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February 27, 1973 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-27

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Fogs Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 27, 1.973

PaeSxiH1IHGA.AL Tedy Fbur-2,i7

SPRING BREAK
MARCH 2--9

ACAPU LCO
INCLUDED IN THE
PACKAGE:
* Round trip jet airfare be-
tween DETROIT and ACA-
PULCO, via Modern Air C-
990, with complete in-flight
service.
Round trip transfers and bag-
gage handling between air-
port and hotel.
Your choice of accommoda-
tions at the HOTEL PALA-
CIOS, only 1 block from Ac-
apulco's main beach.
Welcome Cocktail Party &
Dinner.
* Farewell Dinner.
* All taxes, tips, gratuity char-
ges.
VIA tour escort.
$229 Quad
$239 Triple
$259 Double
$149 Air Only

NASSAU
INCLUDED IN THE
PACKAGE:
* Round trip jet airfare be-
tween DETROIT and NAS-
SAU,cwith complete in-flight
service.
* Round trip transfers and bag-
gage handling between air-
port and hotel.
* Your choice of accommoda-
tions at the MONTAGU
BEACH HOTEL, private
beach, 2 nightclubs, and
more.
* Welcome Rum Swizzle Party.
* Manager's Cocktail Party.
* All taxes, tips, gratuity char-
ges.
* VIA tour escort.
$189 Quad
$209 Triple
$229 Double
$109 Air Only

Hoop
By BOB HEUER
At the outset of the 1972-73
academic year, the molders of
Michigan basketball fortunes,
John Orr, Jim Dutcher and Dick
Honig, were faced with two very
important tasks.
One concerned building a
championship contender with the
material they possessed, prob-
ably the best ever at Michigan.
The other was to replace the
host of. soon to graduate seniors
Henry Wilmore, Ken Brady, Er-
nie Johnson and John Lockard.
A good recruiting year was des-
perately needed to fill these
gaps.
XWith the team out of Big Ten
title contention and only four
games over .500 (13-9) for the
year, hope for achieving the first
goal has been abandoned.
The importance of the second
task, recruiting the caliber of
players who can step into a
starting role next year, now be-
comes even more vital.
If the right big men with the
ability to replace the collective

coaches

search

for

recruits

talents of Brady, Johnson and
Lockard, can be lured to Ann
Arbor, Orr will once again have
the talent needed to produce that
long awaited championship team.
If not, the 73-74 campaign could
make Orr wish that Don Canham
had heeded the pleas of the
"Dump Johnny" contingent.
Two high school seniors in the
state of Michigan are unquestion-
ably capable of stepping into a
starting role in the front line as
freshmen next year. One plays
ball within a 45-minute drive of
Crisler Arena, the other within
a two-minute walk.
Bob Elliot and Tom LaGarde,
of Ann Arbor Pioneer and De-
troit Catholic Central respective-
ly, represent the two most sought
after big men in the state, and
probably the whole midwest.
At 6-10, 215, LaGarde fits the
bill size-wise. He has no visible
weaknesses on the court and has
proven he can make his team a
winner. The CC Shamrocks are
currently 19-0 and rated tops in
the state. LaGarde is averhging

25 points and 19 rebounds a game
from his spot in the pivot.
"He's undoubtedly one of the
best prospects to play in Michi-
gan in a long time," says Wol-
verine assistant Jim Dutcher, of
LaGarde.
The recruiting battle for the fu-
ture services of Catholic Cen-
tral's pivotman have been fierce.
Michigan is only one of many
major colleges going after him.
"I think our toughest competition
for LaGarde is from Notre
Dame," said Dutcher, "it being
a Catholic school and all."
Members of the Michigan
coaching staff have seen La-

Garde play at least ten times this
year, including Sunday in the
Catholic League's first division
championships at the University
of Detroit.
In that one, LaGarde led
Catholic Central to an 81-55 vic-
tory over DePorres with 24
points, including 10 of 14 from
the field, 14 rebounds and "10 or
12 blocked shots" according to
Dick Honig who witnessed the
contest.
All the Michigan coaches have
met with LaGarde and his par-
ents and' an appointment has
been made for him to meet with
faculty members of the dental

school, where his career inter-
est$ lie. The prize prospects has
yet to give any hint where he
will enroll next fall however, so
as of now, the coaches can only
do their best-and hope.
The other top in-state pros-
pect, Pioneer's big Bob Elliot
possesses both size and strength
at 6-9, 230. Called "one of the
best big men in the country" by
Dutcher, Elliot leads a powerful
Pioneer outfit.
Eliot has at various times dur-
ing recent months, been reported-
ly headed one week for an Ivy
League school and the next
week, to UCLA. The Michigan
staff takes little stock in the
weekly rumors. "On the key high
schools players, every day you
hear something different on
where they're headed," said
Dutcher. "Until we hear that Bob
Elliot is no longer interested in
coming to Michigan, we'll be re-
cruiting him actively."
Elliot has the grades to go Ivy
League if he so desires. The big
senior sports a 3.8 point average.

