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March 17, 1973 - Image 7

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-17

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Saturday, March 17, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

page even

SaturdQy, March 17, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY page ~,even

oft

SeeI3 9 ..Sten
Michigan basketball .. .
... More Baaaad bounces
Dan Borus -
" VWHO ARE THEY," Fielding Yost once asked, "that they
should beat a Michigan team." In Big Ten basketball this
past campaign they turned out to be just about the entire con-
ference.
While no basketball fan who rationally considered the matter
thought that the Wolverines were going to march through the
basketball tough Big Ten gauntlet like Sherman marched through
the South, basketball expectations around here were definitely
sunnyside up. But the 6-8 conference log the Wolverines brought
home were not the sort of waves everyone expected the squad
to make.
The collapse of the highly touted Maize and Blue was a
painful and mystifying spectacle to witness. At times the Ann
Arbor sixth graders who played at every home game half-time
looked more enthusiastic about playing. Passes gone astray,
foolish turnovers, poor play selection, and the lack of team de-
fense in the second half of the season marked the Wolverine
demise.
Surfacely it was the inabjilty to play as a coordinated
unit that marred the season that was supposed to bring
basketball back to Ann Arbor.
But that key cause, that one answer that will explain the
entire season, that cause is something Ann Arbor cage fans are
still puzzling out.
Everyone has his own pet theory. The explanations are
varied and range from the complex to the simplistic. Basically
they revolve around three focal points: the players, the outside
pressures of public and press and the coaching.
While the answer might never be fully ascertained, now,
before the season is mercifully put to rest, is an appropriate
time to explore the theories.
As stated by some, the "player" theory has three basic
tenets-the players were vastly over-rated in the initial
preseason advances, they lacked that will to win and they
were too disorganized to play winning basketball.
It is certainly correct that the Wolverines lacked a floor
leader a la Danny Fife. Joe Johnson and Wayman Britt, al-
though showing flashes of brilliance, lacked the experience to
direct the high power offense. The shots that a quarterback on
a basketball team sets up did not develop for the Michigan
offense.
However, blame for the demise should not be heaped upon
the shoulders of the two backcourtmen. The defense, too, lacked
a certain sort of cohesiveness. The zone defense which was
once the talk of the Big Ten had by the middle and end of the
season deteriorated to five men running around with their
hands up and the second half statistics bear this out.
In the last 11 games, in which the Wolverines could
manage but a 3-8 mark, they allowed the opposition a 83.5
points per game, as compared with a 72.3 average in their
first 13 contests.
It is hard to believe however that individually the talents
on the Michigan basketball squad were tremendously overrated.
Though the talents may have been exaggerated a bit, based on
past performance all in all they were not bad.
While Campy Russell is not the greatest individual to lace
up a pair of Converse lowtops, as he was once touted to be, he
has proven to be a relatively good forward and promises to be
an even better one.
Orr himself thought the team would do well, "Michigan will
be flying, both literally and figuratively" he wrote in pre-season
predictions. "With Campy," he crowed, "the defenses can't
concentrate on Henry,"' he stated. And though the rest of team
was not mentioned in overly glowing terms, it is fair to say that
Orr thought his team would do extremely well.
It is fair to say that on paper the team looked like one
of the teams to' beat for the crown. But as everyone knows
paper does not a champion make.
Hard to accurately evaluate is the players' will to win. True
they played with a good deal of lackluster, and failed to hussle
at key times, but one can not be sure whether the players were
numbed by insecurity or apathy. If it is the former then the
team needed stronger guidance. If it was the latter, then Mich-
igan was doomed to finish in the lower half of the conference
from the start.
At the Basketball Bust Monday (an awkwardly but sadly
appropriate name for the affair) the players looked just a little
shamed, like they had expected or wanted more.
At odd times, even the most adverse, their play was gutsy.
Wilmore, who frankly hurt the squad at times when he tried
to do it all, did just that-try to do it all. He did not stop trying.
And Ernie Johnson never really gave up.
Weighed as evidence must be the team's performance at
Illinois. Though the crowd was hostile, its Big Ten chances
all but gone, and the Illini about to break the game open,
the Maize and Blue came back. They shot 70 per cent from
the floor in the second half and closed the gap to one before
finally succumbing. Maybe they tried too hard.
Even harder to evaluate is the effect the pressure the fans

