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March 01, 1973 - Image 9

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Michigan Daily, 1973-03-01

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Thursday, March 1, 1973

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nime

Thursday, March 1, 1973 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

CHESS

,I

I

It's Begovac .. .
. ... if he plays
MIKE DUWECK
The Michigan Junior Chess Championship will be held this
weekend at Oakland University in Rochester, Michigan. Playing
strength being what it is among most juniors (under 21), the
group of players from which the new champion will emerge is
small and easily definable.
Certainly in contention this year is reigning champion Steve
Feldman. Feldman, who happens to be a freshman at the big 'U',
is an expert who has been playing in local tournaments for the
past four years. Last summer he beat a senior master from
Wisconsin in a stunning upset, and finished fourth in the Michigan
Championship last September.
Josip Begovas, an exchange high school student from Yugo-
slavia, has to be the top challenger to Feldman's crown. In his
native country, Begovac was considered of "candidate master'
strength, roughly equivalent to a United States expert rating. He
has been playing in local tournaments, winning a number of them.
He has lost only two or three serious matches since
coming to Michigan last summer. He should be in top form
going into this tourney, having just won the Southern Michigan
Open two weekends ago. Reports have circulated, though,
that Begovac may not appear at the tourney due to the lack of
a prize fund.
Expert Tom Sloan, of East Detroit, is a strong contender for
the title. A successful chess organizer as well as player, Sloan
is the current Region V junior champion. Region V covers
Michigan, Ohio and Indiana.
Expert Richard Borgen, a student at MSU, is a strong con-
tender, with three years of high level play behind him. He is also
the current MSU champion (whatever that's worth).
Ray Stone, of Windsor, Ontario, has been an expert for two
years, and was for some time the Detroit area's only junior
player of that caliber. Stone is a chess journalist (the kid ob-
viously knows a prestigious position when he sees it), having
written articles on Spassky and Fischer, both of whom he has met.
Unfortunately, chess ability is not gained by osmosis, making
Stone a contender, but not a favorite.
Probably the best of the dark horse threats to the 18, 19 and
20-year-old experts is 15-year-old Bob Savage. Although he is not
an expert, he has been improving rapidly and will win at least
one major upset in this tourney.
Last and least, there is me. I figure on being at the short
end of the game that grabs the quickest' mate award. It's my
devious plan to get into the record books of the 1973 MJC.
The following are my predictions for the tourney. If Begovac
enters, the results will be: Begovac, 6-0; Feldman, Sloan, 5-1;
Borgen, Stone, Savage, 4/2-1%. If Begovac doesn't enter, the
results will be: Feldman, 6-0; Sloan, Borgen, 5-1; Stone, Savage,
41/2-1/2
* * *
The United States Championship Playoffs concluded two weeks
ago with these results:
First-Robert Byrne scored 3-1-He defeated and drew both
Reshevsky and Kavalek.
Second-Samuel Reshevsky scored 2-2-He lost and drew with
Byrne, won and drew with Kavalek.
Third-Lubomir Kavalek scored 1-3-He drew and lost to both
Byrne and Reshevsky.
By placing first and second, Byrne and Reshevsky win the
right to represent the U.S. in the 1973 Interzonal tournament
which determines the players who will fight it out for the right
to challenge Fischer in the 1975 World Championship Match.
Observers felt Byrne played the steadiest chess while Reshevsky
played the most interesting games. Kavalek was clearly not up
to form. Reshevsky, when asked who he felt would be the next
challenger to Fischer for the World Championship, answered that
there was "no doubt it will be Reshevsky."
Local expert Ben Crane commented on Reshevsky's perform-
ance, saying it was a good result for him. He added, however,
that the Interzonal tournament, which is much longer and tends
to wear a player down, would be to the disadvantage of the 63-
year-old Reshevsky, by far the oldest active U.S. Grandmaster.
* ~* *
Josip Begovac and Robert Ciaffone scored 5-0 results in
the Southern Michigan Open, February 17-18, in Detroit.
Tournament director Tom Sloan handed out $1,030 to the
numerous prize winners in the 107 player event.
The tournament was not particularly strong, with only one
master, four experts, and 10 Class A players participating. John
Brooks and Thomas LaForge tied for third place in the tourney
and first place in Class A. John Midock, Atilla Lehotsky, and Tom
Jenkins tied for first, Class B. Sam Willner and Mike Gaiefsky
tied for first, Class C. Jim Daniluk and Ian Callum tied for first,

