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February 08, 1973 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1973-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, February 8,.1973

Page Eight
,Violations
of truce
continue
(Continued from Page 1)
prisoners of war are expected -to
be released this weekend.
They turned over two South Viet-
namese soldiers in handcuffs who
carried details of the release of the
POWs, the ┬žources said.
Meanwhile, Vietnam's peace-
keeping missions met yesterday to
sharpen their plans for prisoner
exchanges and get their truce-
watching teams into the field to
bring a complete halt to the fight-
ing.
Delays in getting the military
commission up to its full comple-
ment have hampered the ICCS in
its attempts to field a full super-
visory force, supposed to be in
place a week ago.
A subcommittee of the JMC was
reported at work on plans to allow
the Viet Cong to join teams in the
field directly without passing
through Saigon, where bad blood
between the Viet Cong and the
South Vietnamese government has
produced procedural tangles and
delays.
Partly as a result, the ICCS has
dispatched its teams to regional
headquarters without the logistics
and security guarantees they need
to get into the field and police the
cease-fire signed Jan. 27 in Paris.
This support is supposed to come
from the military commission.
'Chif of the na tI~tnct

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thu rsdciy, February 8, '1973

i --- tea: r.zs. xxz .:<z^:::c$::;x.,

INCLUDES LAOS:
Kissinger on peace tour

DAILY OFFICIAL
jBULLETIN

i

AP Photo
Sheriff turns the tables
San Francisco Sheriff Richard Hongisto reclines in a cell at the county jail displaying an outfit he took
from one of his inmates yesterday. Hongisto pledges to occasionally wear the raggedy garb around
his city hall office to dramatize the need for more jail funds.

SOCIAL PROGRAMS AXED:
Nixons budget: Fight with
I Congress looms over cuts

(Continued from Page 1) 1
dia would be, in the view of U.S.
officials, of major help in carry-
ing through the Jan. 27 Paris pact
for an end to the war in Vietnam.
Kissinger is to fly from Vien-
tiane to Hanoi Saturday morning
Ann Arbor
barbers are
hip, costly
(Continued from Page 1)
make appointments at least a
week in advance.
The atmosphere in Town and
Campus is far from traditional
But then, so is the price.
Cuts begin at $4.25 and range as
high as $15.
If you're seeking something a
little less expensive, Hall's Bar-
ber Shop on N. 4th Ave. also
caters to long-hairs with regular
cuts costing $3 and shags start-
ing at $3.25.-
Other shops in town seeking
to appeal to the youth market
are the Dascola shops-Dascola's
Barbers on E. Liberty and U-M
Barbers on E. University.
Both offer regular and shag
cuts in the* $3 to $5 range, but
U-M Barbers is clearly the most
student-conscious of the two. Bob
Dascola, owner-manager of the
U-M shop, says, "The customer
decides how he wants his hair.
He communicates this to us and
we cut it that way."
Not all tonsorial parlors in
town are doing well with stu-
dents, however.
The Union barber shop in the
Michigan Union is suffering a
severe decline in business due-
according to manager Jay Friley
--to the fact that "kids just don't
trust a barber."
And in case you wax nostal-
gic, there are still plenty of the
old-fashioned shops your mother
used to drag you to in high
school-Reader's Digest on the
shelves and a hint of Muzak in
the air.
Jane Fonda in

