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February 27, 1973 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-27

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 27, 1973

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, February 27, 1973

SUPREME COURT DECISIONS:
Abortion, busing rulings made

Ellsberg and Russo
acquitted on 1 count

in two maj or court

!i flC 1 C~

(Continued from Page 1)
other school districts in Roth's
order.
Meanwhile, the entire lawsuit has
been reconsidered by the circuit
court, which is expected to hand
down an opinion later.
After the four districts brought
their argument to the Supreme
Court, the 6th Circuit ruled on Dec.
8 that they must have their day in

court in connection with the bus-
ing of some 40,000 students. But
the districts contend that they
should not be encompassed in a
plan until a finding is made that
they have been engaged in uncon-
stittuional segregation.
Meantime, the Circuit Court held
more arguments on Feb. 8 and
now has a second deciison under
advisement. The school districts

MISUS ;Continued from Page 1)
indictment against Russo, the
judge said, resulted from the gov-
asked the Supreme Court to delay ernment's interpretation of the
action on their appeal until every- word "disposed." Byrne had ques-
one finds out what the appealstioned attorneys at length as to
what was meant by "disposed of"
court finally does. in relation to eventual use of the
- -papers and whether Russo was
BERGAMO, Italy (IP-A postman aware of such planned disposal
when he helped copy the papers.
was arrested for dumping his mail Apparently, Byrne felt he was not
into the River Serio instead of de- aware of any plans to dispose of the

LeRocque, director of the privately
funded Center for Defense Informa-
tion in Washington, D.C., and Sam-
ual Adams, a Central Intelligence
Agency analyst.
Information supplied by Adams
challenging the validity of the tes-
timony of one government witness
was a point of dispute between
government and defense attorneys
last week.
.wr l .W.V. Wfl.V ).4%t /....W .
.vj.4...,.:.Vf.Wt Wftn~t flMtS-

livering -it, police reported.

Stink rises over giant sewer

(Continued from Page 1)
to tertiary treatment capacity.
Ann Arbor officials favored this
plan.
However, in September of
1971, the.WRC decided to approve
plan II. And then the fight be-
gan. '
Ann Arbor forces, led by May-'
or Robert Harris and city admin-
istrator Guy Larcom, began a
year-long battle to reverse the
WRC decision. They sought and
Indians ask
for return
of skeletons
(Continued from Page 1)
"We speak as .an Indian com-
munity," said Boyd and "burial is
a sensitive issue to my people.
Everything else has been taken
from our people," he continued,
"and at this point we can't even
rest in peace."
"Our people r e c o g n i z e that
science is necessary to some ex-
tent," Boyd explained, "but exca-
vations of Indian remains should
be returned to a religious environ-
ment and not sit on the University
shelves for 20 years."
He added that the bones have
been "researched to their fullest
extent."I
Smith responded that "we should
not believe that there is a limited
span of time in which materials
cease to be of value." He also said
that he would go ahead and make
the report to the Regents, but that
it wouldn't be as effective as it
could have been had the Indians
"not staged such a publicity
stunt."
After the meeting with Smith,
the Indians proceeded across cam-
pus to the University's Exhibit
Museum and for two hours chant-
ed various songs to the soft rumble
of an inter-tribal drum.
Attempting to persuade the more
militant Indians to leave the mu-
seum after having been there for
nearly two hours, John Shano,
medicine man of the Chippewa
Tribe, said, "We have our own way
of doing things and others don't.
understand."
After approximately two hours,
the Indians dispersed, with some
members threatening to return
"at a later date with a larger
group (of Indians) and more pub-
licity."
Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
Fully accredited, 20-year UNI-
VERSITY OF ARIZONA Guada-
lajara Summer School offers
July 2-August 11, anthropol-
ogy, art, education, folklore,
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$211. Write: International Pro-
grams, University of Arizona,
Tucson 85721.

received a WRC rehearing on the
matter. WRC stuck to its original
decision. Harris tried to persuade
the Southeastern Michigan Coun-
cil of Governments (SEMCOG)
to oppose the Super Sewer plan,
or at least withhold endorsement
of the plan. SEMCOG endorsed
it.
Failing to reverse the WRC de-
cision, Harris enlisted the aid of
Congressman Marvin Esch, and
carried his cause to the Environ-
mental Protection Agency, ask-
ing it to conduct- an environ-
mental imp-act study of the pro-
posed interceptor system.
Although the EPA has ultimate
authority over construction of all
waste treatment plants,*it had
previously -abided by the recom-
mendations of the WRC. In this
case, however, due to protracted
opposition from Harris, and ris-
ing objections of environmental
groups, it agreed last June to
conduct its own environmental
study of the project, and make
re ^ornmendations.
The EPA study, ho we v er,
which was released late last
week, recommends plan II. Har-
ris said he will review the EPA
study and file a reply within 30
days.
Proponents of the Super Sewer
make two principal claims:
-The regional system wouldj
have an overall lower cost; and,
-The regional system would'
make the Huron River below Ann
Arbor cleaner, and safe for
swimming or "total body con-
tact" in sanitation parlance.
Ann Arbor officials debunk
both of these claims. Harris re-
plied that the overall cost of
plan II is not cheaper than plan
MB because "the consultant's re-
port doesn't take into account all