Class D-E. The Unrated prize was won by Joseph Holstein and
Ricky Moore. Bob Savage was best junior.
If you're looking for chess activity this weekend, it is all
going to be at the Michigan Junior Championship at Oakland
University, Walton Blvd., Rochester, Michigan. Three tourneys
will all be going at the same time. Registration for all three ends
at 9:30 a.m., Saturday. The Junior Championship, being played
Saturday and Sunday, is open to all under 21. The Young Junior
Champonship, open to all under 12, will be played Saturday only.
Both of these are six round Swiss tourneys. The Junior
Sponsor's Tournament, played Saturday and Sunday, is a five
round Swiss tourney open to anyone who wishes to support the
Junior Championship. Rumor has it that many strong players will
y, participate, local master Wes Burgar among them..

Swimmers

splash

for lea
By BOB SIMON
Just because this year's Big Ten
swim meet will bring back memo-
ries of the past 12 years of con-
ference pool action doesn't mean
it won't be exciting. Some of the
greatest individual efforts in the
nation will be on display at Matt
Mann over the weekend. Also, a
great scramble for high team fin-
ishes behind Indiana is predicted.
The meet starts today and con-
cludes with the finals on Saturday.
The preliminaries each day start
at 1:00 in the afternoon with tthe
finals set to begin at 7:30 p.m.
daily.
For the last 12 years, Indiana,
under the guidance of Coach Doc
Counsilman, has captured the
Big Ten crown. In each of those
years it was the Wolverines who
were relegated to the anonymous
second place finish. Neither team
figures to move from these seem-
ingly permanent consignments
this year.
The Hoosiers lost the glamorous
Mark Spitz. But they also kept a
large number of swimmers, be-
sides recruiting many more fine
talents. According to Counsilman
and Michigan Coach Gus Stager
thi4 is the best Hoosier team ever,
and the lengthening of Indiana's
dual-meet string of victories to 88
leads no one to suspect differently.
More important than Counsilman
to the team's success hasbeenthe
tremendous individuals that, have

gue

honors

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM ECKER
swum for Indiana. The present is
no exception as the Hoosiers' John
Kinseila, Gary Hall, John Murphy,
Mike Stamm and Gary Connelly
all will put on brilliant displays of
speed and endurance. ,
Probably the most outstanding
swimmer in the meet will be Kin-
sella. The former Sullivan award
winner has been destroying all
competition during the dual meet'
season with his long distance
swims, including a memorable vic-
tory over Michigan's Tom Szuba
three weeks ago.
Just last week Kinsella set yet
another NCAA record in the 1000-
yard freestyle event. He chopped
eight seconds off his previous rec-
ord, so now all opposition must
shoot for his unbelievable mark of
9:09.5. Kinsella also holds Ameri-
can records for the 500 and 1650
yard events.
AS MENTIONED previously, the
rest of the Hoosiers are not far
behind Kinsella, if at all. Hall holds
the nation's fastest time in the 200
butterfly this year along with
possessing records in the 200 and
400 individual m e d 1 e y events.
Stamm holds the nation's best time.
in the 200 yard backstroke eventa
with a clocking of 1:50.6 and heI
has never been beaten.
All together, the Hoosiers are
the owners of seven of the nation's
SCOlElS 7
NBA
Boston 118, Golden State 111
Philadelphia 102, Baltimore 96
Seattle at Milwaukee,. inc.
K.C.=Omaha at Phoenix, inc.
NHL
Chicago 3, N.Y. Rangers 3
Pittsburgh 4, St. Louis 2
Detroit 6, Philadelphia 5
Toronto 7, Vancouver 2
Minnesota 7, California 3
Los Angeles at Montreal, inc.
ABA
New York 115, Memphis 108
Indiana 109, San Diego 106
Kentucky 117, Virginia 97
Carolina at Denver, inc.