and press exerted on the Wolverines. To believe that fans are
not front runners, to feel that the press will praise a team
with public relations copy, or to feel that the pressure will not
exert itself are rather naive notions and any player who comes
to basketball with them is sadly mistaken. A coach who does not
persuade players of these facts has misled them.
True, Michigan fans expected a great deal too much and
were tremendous booers. Joe Johnson was quite correct when
he stated that Michigan does not have a home court advantage.
But pressure is part of this game as it is part of America.
It is American as apple pie and every team that steps on a
basketball court had better expect it to be there and fight
to overcome it. UCLA must face tremendous pressure and yet
somehow it seems to carry off a well-disciplined game, even
when their game is off.
The final responsibility for a team's performance must
come down, somewhat unfairly, somewhat appropriately, on
the coach. Although he does not do the shooting, passing or
playing the defense, he does coordinate those activities.
More importantly, he must insure the correct and proper
operation of those aspects by his squad. He, therefore, must
work to relieve inter-group tension. He must shield his
players psychologically from the omnipresent pressure that
can be so crippling.
All successful coaches have managed to discipline their
teams in such a manner so that they do not get rattled. Wooden
See BORUS, This Page, Column 8

PISTONS SHOCK BRAVES:
*~ * r

Jruin s

clip

By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Doug Roberts' fourth
goal of the season in the final
minute of play gave the Boston
Bruins a 5-4 victory over the De-
troit Red Wings in a nationally
televised National Hockey League
game last night.
The victory pushed the Bruins
into sole possession of second place
in the NHL East, two points ahead
of the New York Rangers. Detroit
remained in fourth, one point in
front of Buffalo.
Wayne Cashman paced the Bos-
ton attack with his 27th and 28th
goals of the season. Ken Hodge
and Don Marcotte scored one goal
apiece for Boston.
Henry Boucha, Guy Charron,
Thommie Bergman and Mickey
Redmond scored for the Wings.
Goalie Ross Brooks extended his
undefeated streak to 13 games,
with 10 victories and three ties for
the Bruins.
* * *
Pistons pop
DETROIT-Forward Don Adams
scored a career-high 36 points last!
night, leading the Detroit Pistons
to a 121-100 National Basketball
Association victory over the Buf-
falo Braves.
Adams, who set his previous NBA
high of 33 points with the former'
San Diego Rockets, hit for 19
points in the first half when the
Pistons moved ahead 55-44.
Buffalo managed to cut the gap
to five points with five minutes
left in the third period before two
baskets by Dave Bing and another

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITORS:
THERESA SWEDO
ROBIN WAGNER

'I
I
r

Wing9K
Chenier scored 10 of his 20 points
in the fourth period after the Cel-
tics had rallied from a 57-40 deficit
to within 75-71.
Dave Cowens sparked the Celtics
in the second half with 15 of his
23 points and pulled down 19 re-
bounds.
The Bullets also got 17 pointsa
from Mike Riordan and 14 from
Archie Clark as they beat Boston
for the first time in five tries.
John Havlicek chipped in with 22
for te Cetics.

spark the Cleveland Cavaliers to a
114 09 victory over the Kansas
City Onmaha Kings in a National
Basket5,all Association game Ia a
night.
T ,e Cavaliers opened up a 14-
poim lead in the first quarter, Irut
the KR.gs came back to tie t-e
score at 32-all early in the seKonI
period.
BORUS