He has spent a weekend on cam-
pus, paid for and planned by the
athletic department as if he
didn't live in Ann Arbor. But like
LaGarde, Elliot as yet has made
no commitment to any school.
Another top prospect is John
Davis, a 6-1 guard from Murray
Wright high school in the De-
troit City League. Davis leads
the PSL in scoring with a 31
point average. He has also visit-
ed the campus here and Orr has
met with his mother.
Of the out-of-state prospects, a
6-41%2 New York City boy, Ernie
Grunfeld leads the pack. The
coaching staff has kept in close
contact with Gunfeld, his par-
ents, and his coach throughout
the season. They saw him play,
34 point average and all, while
the team was in New York last
December and arranged for him
to visit the Michigan campus aft-
er his own season ends.
Steve Grote, a 6-1 guard from
Cincinnati, has also received
more than passing interest by
the Michigan staff.

1
.
i
.
1
.

i

Future Michigan Stars?
Edgar Burch, 6-2, g Pontiac Central Bob Erwin, 6-8, c Avondale
rony Dungy, 6.1, g Jackson Parkside Roosevelt Belcher, 6.7, f Grand Rapids
Gary Fulks, 6-3, g Redford Union Union
Mike Paciorek, 6-4, g Orchard Lake Greg Johnson, 6-7, c Saginaw
Edgar wilson, 6-6, I Dowagiac i McGlothlin, 6-5, 1 Muskegon Heights
rom Agardy, 6-11, c Allen Park Jerry Schellenberg, 6-6, f New Albany,
roin Scheffler, 6-9, c St. Joseph Id.
RandysMcClean, 6-8, sWalledLake Jeff Wilkens, 6-11, c Elgin, Ill.
Dave Ziegler, 6-9, c Saline Kevin Hay, 6-3, g Rich East, Ill.
Gerald Thomas, 6-7, f Connorsville, 1ll.
Ronnie Bostick, 6-7, f Romulus Dan Hipsher, 6-6, f Fostoria, Ohio
Jerome Gladney, 6-8, c Martin Luther Brad Farnham, 6-6, f Paris, Ill.
King Rick, White, 6-4, f Cincinnati, Ohio

Kimball tutors talented divers

VACATIONER'S INTERNATIONAL AGENCY IS THE
ONLY OFFICIAL ADMINISTRATOR OF
TRAVEL PROGRAMS ON THE U-M CAMPUS! !
CONTACT:
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTER
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621 Church St.-761-7966
Per seat price is pro-rata share of total charter cost
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These flights open only to U-M students, faculty,
staff and immediate families. Nassau: air-$89.15
/land--$99.85. Acapulco: air-$123/land-$106.
Subscribe to The Daily

LSA
COFFEE HOUR
TUESDAY
3:00-4:30
February 27
Afro-American Center
1100 S. University
(over Ann Arbor Bank
EVERYONE WELCOME

By CHUCK BLOOM coached many of them in his 14
In the world of diving, the Big years of instruction. Kimball him-
Ten conference is this nation's self was a former NCAA champion
dominant group. The diving coach- and the world's first professional
es for the last three Olympics have diving champion. He was the
all come from the Big Ten as have men's diving coach for the 1964
most of the divers. In Munich, Olympic team that traveled to To-
Hobie Billingsley of Indiana and kyo. Kimball's list of accomplish-
Ron O'Brien of Ohio State, shared ments is extensive but the real
the coaching duties for the men satisfaction he receives is from the
and women, respectively. But an- number of Olympic, NCAA and
other conference coach was pres- AAU champions he has coached.
ent and very much a factor in the Besides King, Rydze, and Ely,

competition; Michigan's diving
mentor Dick Kimball.
Two of Kimball's proteges gar-,
nered medals and another cap-
tured a pair of fourths. Captain
Micki King won the gold medal-
lion for women's springboard and
Dick Rydze copped a silver for his!
tower efforts. Janet Ely placed
fourth in both women's events.
Olympians and medalists are
nothing new to Kimball for he hasc

he has schooled such class divers
as Bob Webster, two-time Olym-
pic gold medalist in 1960 and
1964, and presently the diving ,
coach at Princeton, Lani Loken,
daughter of Wolverine gymnastic
coach Newt Loken and former
AAU champion, and Sweden's
Ulrika Knape, Munich gold med-
alist in women's tower.
Kimball is the only coach in the
conference who teaches tower div-

ing and attracts several divers for
that reason. "Tower diving, in my
opinion, helps springboard diving,"
stated Kimball. "It -is easier for
someone to get into diving by go-
ing into tower diving. It helps build
confidence because if you can dive
tower, you can dive anything."
Kimball is the type of coach who
challenges his divers to attempt
difficult dives and different heights.
"Some divers are treated like
prima donnas because their coach-
es tell them they can't do certain
things. So they don't bother to do
them. A diver has to learn to ad-
just to all sorts of different condi-
tions."
Kimball was taught by the late
Bruce Harlan here at Michigan
and is grooming several people to
be coaches in later life. "I'd like
to see the university set up a pro-
gram to teach young people to
coach," said Kimball. "Not only
to teach them the technical as-
pects, such as anatomy, but the
practicality of the sport. Several
divers come down to my summer
camp to learn how to spot and this
is the best training they can get."
For ahe first time in several
years, a Michigan diver has a
chance to take both the Big Ten
and NCAA crowns. Senior Joe
S M. . 'y AM 4 ::"S': }