for four days of talks with North THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 8
Vietnamese leaders on postwar re- DAY CALENDAR
lations, including U.S.-North Viet- MAENA
namese reconciliation' and the re- I aternal & Child Health Film Series:
namserecncliaioi ad he e-"Story of Eric," 1170 Sch. of Pub.
building of Indochina's torn coun- Hlth. II, noon.
try. Computing Ctr.: "Using the Link-
After a 12-day rest in Hong age Editor in MTS;" Seminar Rm.,I
Kong Feb. 13-14, Ziegler said, Kis- Comp. Ctr., 3:30 pm.
International Law Society: S. Mich-
singer will go to Peking for con- ida, "Negotiating International Trade
sultations with Chinese leaders.
His journeys to Hanoi and Pe-
king will give him an opportunity
to sound out the positions the North
Vietnamese and the Chinese will Due to overwh
take at the 13-party conference on
Vietnam, scheduled to open in
Paris Feb. 26. 4,q)SIA6z
The settlement negotiated by
Kissinger and North Vietnam's Le
Duc Tho called for the conference
to guarantee the Vietnam settle- .wii l ICons
ment and it was not known how
far China, the Soviet Union and GROU P L SSO
other participants at the confer-
ence, including Britain and France,
are prepared to go incommitting Beg inning F
themselves to direct involvement
in post-war Indochina.

elming response

ducting new
NS IN GUITAR
ebruary 10th

DUBLIN, Ireland (P) - An ave-
nue in Bray is only 80 yards
long but has five sections with dif-
ferent names - Duncairn Avenue,
Elm Grove, St. Aiden's Terrace,
Seapoint Terrace and Carlisle Cres-
cent.

Rules: Reconciling the Diverse Points
of view in Eastern, western & Less
Developed Countries", 132 Hutchins.
3:30 pm.
Ctr. for Early Childhood Devel. &
Educ.: L. Bloom, Columbia U., "Spon-
taneous Imitation in Early Language
Development," Aud. B, Angell Hall, 4
pm.
LSA G r a d u a t i o n Require-
ments Comm.: discussion on English
requirements, 35 Angell Hall, 4 pm.
Student Lab Theatre: Terry's "Com-
ings & Goings;" Bullins' "A Son, Come
Home," Arena Theater, Frieze Bldg.,
4 pm.
Extension Serv.-English Dept.: Poet-
ry Reading, R. Francis, author of
Come Out into the Sun, UGLI Multi-
purpose Rm., 4:10, pm. f

Rental instrument kits are available at a
nominal charge applicable toward purchase
of the instrument. Private and group
lessons are also available in guitar, flute,
recorder, banjo; and drums.
For information call 769-4980
,4lbh bbo,* #tuAc F IW o

U
1.

I

HAIRSTYLING
As You Like It !
NEW TRENDS FOR 1972
TRIMS - SHAGS
AND RAZOR CUTS
____2 SHOPS
611 E. UNIVERSITY
615 E. LIBERTY
Dascola Barbers

