Kitchen Guide Filled with Meatless
Recipes & Suggestions for Delicious Meatless Meals. Including 16 Full Color Photographs,
Plus Drawings. An Asset to Any Kitchen. ONLY 2.98
{ CASSEROLE COOKBOOK By Elizabeth Sewell: Including More Than 100 Tempting Casse-
role Recipes-for Entire Families, for Light Lunches or Suppers, for Limited Budgets, and for
Meals in a Hurry. Full Color Photos. A Must AT ONLY 2.49
PARTY COOKING: An Exciting Edition Devoted Solely to the Art of MARGUERITE PATTERN'S ,INTERNATIONAL COOK E RY IN
Giving Parties on Special Occasions. Everything from a Children's COLOUR: Over 340 Color Photos of a World of Exciting Recipes,
Birthday Party to a Wine & Cheese Party. 2.98 from France's Coquavin to China's Sweet & Sour Veal and Toffe.e
Apples. A Beautiful Edition to Liven Any Kitchen. SALE 5.98
THE HISTORY OF CHAMPAGNE By Andre L. Simon: Tracing the
Fortunes'- of This Noble Wine Through Several Centuries and the
S Champagne Industry from Its Origins to the Present. A Beautiful
Edition. 4.98
S THE RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KHAYYAM OF NAISHAPUR: A
Charming Little Edition Illustrated by Charles Stewart-A Must for BOB DYLAN: AN INTIMATE BIOGRAPHY.
~ Any Poetry Library. ONLY 1 .00 By Anthony Scaduto. The First Complete J
Biography of America's Most Popular, Most
Controversial, Most Elusive Culture Head-
BOOK OF ORIENTAL CARPETS AND RUGS: The Original Carpet tReveals the Private Bob Dylan that the Pub- °
Book for Beginners. A Brief History, Explanation of Techniques, lic Never Sees Including 11 Photographs.
j Lavishly Illustrated with 60 Full Color Plates. An Exceptional Offer Published at 7.95, Now an Incredible 198
at ONLY 4.98
CARPETS OF THE ORIENT: 80 Full Color Photos and Over 150
Drawings of the Most Exquisite Carpets from Various Areas of the THE TREASURY OF BIRDS: Fascinating and Superbly Illustrated
East. Was 12.50, NOW ONLY 5.95 Survey of the Wide Range of Both Familiar and Little Known
Species, Those Near Extinction-Chapters on Migration, Habits, Sea
A DICTIONARY OF SYMBOLS: An Invaluable Reference Source Birds, etc. Over 50 Photos. SPECIAL PRICE 2.98 '
c for the Student of Psychology, the Artist and the Poet-A Philoso-
I r pher's Dream in the Study of the Symbolism, that Human Begins THE NATIONAL PARKS OF AMERICA: Centennial Edition Includ-
Have Always Used to Communicate. From 12.00 to 3.98 ing 1 85 Photographs, 90 in Beautiful Color, Separate Chapters Docu-
menting the Wildlife and Wilderness Heritage in Our 36 National
HOW TO RECOGNIZE FLOWERING WILD PLANTS: The Gardener, Parks. A Magnificent Publication at 17.95. Now on Sale at on
0 Hiker, Outdoorsman, Student Guide-A Highly Accurate, Easy-to-
Use Guide to Over 900 Species of Wildflowers from Canada to the Unbelievable 7.98
Gulf Regions. Over 700 Illustrations. Pub. at 7.95, NOW 2.98
WOMAN'S OWN BOOK OF HOUSE PLANTS: Lavishly Illus., Highly
Informative Guide to Growing House-Plants Selection & Display,
Plant Hygiene, Bottle Gardens, Questions & Answers on Plant Prob-
ems. Almost 200 Photos, 49 in Full Color-A SPECIAL VALUE
ECRETS OF ORIGAMI: The Japanese Art AT 3.98
car f PperFolding-Deluxe Volume Present-
ing the Wide Range of International Ex- THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO GARDEN FLOWERS: Over 1,000 Full
pertise in This Fascinating Pastime-A De- Color Photos & Detailed Authoritative Text on Hundreds of Varieties
lightful Manual of Entertainment and In- of Flowers, Plants & Shrubs of North America. A must for any
struction with 138 Models & 1400 Line
Drawings & Photos to Illustrate the Tech- gardener. ONLY 598
nique. An Unusual & Special Value at 3.98
WORLD CERAMICS: An Illustrated History Edited by Robt. J.
Charleston. The History of Ceramics, thru Pre-History, the Medieval
p) & Renaissance Periods, the Age of Elegance, Up to the Present Day.
EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS By An- Ove.r 1,000 Illustrations, 65 in Full Color-Complete and Authori-
. thony Baines: "Pictorial Museum" of Over 800 Photos Along with tative Text by a Team of 20 Experts. A Magnificent Edition-
a Brilliant Text---A Complete History of Non-Keyboard Instruments
of the Western World, Featuring Classic Models from 1450 to 1900, 25.00 to 9.98
Various Unusual and Unique Specimens. Published at 30.00
C NOW 9.98 WORLD ARCHITECTURE: An Illustrated History Ed. by T. Copple-
stone. The History of Architecture from a Neolithic Settlement to the
414 PIACCeh' r .r U C kaAA rC Ir A {t,kRb . . IA...... fl,..a....... ........ r . A

"'u "2
R
e n
hf-6' /
ii * ,

SAMS

CONTEMPORARY.
DIRECTIONS 73
New Chamber Music by
BERJO-BOLCOM-ALBRIGHT

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan