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March 01, 1973 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-03-01

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Page Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, March 1, 1973

HOSTAGES HELD:

iii

1

Indians take S. Dakota

town'

Lease

(Continued from Page 1)
Oglala tribal chairman Dick Wil-
son said the post recently had re-
ceived a new shipment of rifles
and the Indians .could possibly
hold out "for weeks."
After the daylight exchange of
gunfire, federal marshals moved'
back some distance from the posts
they had occupied during the
night.
The FBI said at least 17 per-I
sons .were arrested as they at-,
tempted to get out of the area.

The Indians also took over a
Roman Catholic church located on
the heights overlooking the site of
the Wounded Knee massacre,
where U. S. cavalry killed more
than 200 Sioux in 1890.
Visitors to the area were halted
at nearby Pine Ridge, which it-
self showed signs as if it were
under siege.
Sandbags were piled atop and
within the Bureau of Indian Af-
fairs (BIA) office at Pine Ridge,

and the doors were locked. Mar-
shals could be seen moving in-
side.

uncertain as to the nature of the
dispute and the Indians demands.
He said none of them as of an

Ju . ,I au 11C UL LM1, C 1
During the early siege action, early hour yesterday, had been
the Indians burned a wooden transmitted "to anyone in the
bridge carrying a highway into Bureau of Indian Affairs or the
Wounded Knee. Department of Interior."
Wilson contended that Russell Wounded Knee was the site of
Means, another AIM leader, was the last major battle of the Indian
one of the group of Indians holed wars.
up in the church. A band of Sioux Indians, fleeing
Wilson said that the whole seiz- into the South Dakota badlands
ure may have been sparked by a after the death in 1890 of Sitting
beating administered to Means at Bull - who defeated General
Pine Ridge Tuesday by a reserva- George Custer at the celebrated
tion Indian. Battle of the 'Little Bighorn two
The Indians submitted a list of years before - was captured by
three demands to various federal U. S. Cavalry and taken to Wound-
agencies, saying they would stay ed Knee.
in Wounded Knee until they got When the cavalry insisted on dis-
answers from the federal govern- arming them, the Indians resist-
ment. ed. Within minutes some 200 In-
But in Washington, a spokesman dians - men, women and chil-
for the BIA said they still were dren - were massacred.
Local Indians support
South Dakota take-over

t
l
r

getting

you

down?

AP Photo
Campaign spendthrift
Robert Vesco, charged by the Securities and Exchange Commission
in a massive fraud, has also, according to papers filed in a federal
court, secretly contributed $200,000 to the Nixon campaign. Vesco's
activities were under investigation when the generous contribution
was made last April.
Drug robbery victim
evicted ro m dorm

By SUE STEPHENSON
"My first reaction," to th6 news
of the takeover of the trading post
at Wounded Knee, South Dakota,
was, "I want to be there," states
Wayne Johnson, member of the
Chippewa Bear Clan and the Na-
tive American Student Association
(NASA).
"NASA is in full support," said
Moose Pamp, also a member of
the newly formed University or-
ganization, NASA, and of the Chip-
pewa Turtle Clan. "Some members
are going there Friday," he added.
"The whole association (40 Uni-
versity students)," Pamp said, "is
ready to take up arms if it's going
to benefit our people."
According to Pamp, "the average
age of native Americans (Indians)
is 23 years." By this time "he
either has a prison or a military
record," Pamp said and added,
"We know what it's like to shoot or
be shot at."
"This is something we should all
work for,' Johnson said, referring
to the attaining of Indian rights.
Then Pamp went on to talk about
the Bureau of Indian Affairs' (BIA)
program of "relocation."
"The BIA tells you they're going
to take you off the reservation, put
you in the city and get you a job,"
Pamp said. "Then what they do is
take you off the reservation, put
you in a city like Chicago and give
r
GET
ATTENTION:

you a job making bows and arrows
at $1.65 an hour," Pamp said.
And he added that three out of
four Indians involved in the pro-
gram of relocation, return to the
reservation.
Describing the newly formed
University organization, N A S A,
Pamp said that "The people who
speak up-control the organization
-are radical."
Members of NASA also belong
to the Great Lakes Indian Youth
Alliance (600 members) which is
an affiliate of the national Ameri-
can Indian Movement.
Meanwhile, city police officers
sit outside the Exhibit Museum,
the supposed location of the con-
troversial Indian skeletal remains
which local Indians are requesting
be returned to their "mother
earth."
WANTED
(DEAD OR ALIVE)
People or Person
to run upcoming
PIRGIM election.
No experience
required.
Come to meeting
TON IGHT
7:30 p.m.-1511 SAB
financial
REWARD

Suble t

your
UMMER

apart ment ih

0

5i

BLE

UPLEMENT

(Continued from Page 1) ,
thinks I pose a threat to theI
Quad." .
Student Government C o u n c i I
lawyer Tom Bentley, who hasp
agreed to act as attorney for
Hoitt, stated that "If the Univer-
sity evicts him, legal action is
likely."+
SGC President Bill Jacobs and!
others joined Hoitt at the later
meeting in challenging .Feldkamp,,
who claimed the eviction "may,
discourage the kind of drug-related
behavior that has caused this new
problem of armed robberies in the
dorms." ~
Jacobs called Feldkamp's moveI
"ridiculous," charging that thej
housing director has "made an ex-1
ample of one student and in soI
doing only serves to inconvenience
that student."1
Feldkamp responded that the+
1L

eviction "isn't seen by anyone in
the University as an action that
will stop all armed robberies."
"This is simply the course we've'
chosen to take at this time to dis-
courage the kind of illegal activity
that causes the danger."
When asked if he felt the new
eviction policy would indeed dis-
courage armed robberies, -Feld-
kamp answered, "I don't know.
How should I know? We're just
trying it out."
When several students insisted
that Hoitt's eviction would only
"frighten kids away from report-
ing any robberies," Feldkamp said
"It may have that effect at first.
I'm no crime expert, but I think
after a while it'll be effective."
Feldkamp reiterated that his
decision was "not final", but add-
ed that "I don't forsee a reversal
on this."
4 ')

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Michigan Daily's Summer
Sublet Supplement appear-
ing in March.

FOR ONLY
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Student groups sue u
(Continued from Page 1) fied mpterial on the mean and
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lic scrutiny, and potential criticism sonnel by unit, but did not list
of the University's employment individual salaries or names.
policies." At the same time, Bentley had
If the suit is upheld. the Univer- filed a friend of the court brief in
sity would not be the first state the Bay City case. He found him-
institution of higher learning to self without a case, however, when
release salary information. an appeal of this salary release
Last year, the trustees of Michi- decision was dropped.
gan State University voted to re- "We then decided if we were
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after the faculty payroll was made gto take tin , ewo lyv
public. to take the initiative," Bentley'
Shortly thereafter, a Bay City said, and work was begun on the
newspaper sued Delta College and present suit.
Saginaw Valley College, demanding A regental resolution forbids SGC
that their salary lists be released. from using its funds to sue the
This action was upheld by a county University. The council could lose
circuit judge and the colleges its $1.00 student assessment fee if
joined MSU in releasing the data. the resolution was followed to the
Last summer, former Daily edi- letter.
tor Alan Lenhoff wrote a letter to Bentley, however, said last nightj
Fleming asking to make the Uni- that "the Regents probably won'tI
versity salaries public information. cut off all SGC funding. If anythinga
The Regents rejected this request, is affected, it would be the money
but slid release theretofore classi- for the legal advocate."

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3433 Burbank Dr.
Ann Arbor
Phone 665-7103
Editorial consultant: I will
edit dissertations, term papers,
etc., for grammar and sen-
tence structure. This service
is particularly beneficial to
foreign students.

'

FACE

IT

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ACCEPTED BY PHONE

i

A

TRANSCENDENTAL

MEDITATION4
as taught by
MAHARISHI MAHESH YOGI
O NATURAL TECHNIQUE DEVELOPS FULL
CREATIVE ABILITIES

Few complexions are naturally perfect.
Some people think that acne, like the common cold, has to
run its course. European-trained Catherine Alexander knows

ii

1111

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41

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