5-4

by Curtis Rowe started a flurry
which restored the Pistons to an
11-point lead.
Buffalo again rallied to within
five points before the Pistons broke
loose in the final period to post
their 24th home victory of the sea-
son and tie a club record set two
years ago.
The Pistons had five other play-
ers in double figures, including
Bob Lanier with 19 points and Bing
with 18.
Bing also had seven assists 'o
raise his season total to 561, break-
ing his own team record of 546
set four years ago.
Rookie Bob McAdoo, with 28
points, and Bob Kauffman, with
22, topped the Braves, who have
now lost eight of their last 10
games.
The game was marked by 66
turnovers-40 of them by Buffalo,
including 17 in the last quarter.
E*
Celts creamed
BALTIMORE- Second-half
heroics by Elvin Hayes and Phil
Chenier paced the Baltimore Bul-
lets to a 103-97 National Basketball
Association victory over Boston
last night that snapped the Celtics'
eight-game winning streak.
Hayes scored 12 of his game-
high 29 points in the third quarterl
and hauled down 17 rebounds while

The Bullets outscored Boston 12-4 of UCLA, Musselman of Minnesota,
early in the fourth quarter to gain until he somewhat mysteriously
an 87-73 edge that the Celtics deserted them by talking about
could only cut down to 99-93 with the Florida head coaching job,
1. 43 left. Driessel of Maryland all keep their
* * * squad together and though they
may not win every game they do
Suns Sunk stay close. Their style is branded
ATLANTA--Lou Hudson and Pete on their teams. Michigan lacked
Maravich combined for 63 points that brand.
as the Atlanta Hawks beat the Maybe the players did not want
Phoenix Suns 135-127 in a National to win badly enough, maybe the
Basketball Association game last press and the fans were just too
n~lit. critical, maybe the talent was not
Hudson poured in 38 points anJ all there, maybe one more player
Maravich added 25 to hand the would have made the difference,
Sunr their fifth defeat in the last maybe that on point loss to Purdue
six games. was just too disheartening for any
Atlanta led most of the way but coach to bring his boys back.
the Suns grabbed narrow advant- Those are a lot of maybes. They
ages twice in the first half. The could all be correct. But the nag-
Hawks held a 76-67 lead at inter, ging suspicion remains that this
mission. basketball squad could have done
Eariy in the fourth quarter, a lot more.
Atlanta spurted to a 22-point lea,
116.94. Phoenix chipped away and -
pulledi within seven points with .I
2:tT remaining in the contest, but S COv E
could come no closer. _______
Cnarlie Scott scored 29 points
for the Suns while Dick Van Ars- NBA
dale zdded 23. Detroit 121, Buffalo 100

AP Photo
Tumbling records
MARTHA WATSON OF LONG BEACH, Calif., set a new American
record for the women's indoor long jump last night. Performing
in the second annual U.S.-Russian AAU sponsored track meet in
Richmond, Va., she jumped 21 feet, 4 inches.

IN AAU TRACK FEUD
Player injunction thwarts NCAA

^' j_* * * Baltimore 103, Boston 97
Atlanta 135, Phoenix 127
Cavs crush Milwaukee 99, Chicago 91, overtime
CLEVELAND - Reserve Bobby ABA
'Bingo" Smith scored 21 points to ! rIndiana 98, New York 89
Virginia 123, Carolina 118
San Diego 113, Dallas 107
I ?,JNCAA College Hocnkey

By The Associated Press
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association was barred temporar-
ily yesterday from taking any ac-
tion against member athletes com-
peting in last night's USSR-USA'
indoor dual track meet.
At a hastily called news con-
ference in Richmond, Va., the AAU
said the order was issued earlier
in the day after a hearing before
U.S. District Court Judge Albert
V. Bryan Jr. in the case of two
athletes who had announced they,
would defy NCAA threats of penal-
ties.
The order is effective until
March 20, when Bryan will hear
arguments on either a temporary
or permanent injunction to pre-
'vent penalties against pentath-
lon competitor Fred Samara of
Pennsylvania and middle dis-
tance runner Dennis Walker of
Adelphi.
Samara and Walker brought
Friday's action against the NCAA
in behalf of themselves and any'
assisasss sass ssiimisais mas