of the costs of plan II."
A major unaccounted for cos
of plan II is that of augmentin
the flow of the river during dr
seasons.
"If we take water out of tl
Huron, and don't put anythin
back in, the river will dry up i
drought seasons," Harris ex
plained.
The solution is either to buil
more dams on the river or fo
Ann Arbor to buy all its wate
from Detroit. Either solutioni
extremely expensive, andisa
expense which Ann Arbor offi
cials say should be included i
thQ cost of plan II.
Both plan II and plan IB ca
for a secondary treatment plan
at the mouth of the Huron o
-Lake Erie, and this fact raise
the ire of many enviroi
mentalists.

Spapers. DAILY OFFICIAL
"It was a real victory," said BULLETIN
Russo later. "Considering what we
had expected, it was a very good ?a?.r? '?. . N
day." He said he had expected TEDY ERAY2
dismissal of the count against
Ellsberg, but not the count against DAY CALENDAR
him. Music School: Trumpet student re-
cital, SM Recital Hall, 12:30 pm.
st "By the time we get through Statistics Seminar: T. Cacoullos, U
g with the defense, there will be of Athens, Greece, "Best Estimation
y nothing left for the jury to con- Under Truncation," 4014 Nat. Sci. Bldg.,
Creative Arts Festival: "All Things
1e The judge held in abeyance his That Are, Are Lights," discussion-
ruling on the request to drop two screening with underground filmmaker
g more counts of the indictment, Stan Brakhage, Aud. 3, MLB, 3 pm.
in Future worlds Lecture Series: J. B.
which mentioned transmittal of the Rhine, dir., Fdn. for Res. on the Na-
x- papers to unindicted coconspirator ture of Man, Duke U., "Psychic Phe-
Vu Van Thai, a former South Viet- nomena and its Implications for 'the

FS

71

d
ar
r
is
n
n
s
it

namese ambassador. Future," Hill Aud., 3 pm.
LSA Coffee Hour: Ctr. for Afro-
The government has failed so American & African Studies, 1100 S.
far in its efforts to introduce into Univ., 3 pm.
evidence the fingerprints of Thai, Near East Langs. & Lits-Ctr. for Near
East & N. African Studies-Hist. of Art:
but said it would present new foun- L. D. Levine, RoyalOntario Museum,
dation for such an admission when "Mesopotamia and the Rise of a Mid-
court opens Tuesday. The judge dIe," 1528 CC Little, 4 pm.
Botany Seminar: A. Bennet, Brook-
says he will rule then on those haven Nat'l Lab, "Structural & Meta-
two counts. bolic Investigations of C- Phycoery-
The defense case is set to start thrin, A Photo-Inducible Blue-Green
with an opening statement to the Algal Chromoprotein," 1139 Nat. Sci.
withan penng tateentto he Bldg., 4 pm.
jury by Russo's chief attorney, History 104 Film Series: Satyjit Ray's
Leonard Weinglass. The defenseJ "Davy," 1528 CC Little, 7:30 pm,
team said its first twohwitnesses CEWEnglish-women's Advocate Of-
fice: Anais Nin, author, will lecture &
will be retired Rear Adm. Gene read from her works, Rackham Lecture
Hall, 8 pm.
Music School: U varsity Band, John
D. Larkin, conductor, Hill Aud., 8 pm.
Music School: D. Francis, violin doc-
D ^t"- A kA C torai, SM Recital Hall, 8 pm.

SC 'ION
WHO MAY VOTE? All students (graduate students and undergraduates)
may vote.
WHO MAY RUN? Any regularly enrolled student on the Ann Arbor cam-
pus of the U. of M. This includes graduate and undergraduate stu-
dents from all schools and colleges.
HOW DOES ONE BECOME A CANDIDATE? Candidates must file a state-
ment of candidacy and a $5.00 returnable filing fee by March 1,
(Thursday). Candidates must also submit a platform and 2 wallet-
size photographs by March 2 at 3:00.
CAMPAIGNING is governed by the Election Code.
PROSPECTIVE CANDIDATES can obtain further information and copies of
the Statement of Candidacy, Election Code, and the SGC Constitution
at the SGC Offices, 3X Michigan Union, or call 763-3241.
ELECTION SCHEDULE:
March 1 (Thursday . . 5:00 p.m. Deadline for filing Statements
of Candidacy.
March 1 (Thursday . . 7:30 p.m. 'Candidates Meeting
March 1 (Thursday) . . 9:00 p.m. Campaign Begins
March 2 (Friday . . 3:00 p.m. Photograph's and Platforms due.
ELECTION: MARCH 27, 28, and 29

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