I- 1Csit v c11UIVL1en ssion ort . (Continued from Page 1) responsibility to state and local get "represents impeccable eco-
the military commission - North
Vietnamese, South ' Vietnamese, President, nor the Congress, nor a governments in broad areas like nomic policy and intolerable socialI
Viet Cong and United States-met centralized bureaucracy, can keep housing and education. policy."
for 3% hours yesterday in efforts neighborhood streets safe, clean But, such revenue sharing would One of the largest single chops
to get the operation on its feet. up local pollution, meet local pub- take some time before it found its out of the budget, however,-that
In Paris, representatives of the lic health emergencies, unsnarl way down the pipeline, and has of cutting federal grants to enable
Saigon government and the Viet local traffic problems, or pick up been opposed because of the un- cities to provide social services -
Cong met for the second time this local garbage. Such problems re- equal impact it would most likely represents something of a fiscal il-
week to work out details on start- quire local concerns, local deci- have on different areas. usint
ing substantive talks to determine sions and local action." While the President proposes;
the political future of South Viet- The general revenue sharing bill saving $2.7 billion in fiscal 1974
nam sdeAnd, in keeping with the decen- enacted by Congress last year has and $4.7 billion the following year
Both s said further proced- tralized view of how government already been attacked for purport- through cuts in these grants, Con-
ural issues were resolved during should work, the Presidential bud- edly unfair distribution of funds gress has already placed a $2.5
the three-hour meeting. But they get message proposed "special favoring suburbs over center ci- billion ceiling on these outlays and
gave no details and announced revenue sharing" - transferring ties. Furthermore, locally admin- has no intention of removing it.
plans to meet again Saturday. both Federal money and spending istered social programs have tra- President Nixon has thus "sav-
ditionally been more conservative ed" imaginary money. How manyI
and less beneficial to minorities more such programs we will be
South E nd threatened-"than federally sponsored projects, piling up savings from is a spec-
Finally, it is unclear how closely The question of what will fin-
uTie qmatter. ha wl fn
funds earmarked for special reve- ally result from the debate over
p g now spent on federal social wel- ter for speculation. What does
Laces censorship fight nue sharing would match those federal spending is equally a mat- j1 o pn nfdrlsca e-'trfrseuain ht de
fare projects. seem clear at the moment, how-
(Continued from Page 1) ]effect on both the staff and the The budget's implications have ever, is that a strong President
partment is working on the case editorial policy of the paper. largely been ignored or accepted. wielding a hefty axe will not find:
but has no leads at present. If ratified, the proposal would Former economic advisor Arthur all his own recommendations on
He has submitted a recommenda- not go into effect for thirty days. Okun, for instance, said the bud- the chopping block.
tion to be voted on tomorrow by the What its possible effect on the
Board of Governors which would present staff will be remains un-
allow him to hand-pick the mem- known. In response to the recom-
bers of the Student Publications mendation, News Editor Darryl
Board. He also proposed that in Humphries remarked, "Regardless
the future, the majority of the news of whether we have to leave or
printed be restricted to primarily not, we will still do what we can
that of the university community. to expose U.S. policies."
The statute, if passed, would in- The staff plans to seek a court
crease the members of the Stu- 'injunction against Gullen if the
dent Publications Board from six proposal is passed.
to twelve, four of whom would be A
Gullen's peronal choices, with non. rally is being held tomorrow NATURAL FOODSRESTAURANT
outside recommendations. in defense of the South End in the N T R L F O S R S A R N
At present, the Board consists of University Ball Room. Speakers REOPENS TU ES., FEB. 6
will address the crowd on the
four student members, picked Nixon Administration's alleged pre 9 to 9 Daily Sunday 4-9 Closed Monday
the student body, and two faculty
members. If the proposal passed, vention of the dissemination of the
the Board would consist of seven news. NATURAL FOODS STORE
student members, chosen by Gullen_-
from 14 recommendations made by i NOW FEATURING FRESH BAKED GOODSI
the student faculty council, and BORDERS BOOK SHOP
five other members from variousv and
university agencies. SPECIALlI A COMPLETE BOOKSTORE
Because Gullen would have the 9 to 9 Daily 12 to 9 Sunday,
power to both appoint and dismiss 9io
the Board, the university admin-c
istration would then have a direct MADN 314 E. LIBERTY
V 761-8679
SAO PAULO, Brazil () - Taxi
driver Carlos Dos Santos found

336 S. STATE

OPEN MON-SAT. 9:30-9:00

U.

wa

(R

LIVE THE GOOD LIFE

Room and Board in a Co-op
Free washers: dryers, 10c Coke machines, "guff," great
people, decent food!
Cal 662-4414 or stop by
Room 3-N, Michigan Union
FOR MORE INFORMATION
Be your own landlord! Join Inter-Cooperative Council

EU ROPE
1973 SUMMER FLIGHTS
9 FULL DINNER WITH WINE 0 CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST 0 COMPLIMEN-

"emerges as the finest screen
actress of her generation."
-LIFE
Friday-Saturday
Feb. 9-10-7-8-9-10 p.m.
MLB Auditoriums 3 & 4
$1.25 Cant. Friends of NR