fastest times in the 11 events that
have been run in dual meets.
Therefore, Michigan must be satis-
fied with second.
Michigan's solidity and depth will
help. them avoid finishing any
worse than second, though. The
breaststroke is where the Wolver-
ines will pick up many of their
points as a one, two, three finish
is not out of the question.
The Blue's Stu Isaac is the out-
standing individual in this stroke.
He not only is the defending Big
Ten champ but has continued to
break his own records in the 200-
yard event all season. No one has
much of a chance of catching him.
Mike Whitaker and Pat Bauer are
the other specialists in this stroke
who will finish high.
The other area where Michigan
can pick up some much needed
points is in the diving competition.
This could be the most exciting
part of the meet, as Michigan's
Joe Crawford will be attempting to
capture championships off both
boards.
The rest of the teams will be
fighting for spots in the first divi-
sion. Now that Ohio State has
fallen apart the battle for third is
left open for three squads. Illinois
has one of its finest teams ever
with individuals like George Con-
grave, Greg Scott and Russ Meyer.
Right behind them will be a
young and improved Michigan
State contingent which features
sprinter Bruce Wright, Alan Dilley
and Ken Winfield. Wisconsin also
has a chance to finish in the first
five. After that the teams get
{ progressively worse.
ART IN ANN ARBOR
Speaker:
MRS. FRANKLIN FORSYTHE
of Forsythe Galleries
Paintings will be
shown and discussed
by Mrs. Forsythe
10:30 A.M., SUN., MARCH 4
502 W. HURON
ALL ARE WELCOME
TO THIS RARE OCCASION
MEET INTERESTING
PEOPLE
Everyone Welcome!
BACH CLUB-

Flying high

23rd STRAIGHT ROAD LOSS

Spartans

slaughter

By ROBIN WAGNER
Special to The Daily
EAST LANSING-Scoring seven
goals in the final two periods,
Michigan State's hockey team ran
away from Michigan's icers last
night, 9-3. After holding a 2-1 lead
for the first period, the Wolverines
stalled on offense and were non-
chalantly blown out of the arena
by the Spartans.
The game possessed a constantly
changing complexion. At times,
both squads "displayed incentive
and hustle, while at other times,

the action was as emotional and
inspiring as playing with toy boats
in a bathtub.
Six minutes into the opening rer-
iod, Michigan initiated the scring.
After a Randy Neal shot was block-
ed by Spartan goalie Tom Bowen,
Julian Nixon and Don Dufek both
failed to put in the rebound. Don'
Fardig then collected the puck.
briefly stickhandled and shot it
through a pile'ip in front of the net
and into the twine.
Ten minutes later, MSU's Bren-
don Aaroney, receiving a pass
from Tom Ross, knotted the score

f Following this goal Michigan's
dekers were never again in the
game. Seventy seconds after Tru-
deau tallied, Colp left Dennis Olm-
stead a drop-back pass which Olm-
stead proceeded to deposit in the
goal behind Moore.
Colp's brilliant passing spelled
more trouble for Michigan later.
With 15:50 gone in the middle
frame Colp slid a perfect center-
ing pass across Michigan's goal
mouth, past an unaware Moore
and onto the stick of Mark Calder,
who easily scored into the semi-
open net.
THE THIRD PERIOD of play
consisted of a goal-hungry MSU
contingent and a weary Michigan
team. Sturgis opened the three goal
deluge by drilling a backhand shot
along the ice surface, past Moore's
stick and into the net.
Later in the period, Boyd, on a
Spartan power play, fired a slap

leers
shot from the point which directed
itself through a maize of players
and behind the helplessly screened
Moore.
Later, it was the ever-present
Colp again. Engufling a pass from
Maroney, on another power play,
the flashy, flatfooted freshman
blistered a wrist shot high into the
twine from a position directly in
front of Moore. So ended Michigan
State's scoring barrage and Mich-
igan's agony.
In the locker room after the final
buzzer, Renfrew commented, "It's
been a long year. We played our
guts out tonight, though. And I
guarantee one thing. This is going
to be one good hockey team some-
day." Perhapsthose last few words
should be taken to heart.