I

6-POCKE T JUNGLE
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NEW WORLD MEDIA presents
* PLEASE STAND BY *
starring DAVID PEEL as FREEMONT ZAPATA
"THE ROBIN HOOD OF GUERRILLA TELEVISION"

Crawford has been, without a
doubt, the conference's outstand-
ing diver throughout the dual
meet season, ;and Kimball hopes
for the same type of performance
this weekend.
"Joe could conceivably win both
events just as in past perform-
ances. But I would say the favor-
ite would have to be Tim Moore
of Ohio State. Even though Craw-
ford beat him a couple of weeks
ago, Moore will be tough since he
is defending champion on the one-
meter board."
The big advantage for the Wol-
verine divers will be friendly Matt
Mann pool. "It is to our definite
advantage that the meet is here,"
explained Kimball. "A home pool
advantage is so decided because
you know the boards so well and
the lights and surroundings. It's
tough to come into a place cold
and try to adjust to strange boards
and then dive for a championship."
By no means does diving con-
sume all of Kimball's time. He
teaches a life savings course for
the universityand a gymnastics
course for grade schoolers. On
top of that, he is an extensive
world traveler. This seasonshe
has gone to Germany for a div-
ing exhibition and has appeared
on the Tonight Show.
A few years ago he and Bill-
ingsley (and later with O'Brien)
teamed up to put on summer div-
ing exhibitions all over the United
States and Asia. Kimball perform-
ed for seven years and earned the
title of the world's most acrobatic
diver; an accolade that still ap-
plies 'today.
Now over the summer Kimball
rins a diving camp in Brandon,
Florida, where he trains divers of
all ages and hopefully finds some
who are championship caliber.
What the future holds for Dick
Kimball hopefully consists of more
Olympians to train. Since his track
record is very good, 1976 should
see a Kimballite diving in Mon-
treal.

The Top 20

I

'
M

71

1. UCLA 36
2. N. C. State 2
3. Minnesota
4. Long Beach St.
5. Marquette
6. Providence
7. North Carolina
8. Houston
9. Maryland
10. Memphis St.
11. SW Louisiana
12. Indiana,
13. Missouri
14. Syracuse
15. New Mexico
16. Kansas State
17. St. John's
18. Jacksonville
19. South Carolina

23_0
23-0
18-2
22-2
22-2
21-2
21-5
20-3
19-4
21-4
21-2
17.5
18-4
20-4
22-4
19-4
18-5
20-5
18-5

756
686
557
471
451
371
293
250
244
192
180
173
86
75
63
61
26
24
21

i

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MUSIC BY
DAVID PEEL and THE
LOWER EAST SIDE
JOHN LENNON and
YOKO ONO
TEENAGE LUST
1984-and others
Followed by discussion with directors,
Jack and Joanna Milton.
Produced by the Media Liberation
Front of N.Y.C.
another NEW RELEASE from
New World Film Coop

WITH:
Wendy Apple
(Putney Swope)
Alex Bennet
(WPLJ FM)
Roberts Blossom
(Slaughterhouse-5)
David Peel
(Apple-"The Pope
Smokes Dope')
and MORE
TUES. & THURS.
(Feb. 27) (March 1)
Mod. Lang. Aud. III
7:15 & 9:30 P.M.
$1.25

20. Purdue 15-6 15
~ Centicore
Bookshops, Inc. ,
0
You are cordially invited
O to attend the 70th
birthday party for
ANAIS
NINA
on February 28.
l
Miss Nin is expected to
arrive at Centicore about
c 3 P.M. to greet her
Afriends and admirers.
336 Maynard St.
0c
n <:><n -t<J~ro

i'
I
i
i
I
:
:
4

Billboard
Anyone interested in becoming a
paid intramural volleyball official is
urged to attend a mass meeting to-
night at 7:30 in the Intramural
Building's wrestling room.
a * *
Intramural entry dates are today
for fraternity fool shooting and "A"
and "B" volleyball, residence hall
"A" and "B" volleyball and "M" gals
foul shooting.

I r

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FACTORY
AIR-CONDITIONED
WAnIMT cM&W

if
you
see
news
happen
call
76-DAILY

Winter Special
'73 GREMLIN
$ 229800*

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SPECIAL! HOT CHOCOLATE
Everyone Welcome

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