I

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TARY FRUITS, SNACKS
PRIVILEGES * DEPOSIT
STOP JET

* COMPLIMENTARY OPEN BAR " CANCELLATION
HOLDS SEAT " FINANCING ARRANGEMENTS 0 NON-

11

?i U,

a suitcase in his cab containing
$50,000, returned it to two German
businessmen and got a $25 reward.
PHENOMENOLOGY
GROUP
PRESENTS
GARY BRON
(Professor of Psychology)
U. of M.
IN LECTURE
"A PHENOMENOLOGICAL
ANALYSIS OF REPRESSION"
Thurs., Feb. 8-7:30 p.m.
Mich Union, Faculty Lounge

v
v- O
PHYLLIS CHESLER'S
WOMEN & MADNESS
A Probing and Timely Study
SLIST: 8.95
SALE: 7.29
316 S. STATE ST.
OPEN: Mon.-Sat. 8:45-10 p.m.
O<-> t<c-: a<->c->o<->

LECTURE & DISCUSSION Friday, Feb. 9-7:30 p.m.
ANGELL HALL, Aud. C-free admission
THIRD LECTURE IN THE DIMENSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE SERIES
Workshop in Zen Practice Sat., Feb. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
UNION BALLROOM $5 contribution
-please bring 2 blankets to serve as sitting cushions & wear loose fitting clothing
CONDUCTED BY TWO SENIOR DISCIPLES OF ROSHI PHILIP KAPLEAU
OF THE ZEN CENTER, ROCHESTER, N.Y.
sponsored by the. Office of Religious Affairs & the Ann Arbor Zen Group

Dates
5/3-6/5
5/4-6/22
5/1 1-6/26
5/17-8/12.
5/23-7/3
5/30-7/30
6/3-7/7
6/10-8/12
6/18-7/16
6/27-8/30
7/1-8/1
7/7-8/14
7/3-9/4
7/8-7/26
7/15-8/29
7/22-8/26
8/1-8/30
8/14-9/6
8/30
5/15-7/3
5/27-8/15
6/20-7/23
7/9-8/2
7/18-8/31
8/7-9/4
8/26-9/5

Routing
D/Bru/D
D/Par/D
D/Bru/Par/D
D/Bru/D
D/ Bru/ D
D/Ams/D
D/Bru/D
D/Bru/Par/D
D/Ams/Lon/D
D/Ams/Par/D
D/Ams/Lon/D
D/Ams/D
D/Bru/D
D/Bru/Lon/D
D/ Bru/Ams/D
D/Par/D
D/Ams/Lon/D
D/Par/D
D/Ams
NY/Ams/NY
NY/Ams/
Lon/NY
NY/Ams/NY
NY/Ams/'
Par/NY
NY/Par/NY
NY/Ams/NY
NY/Bru/NY

Carrier (s)
SAB
AF
SAB/AF
SAB
SA B
MAR
SAB
SAB/AF
ONA
MAR/AF
ONA
MAR
SAB
SAB/ONA
SAB/MAR
AF
ONA
AF
MAR
ONA/MAR
ONA
MAR
MAR/AF
AF
MAR
SAB

Air-
Craft
DC-8
B-707
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8.
DC-8
DC-8
DC- 8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC -8
B-707
DC-8
-707
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
DC-8
B-707
DC -8
DC -8

Seats
180
164
180
180
180
180
180
180
250
180
252
180
180
180
180
164
252
164
180
250
252
1 80
180
164
1 80
180

Cost
$170
$175
$175
$200
$170
$200
$175
$210
$205
$210
$210
$210
$210
$200
$210
$210
$210
$210
$100
$160
$170
$170
$175
$175
$170
$170

Admin.
Chrge.
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20.
$20
$20
$20
$20
$20

Total
$190
$195
$195
$220
$190
$220
$195
$230
$225
$230
$230
$230
$230
$220
$230
$230
$230
$230
$120
$180
$190
$190
$195
$195
$190
$190

i

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FRIDAY;FEB. 9th, NOON LUNCHEON
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