'Red V
down
in 6-5.

- on a 20 foot slap shot.
(na fstPaul Paris quickly put the Maize'
and Blue back on top with a wrist
shot which deflected off Bowen's
Yitstretched leg and just inside the
Lyerpost. Paris' score was on a power
play after Bob Boyd, MSU's neigh-
borhood bully, had been whistledI
th riiii iiu off the ice for interference. 1
LOeflhImHL1Hntill Ln l n ai Id

_________ I I

eon--- -----JL!-..

1

I

I thpWann iarbor1 T f1 im cooet ive 1

Commentig on the rst pero
Specialto The Daily of play following the contestt
DETROIT - The Detroit Red Michigan Coach Al Renfrew g
Wig ogh akfrma20stated, "We played well. If wFIdRST PERIOD
deficit to overwhelm the Philadel- taken advantage of an SCORING: 1. M-Fardig (Dufek, Nix-
inpaiaatiernhe three raatle any of on) 6:15; 2. S-Maroney (Ross, Sturgis)
phia Leg- meahNrtilast the three breakways we had, it 16:51; 3. M-Paris (Neal, Werner) 17:26.
Hockey League game here last would have been a different CISECOND PERIOD
night. hokygm. SCORING: 4. S-Colp (Boyd, Calder)
In a hockey game 1:05; 5. S - Sturgis (unassisted) 1:50;
penalty-marred contest The second period featured total 6. M-Trudeau (Werner, Neal) 11:01;
Mickey Redmond a n d Marcel Michigan State domination. In the 7. s-Olmstead (Colp, Boyd) 12:11; 8.
Dionne each scored two gaals to stanza's opening two minutes, a S-Calder (Colp) 15:50.
ice the game for the Wings. -in and a rink length THIRD PERIOD
Redmond scored what turned out St e -tip dSCORING:.9.5 Sturgis (Ross, Pave-
to b th winin gol 1i te tirdrush, triple-fake and score by John lich) 2:06. 10. S-Boyd (Colp) 7:04. 11.
to be the winning goal in the thryd'Sturgis put MSU on top, 3-2. S-CoIp (Maroney, Boyd) 13:52.
period when he took a neatly play- The Wolverines still had a bit of SAVES
ed drop pass from Alex Delvee.;hio 'spark left in their loss-ridden a20z 15 12 47
to fire a slap shot past surprised kbodies. Witth 11:01 gone, a wrist s 16 9 20 45
Philadelphia netminder Doug Fa- shot by Randy Trudeau found the GOALS BY PERIODS
vely h upper portion of the twine to again M 123 T
Early in the final stanza it seem- !tie the score.s 1 4 3 8:
ed as if Redmond had earned his t
hat trick when a whistler from the
blue line off the stick of Al Kar- -~
lander changed directions in front
of the net and ripped the crds.
However, it was ruled that the
puck wentt off the Philadelphia de-
fenseman a n d Karlander was,
awarded the tally.
Philly jumped out to a 2-0 lead Make extra bread by bringing back your old
before the Wings could enter into
the scoring column. But swift little comicsscience fictionbaseball cards,
Dionne whipped the puck into theca
net to close the first period gap Beatle magazines, etc.
Ito just a mere one.
The Wings' victory moved them
within two of the idle Sabres.flID flIK II fl RANk N OD Tl
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PLAYING:
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REFRESHMENTS AFTERWARDS
Thursday, March 1, 0 P.M.,
'East Quad, Greene Lounge
CONTRIBUTION 35c
More Info: Eileen, 763-6256

Due to Spring (?) Break, there will be no

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this coming Friday, March 2-73
(but look for our ad when/if you come back)

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Starring DAVID PEEL as FREEMONT ZAPATA

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