other collegiate athletes affected.I
Six other collegians who had
been named to the American team
dropped out of the meet, however,
after the NCAA threatened penal-
ties against them and their schools
because it contended the AAU had
not sought certification for the
meet against the Russians.
The Amateur Athletic Union,
governing body of most Olympic-!
type amateur sports in America,t
had arranged a track and fieldt
meet with the Russians in Rich-j
mond, Va., tonight and a basket-I
ball series with the Soviet Union's
Olympic champion team later.
To present a good show against
ts big international sports rival,
the United States needs all the
help it can get, including top col-
lege athletes.
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association, which governs ther
sports programs of some 700 col-
leges and universities, refused the
use of its athletes until the AAU
applies for NCAA certification-in
other words, until the AAU says,
"please."
The AAU argues it doesn't have.
to, under arbitrary agreements$
hammered out first by the late1
Gen. Douglas MacArthur in 1963
and later in 1968 by a special five-+
man committee empaneled by Vice1

President Hubert Humphrey.
Al McGuire of Marquette Uni-
versity was invited to coach the
U.S. basketball team in the
series against Russia this spring.
He was told by the NCAA that
he couldn't do it. Also, the NCAA
sent out a directive that college
players also would be denied the
right to play.
This left the United States with
the prospect of an inferior team
to meet the team that beat the
Americans out of a gold medal in
Munich in a wild, controversial
finish.
The NCAA explanation was that
it did not want its basketball play-
ers competing out of season and
at a period when they should be
devoting themselves to their books.
The AAU argued it has jurisdic-
tion over international events and
refused to ask the NCAA to certify
the meet. The AAU also pointed
out the meet had not been certified
last year.
In the case of the six athletes
who dropped off the team, the
AAU said it now was too late to
bring them to Alexandria, Va., for
the meet. Two others, triple jump-
er Barry McClure of Middle Ten-
nessee and shot putter Jesse Stuart
of Western Kentucky, had been
here but left.

Yanks offer DiMaggio job;
Harvard's hoop mentor fired
By The Associated PressI
* SAN FRANCISCO-Joe DiMaggio said yesterday he is consider-
ing a front office job with the New York Yankees, the team with which
he earned a place in baseball's Hall of Fame.
DiMaggio, 59, said he talked with the new co-owners of the
Yankees, Michael Burke and George Steinbrenner, in New York
recently and had another meeting with them coming up soon.
DiMaggio said he would decide about the Yankee job "when I
find out in writing and when all details are clear in, my mind."
* * *
* CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-Harvard University, Friday, fired its
head basketball coach, Robert W. Harrison.
Athletic Director Robert B. Watson said he believed the change
"is in the best long range interests of the program. It was a par-
ticularly difficult step to take because Coach Harrison is such an
admirable person."
Harrison, a Michigan gradue and Harvard's head coach the past
five years, compiled a 59-70 record. Harvard was 45-33 over the past
three .seasons, the university's first winning basketball campaign
since 1927-1928.
" IRVINE, Calif.-Bill Toomey, the all-around athlete who won
the 1968 decathlon Olympic title for the United States, has been
appointed track and field coach of the University of California at
Irvine.
Toomey, now 34, also set a world record of 8,417 points which
stood until the 1972 Olympic Games at Munich.
He has been a television sports commentator, a member of the
President's sports group and a member of the United States Olympic
Committee.
"I've been so excited, I find it difficult to stop thinking about
coaching long enough to sleep at night," Toomey said.
* * *
* FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - Sparky Lyle, ace New York
Yankee relief pitcher, ended his holdout yesterday and signed his
1973 contract for an estimated $75,000.
Agreement between Lyle, his agent Harold Meizler, and Yanks
general manager Lee MacPhail came after a prolonged session.

Wisconsin 6, Cornell 5, overtime
NHL
Boston 5, Detroit 4
High School Basketball
Class A
Ann Arbor Pioneer 61, Kalamazoo
Central 55
Detroit Northwestern 67,
Detroit Catholic 57
Detroit southwestern 81, Romulus 69
Detroit Murray-Wright 83,
Livonia Churchill 47
Grand Rapids Christian 66,
Muskegon 61
Class B
Dearborn Divine Child 58,
Marysville 43
Hudson Unity Christian 76,
Grand Rapids South Christian 65
Class C
Byron Center 90, Ravenna 79
Battle Creek St. Philip 78,
Eau Claire 61'
Class D
Ann Arbor St. Thomas 54,-
Grosse Point University Liggett 53
Flint Holy Rosary 92, Caseville 56

Bost(
New
Buff,
Phil
Balt
Atla
Hlous
Clev
Milw
Chi
lDett
K.C.
Los
Gold
Pho
ESeati
Portl
Cleve
New
Pet'

Pro Standings
NBA
not including last night's games
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
WV 11iPct. GiB
ton 64) 13 .822 -
York 55 22 .714 7
alo 21 51 .292 381%
adelphia 9 67 .118 52,z
Central Division
iimore 46 27 .630 -
nta 42 32 .568 47.
iston 30) 44 .405 16z'
eland 26 46 .361 191/
Western Conference
Midwest Division
xaukee 52 22 .703 -
ago 48 26 .649 4
oil 33 441 .452 18'
-Omaha 34 42 .447 19
Pacific Division .
Angeles 55 19 .743 -
den State 44 30 .595 11
enix 34 41 .453 21%
the 24 51 .320(1?'
land 17 57 .230 38
Today's Games
veland at Buffalo
imore at Philadelphia
York at Golden State
roit at Chicago

3.
I
C
e
,r
._',
v4
I
i
f

Final Michigan B-Ball stats
(24 games-Thru-3-12-73)

G FG-FGA FT-FTA

Wilmore
Russell
Brady
'Johnson, E
Johnson, J
Kupec
Lockard
Britt
Buss
Kantner
Whitten
Tyler
Ayler
Schinnerer
Rogers
Kuzma

r.

24
24
24
24
24
22
13
11
7
8
6
4
6
3
4
1
24
24

203-456 117-148
177-404 88-121
131-247 49-75
124-224 43-69
65-163 31-44
39-92 30-42
14-29 11-15
14-36 4-6
6-11 1-4
4-12 4-7
2-3 2-2
2-4 0-2
3-8 1-4
1-1 0-0
1-4 1-4
0-0 0-0
786-1694 382-543
777-1766 305-439

Rbs Pts
144 523
231 442
221 311
183 291
32 161
69 108
25 39
19 32
2 13
6 12
5 6
1 4
5 7
0 2
3 3
0 0
1134 1954
1056 1859

t
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.,
i
kl
rE
i
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i

t
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.,
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rE
i
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Book Sale Tomorrow .
At your University Cellar
9-10 P.M. WEEKDAYS/11-5 P.M. WEEKENDS

NHL
East
W L .T

GA
9 1581

Pts (,F

Montreal
N.Y. Rangers
Boston
{IDetroit
Buffalo
Toronto
Vancouver
N.Y. Islanders
Chicago
Minnesota
Philadelphia
St. Louis
Los Angeles
Pittsburgh
Atlanta
California

47 9 14 108 289

44 18
45 20
A* 24
33 25
24 36
19 43
9 58
West
39 23
34 27
33 27
30 29
28 32
28 35
24 32
11 44

7
5
11
12
9
8
5
9
10
11
11
7
14
15

95
95
79
78
57
46
23
86
77
76
71
67
63
61
37

271
292
229
230
212
205
147

179 MICHIGAN
207 Opponents
193 - - - -

233
307
321

r

r-

254 201 I
234 204
255 232
205 215
208 224
225 232'
175 201
180 295

GOT THEM OLD HOUSING BLUES?

MISSED OUR FIRST RUSH?

Today's Games
Boston at Detroit, afternoon
Buffalorat Montreal
New York Rangers at Toronto
St. Louis at New York Islanders
SPittsburgh at Vancouver
Chicago at Atlanta
Minnesota at Los Angeles

P

I

DEL

A THETA

MIDNIGHT
MEG ILLA READING

Invites You To An Open House
SUNDAY, MARCH 18-7-10 P.M.

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